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Julian Bond 2011-2019 | Google+ Archive |  Home
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeI'm hiding behind the sofa. This is the scariest ever Dr Who Christmas Special. — Stanley Kubrick and his hotel corridor designs have found a rich, fertile ground. Does the White House have any elevators?
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Commented on post by Friends+Me in Google+ Help+Rupert Wood We may have had this discussion elsewhere, but I disagree with the ownership issue. As a community owner I have complete control over it. There is a sense in which I own the content posted in my community. There is a valid use case to do this. Where a community collectively decides they want to preserve and archive the communities content. Community owners and members are asking for this now. Google already does this. There are several places in the Takeout data where somebody else's post content ends up in your Takeout file. Examples include +1s on comments, +1s on posts. I'm not sure it helps to say "Google shouldn't, or couldn't do this" when it's a FAQ and a definite need. Currently, the Communities takeout is pretty useless precisely because it doesn't contain the content, only pointers to the post URLs. When those URLs may well 404 at some time in the future. But then the side effects of GDPR irritate the hell out of me. Just like Cookies before it. ;) — Good news everyone, We've released Google+ Exporter, an application that helps you to export your Google+ feeds (profile, pages, collections, communities, including all comments) to Wordpress eXtended RSS file. Another available option is to export all posts published to profile, pages, collections, and communities to JSON file, including all comments! Export up to 3000 posts with our free version. I would love to know your opinion, suggestions or requests. Thank you!
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearDo you have any kind of feel for how many communities people join if they join any at all? The UI seems to discourage joining more than 10 or so. — G+ Communities Rank-Size plot, based on 12,000 obs. sample The rank-size relation is a common feature of most population and group studies, see: http://www.statisticalconsultants.co.nz/blog/the-rank-size-rule-of-city-populations.html Plotting log-log of size (population or members) vs. rank (sorted order), a linear relation generally emerges. We see that here. The actual y-intercept should be about 4.3 million (Photography community), but the mainline sample, from about n=10 to n=1,000 gives a good fit. Values here are based on a 12,000 observation sample, multiply ranks by about 600 to get the full Communities estimate. More on analysis: https://old.reddit.com/r/plexodus/comments/9zx67d/google_communities_membership_analysis_preview/
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeAnyone for a repeat of Tottenham? As a motorcyclist and scooter rider I'm seriously uncomfortable with the Police using cars as offensive weapons. But there's no money for traditional policing. And the kids are a nasty bunch of thieving mudlarks who seem to like knifing each other. That stole my Burgman 400 in East London. So it's not like I have a lot of sympathy. But still. Is this what we want from our law and order systems in a civilised, rule based society? — Meanwhile, our grim Mad Max future is one step closer. The Met police has decided what to do with those violent moped gangs in London. They knock them off their mopeds. With those police cars. (Before you all get your knickers in a twist. Thats a specially trained group of drivers, and the police watchdog has the uneviable task to go through all this dashcam videos. Moped crime has gone down by 44% from last year.) I see a movie here. Mad Max V: Brexit Britain. With Tom Hardy and Simon Pegg.
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Commented on post by Don McCollough in Google+ HelpGoogle helpfully gives us these reference codes. But what do they mean? What are we supposed to do with them? — Good afternoon. Due to the consumer G+ sunsetting, I've been migrating my collections to Blogger. Everything has been fine until the last ~30 hours when every single post of mine that has the full links to the Blogger sites was removed with the emails citing the reason as "spam". I've reposted my contact info post to my profile again, but it was pulled twice and then once for two of my collections. It seems the filters are having false positives. I only have these posts on my profile and I do not spam/share them anywhere.
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Commented on post by Brian Williams in Google+ Help+Ifinder Ifindi Yes. And if you drill into Google+Stream, you get, ActivityLog, Collections, Events, Photos, Posts, And ActivityLog gives you +1s on comments +1s on posts Comments Poll Votes Google's really not helping here by hiding and combining these options but it is what it is. — I attempted to download my Google+ stream at http://takeout.google.com. However, there is no option to download Google+ info (see attached photos). Appreciate help from anyone who can tell me what I am overlooking. Thanks.
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Commented on post by Brian Williams in Google+ Help+1 s are in 2 places. - Top of the Takeout list. this is external websites you have applied a G+ +1 to via a button on that website. - G+Stream.Activitylog, which contains +1s on comments and +1s on posts inside G+ — I attempted to download my Google+ stream at http://takeout.google.com. However, there is no option to download Google+ info (see attached photos). Appreciate help from anyone who can tell me what I am overlooking. Thanks.
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Commented on post by Brian Williams in Google+ HelpThat's actually quite strange. My guess is that the account you're logged in as doesn't have a Google+ Profile. So Google have helpfully left out the G+ options. If I look at the same page with my account, I see G+ +1s at the top. And 3 entries for G+ Circles/Communities/Stream between Google Shopping and Groups. — I attempted to download my Google+ stream at http://takeout.google.com. However, there is no option to download Google+ info (see attached photos). Appreciate help from anyone who can tell me what I am overlooking. Thanks.
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Commented on post by Bill Brayman in Google+ Mass MigrationI really hate Twitter. And wish it would just die already. But meanwhile I visit it every day via a small highly curated list. — Two interesting items here, Twitter's discussion limitations, but also a big page of all of google's sometimes fantastic castaway products. check out gcemetery.co
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Commented on post by Don McCollough in Google+ HelpInteresting use case for copying and archiving G+content across to a pre-existing Blogger blog. It would be great if Google could provide tools to make this easier. But even if they don't, there's potential for some 3rd party to use Takeout, the G+API and the Blogger API to do this semi-automatically. And then in the meantime, what's the best way of telling your followers that the content has migrated? — Good afternoon. Due to the consumer G+ sunsetting, I've been migrating my collections to Blogger. Everything has been fine until the last ~30 hours when every single post of mine that has the full links to the Blogger sites was removed with the emails citing the reason as "spam". I've reposted my contact info post to my profile again, but it was pulled twice and then once for two of my collections. It seems the filters are having false positives. I only have these posts on my profile and I do not spam/share them anywhere.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitSomebody asked "What happened in Mid-2015". Oh Look. Theresa May, Home Secretary. 12 May 2010 – 13 July 2016 And remember these from 2013? https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/jul/30/illegal-immigrant-poster-go-home — The Home Office has wrongly tried to force at least 300 highly skilled migrants to leave Britain under an immigration rule used in part to tackle terrorists and those judged to be a threat to national security, government figures show. The figures, revealed in a governmental review of its use of the controversial 322(5) provision, also suggest that up to 87 highly skilled migrants – including teachers, doctors, lawyers, engineers and IT professionals – have actually been wrongly forced to leave the UK under the terrorism-related legislation. A further 400 people may have been affected. They are largely people who have lived in the UK for a decade or more and have British-born children. Many were given just 14 days to leave and were no longer eligible for a visa to visit the UK or any other country. All the victims were denied the right to work, rent property or use the NHS during their appeals. Some chose to leave the UK but many of those who chose to stay and fight their cases were forced into destitution, debt and mental health issues, with some considering suicide, the review found. Children had suffered severe trauma and their parents feared it would have a life-long impact on them. The review revealed that 65% of Home Office 322(5) decisions were thrown out by the first-tier tribunal while 45% of applicants were successful at judicial review, against an ordinary applicant success rate of 28%. An extra 32% of “complex cases” could be wrongly decided, the review said. It also revealed that across all immigration categories refusal of settlement applications was 5% until mid-2015, when it increased to 52% for tier 1 (general) migrants. Paragraph 322(5) of the rules has been a central reason given for the Home Office’s refusal of those in this group. The review found that the most common mistake made by the Home Office was its failure to distinguish between a late submission of tax and an amended tax return. So I can get deported if I try to file my taxes in the right way? Splendid.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Warwick Varley Remember the kids at Glastonbury and festivals 2 years ago chanting "Ooh, Jeremy Corbyn". I think it's fair to say that the drug of choice for Brexiters is alcohol. And I'd guess that the drugs of choice of Remainers is all the rest, and alcohol. — I am surprised the figure is not higher, to be honest. Other cracking stats about Brexiters: Brexiteers (12%) are six times more likely to believe climate change is a hoax than remainers (2%), though this pales in comparison to the almost half of Trump voters (47%). A belief there are harmful effects from vaccines and that they are hidden from the public is more than twice as prevalent among leave voters (13%) than remainers (5%). Fifteen per cent of Brexiteers and 11 per cent of EU supporters agree with the statement: “Regardless of who is officially in charge of governments and other organisations, there is a single group of people who secretly control events and rule the world together.”
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Hartmut Noack Sorry about that. climate-alarmist was an unintentional dog-whistle. I should have said AGW believers or something. As you point out, being alarmed by climate change is an entirely rational response to the science not necessarily the deniers term of abuse, like "Warmist". — I am surprised the figure is not higher, to be honest. Other cracking stats about Brexiters: Brexiteers (12%) are six times more likely to believe climate change is a hoax than remainers (2%), though this pales in comparison to the almost half of Trump voters (47%). A belief there are harmful effects from vaccines and that they are hidden from the public is more than twice as prevalent among leave voters (13%) than remainers (5%). Fifteen per cent of Brexiteers and 11 per cent of EU supporters agree with the statement: “Regardless of who is officially in charge of governments and other organisations, there is a single group of people who secretly control events and rule the world together.”
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitTow the whole of the UK outside the UK 5-mile limit. Then we'll have unlimited fishing rights. I've long thought the UK would be a much better place if it had half the people and was 1000 miles further south. Never mind Gibraltar, perhaps we need to annex the Canaries. Now if we can just find a way of cutting the population. The traditional empire way of keeping a newly conquered territory under control is to put a hated minority in charge. This gets a bit tricky with post-Brexit UK because the obvious candidates are all a bit ideologically unsound and I'll get into trouble if I suggest them. I'd offer the Buddhists but there's not really enough of them and even they are getting a bit of a bad name just now. So I think Vegetarian Hindus are the thing. When the borders shut, we'll have trouble feeding ourselves. And nobody wants cheap tasteless chicken from the colonies. But there's never any decent veggy curries in the supermarkets. So, I for one, welcome our new Hindu Vegan overlords with their Masala Dosa, Roti, Daal and milk sweets. The Monster Raving Loony Party used to have a thing about uniting all the islands off the coast of Europe into one nation of "The Rainbow Isles". Since those long ago times, the rainbow has been co-opted by the LGBT community. So here's the deal. Forget about all those silly christian sects and the 500 years of bloodshed. Let's unite the UK and the Republic of Ireland into one safe haven for all those who are pronoun challenged or have non-CIS sexual preferences. And just think how much it will wind up the gammons. — Charlie is determined to make Brexit work, and has some ideas: 1) Swap Scotland with North Korea. Out with gay-hugging pinko commie socialists, in with Juche. (Which is similar to Tory philosophy anyway.) 2) De-decimisation. £1 is 23 shillings, 1s is 11 pence, 1p is 3 halfpennies. Pass a law that makes sure that all computers operating in the kingdom must support this in hardware. British computing corners the market! 3) Invade Gibraltar. Get some second-hand Iranian anti-ship missiles from Syria and control the entrance to the Mediterranian. Issue letters of marque, roll in the money. From the comments: 4) Sink the French fleet. 5) Repeal the 1824 Weights and Measures Act. Wet herring is obviously counted to short 100. 6) Declare the Isle of Wight to be Brexit Island, move all Brexiters there. 7) Charge a royalty for the use of the English language. 8) MI6 starts supporting far right populists on the continent to fill the European Parliament with Nazis. Suddenly everyone will think Brexit is a good idea! 9) Bring back aristocracy. 10) Just nuke the EU. 11) Some Royal marries a Disney princess and the UK merges with Disneyland. 12) Build a space elevator.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitMore seriously, I find it interesting that anti-science people are often actually anti-some-science. So pro-GMO, Pro-Nuclear, Climate Deniers are a thing. But so are Anti-GMO, Anti-Nuclear, Climate-Alarmists. And even radical vegans like their mobile phones. Dig it. All these tribes exist. Pro-GMO, AGW Believers = Ecomodern Pro-GMO, AGW Skeptics = GWPF Anti-GMO, AGW Believers = Greens Anti-GMO, AGW Deniers = Anti-science conspiracy nuts Pro-Nuclear, AGW Believers = Ecomodern, Lovelock Pro-Nuclear, AGW Skeptics = GWPF, Lukewarmists Anti-Nuclear, AGW Believers = Greens (especially EU) Anti-Nuclear, AGW Deniers = Anti-science conspiracy nuts — I am surprised the figure is not higher, to be honest. Other cracking stats about Brexiters: Brexiteers (12%) are six times more likely to believe climate change is a hoax than remainers (2%), though this pales in comparison to the almost half of Trump voters (47%). A belief there are harmful effects from vaccines and that they are hidden from the public is more than twice as prevalent among leave voters (13%) than remainers (5%). Fifteen per cent of Brexiteers and 11 per cent of EU supporters agree with the statement: “Regardless of who is officially in charge of governments and other organisations, there is a single group of people who secretly control events and rule the world together.”
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass Migrationm'kay. This looks like a classic power law. So expect a very long tail. The interesting bit is going to be “The Fat Middle”. That’s the ~250,000 (wild guess) of communities with >250 people. Automating it is going to be hard but hand sampling of things might be interesting. Like “date of most recent non-pinned post” and the profile ID of the owners and moderators. As sites go from nerdy to massive the UI function gets smaller. When you start it seems really obvious to provide a list of communities like a large spreadsheet with numerous columns and sort orders. All communities sorted by most recent activity, or by owner name, or by total number of posts or whatever. By the time Google has applied it's army of managers to it, you get a page of pretty pictures in response to a search and that's it. "Communities 'Suggested for you' ". https://plus.google.com/communities/recommended seems particularly fond of very large communities high up in the "Short Head". Wow! https://plus.google.com/communities/101740425670472889181 Photography - 4,320,172 members - Public — Estimating G+ Communities by size I've been kicking at the problem of trying to estimate total G+ activity for a few years, and with the Plexodus, the question of how many active Communities are there is particularly pressing. Setting an arbitrary cutoff, consider communities of > 1,000 members. Based on some preliminary results -- 6,000+ completed of a larger randomly-selected communities sample of 12,000, I'm going to suggest there are about 55k - 65k communities > 1,000 members on Google+, from a total Communities population of 7.974 million. I'm using my old familiar method of working from sitemaps for Google+, with a running commentary as results come in posted to Diaspora here: https://joindiaspora.com/posts/dbee1250d0680136d1dc0218b70db60d Briefly, you can grab the top-level sitemaps via Google+'s robots.txt file, at https://plus.google.com/robots.txt One line of that file reads: Sitemap: http://www.gstatic.com/communities/sitemap/communities-sitemap.xml That's not actually the Communities list itself, but a listing of another 100 files containing all 7,974,281 individual communities. Rather than look at each of those, I've randomly selected a set of 12,000 (after a first run of 300) to look at. Generally, random sampling allows you to work with very small sample sizes, but given the highly-skewed Poison / power-curve distribution of Community membership populations, we need more numbers. The pull is running now, at about a query a second, and I'd crossed the 6,000 community mark a few minutes back. There are two sets of statistics which are of interest, univariate moments which give a general sense of the dataset, and a ranked-item report, listing the largest of the communities. The first gives an overall sense of the data, the second reveals what the top end of the data show, much of which is far outside the reach of the first report, and where the vast majority of community memberships reside. The univariate data: count, sum, min, max, mean, etc: n: 5655, sum: 597008, min: 1, max: 217297, mean: 105.571706, median: 2, sd: 2979.245712 %-ile: 5: 1, 10: 1, 15: 1, 20: 1, 25: 1, 30: 1, 35: 1, 40: 1, 45: 1, 55: 2, 60: 3, 65: 4, 70: 5, 75: 8, 80: 13, 85: 22, 90: 45, 95: 129 What this tells us is that the typical Community size is very nearly 1. The mode is 2. And it's not until we get to the 95%ile that populations are over 100. The maximum (of the sample so far) is nearly a quarter million, at 217,297 members (a Spanish-speaking religious community, "La Palabra de Dios tiene Poder Comunidad", "The Word of God has Power Community" -- https://plus.google.com/communities/118362296060634412141), which is over 8x larger than the 2nd largest in the sample. The ranked listing shows (at this moment) 56 communities in the sample of > 1,000 members, each one representing about 1,086 other communities, or giving us roughly 60,000 communities of > 1,000 members. Similarly, there are likely about 9,800 communities with 10k+ members, and about 2,000 with 26,000+ members. (There's a report of the top 60 ranked communities below). *Keep in mind that community counts and populations have little to do with actual quality, and there may be some exceptionally vibrant, small communities of only a dozen or so members. That's not what I'm analysing here.* (I've ... heard variants of this argument for going on four years based on earlier analysis.) But for a sense of what potential bounds are, this should be useful information. (Needless to say, I'd really like to obtain confirmation of this from, oh, say, Google, just to pick a random authoritative source out of the air, but if it's got to be Space Alien Cats, let it be Space Alien Cats.) Other potentially interesting bits: Current sample (of 12,000): 6831 Total public: 6190 (90.61%) Member distribution: n: 5914, sum: 602661, min: 1, max: 217297, mean: 101.904126, median: 2, sd: 2913.446902 %-ile: 5: 1, 10: 1, 15: 1, 20: 1, 25: 1, 30: 1, 35: 1, 40: 1, 45: 1, 55: 2, 60: 3, 65: 4, 70: 5, 75: 8, 80: 13, 85: 22, 90: 44, 95: 125 Communities report Total communities: 6827 Total public: 6183 (90.57%) Total private: 644 ( 9.43%) Total open membership: 3773 (55.27%) Total closed membership: 3054 (44.73%) Total membership (public only): 602661 Mean membership (public only): 101.90 (And if you're noticing that the counts are creeping up, that's because, as I've said, the script's running now, though the numbers are sufficiently solid I'm confident in leaking a set.) (Further update: a 2nd large community with 126,123 members has turned up.) In other news, I've been looking at present G+ public participation and the fortunes of the 4,214 active profiles I found in 2015, versus the attrition rate of Google's last-updated profiles sitemap from 2017-3-1. Of the latter set, 1.6% were unreachable, giving 404 errors when I attempted to scrape them. Of the 2015 sample, the 404 rate is 13.24%. That is, having an active profile in 2015 gives an 8.275x higher likelihood of having a dead account in 2018 than having any account in March of 2017. That's ... an interesting result. The constructive active, public participants in G+ are too small to be seen in my current 3,000 profile sample. That corresponds roughly to < 1 million such users, and given some other data (3,248 members of G+MM as I type this, 7,061 users on the Pluspora Diaspora pod, 33,066 signatures on the "Don't Shut Down Google Plus" Change.org petition), it seems that somewhere in the 10k - 100k range, possibly bumping toward 1m with lurkers, etc., is the likely solid core. A value I've suggested often. (And yes, aggreeing on definitions, and finding accessible and trustworthy metrics is difficult.) 1 217297 members 2 26389 members 3 23412 members 4 22953 members 5 16902 members 6 12763 members 7 11490 members 8 10321 members 9 8782 members 10 7406 members 11 6819 members 12 6704 members 13 5344 members 14 5148 members 15 4972 members 16 4624 members 17 4590 members 18 4142 members 19 3518 members 20 3368 members 21 3243 members 22 3177 members 23 3164 members 24 3158 members 25 3035 members 26 2973 members 27 2764 members 28 2507 members 29 2477 members 30 2474 members 31 2334 members 32 2226 members 33 2070 members 34 2029 members 35 1964 members 36 1745 members 37 1744 members 38 1720 members 39 1620 members 40 1614 members 41 1593 members 42 1563 members 43 1501 members 44 1458 members 45 1343 members 46 1266 members 47 1230 members 48 1196 members 49 1160 members 50 1155 members 51 1133 members 52 1084 members 53 1035 members 54 1025 members 55 1009 members 56 1008 members 57 978 members 58 964 members 59 957 members 60 924 members Reminder: these are partial results, values will vary a bit, though should be reasonably reliable.
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Commented on postMan does not live by sugar beet alone.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationOf all the posts of this, where would you like commentary? ;) I take it you're scraping front pages to get the membership figure? Shame there's no easy way to get total posts, owner or moderators. Shame there's no API for communities. Shame Takeout for communities is so minimal. — Estimating G+ Communities by size I've been kicking at the problem of trying to estimate total G+ activity for a few years, and with the Plexodus, the question of how many active Communities are there is particularly pressing. Setting an arbitrary cutoff, consider communities of > 1,000 members. Based on some preliminary results -- 6,000+ completed of a larger randomly-selected communities sample of 12,000, I'm going to suggest there are about 55k - 65k communities > 1,000 members on Google+, from a total Communities population of 7.974 million. I'm using my old familiar method of working from sitemaps for Google+, with a running commentary as results come in posted to Diaspora here: https://joindiaspora.com/posts/dbee1250d0680136d1dc0218b70db60d Briefly, you can grab the top-level sitemaps via Google+'s robots.txt file, at https://plus.google.com/robots.txt One line of that file reads: Sitemap: http://www.gstatic.com/communities/sitemap/communities-sitemap.xml That's not actually the Communities list itself, but a listing of another 100 files containing all 7,974,281 individual communities. Rather than look at each of those, I've randomly selected a set of 12,000 (after a first run of 300) to look at. Generally, random sampling allows you to work with very small sample sizes, but given the highly-skewed Poison / power-curve distribution of Community membership populations, we need more numbers. The pull is running now, at about a query a second, and I'd crossed the 6,000 community mark a few minutes back. There are two sets of statistics which are of interest, univariate moments which give a general sense of the dataset, and a ranked-item report, listing the largest of the communities. The first gives an overall sense of the data, the second reveals what the top end of the data show, much of which is far outside the reach of the first report, and where the vast majority of community memberships reside. The univariate data: count, sum, min, max, mean, etc: n: 5655, sum: 597008, min: 1, max: 217297, mean: 105.571706, median: 2, sd: 2979.245712 %-ile: 5: 1, 10: 1, 15: 1, 20: 1, 25: 1, 30: 1, 35: 1, 40: 1, 45: 1, 55: 2, 60: 3, 65: 4, 70: 5, 75: 8, 80: 13, 85: 22, 90: 45, 95: 129 What this tells us is that the typical Community size is very nearly 1. The mode is 2. And it's not until we get to the 95%ile that populations are over 100. The maximum (of the sample so far) is nearly a quarter million, at 217,297 members (a Spanish-speaking religious community, "La Palabra de Dios tiene Poder Comunidad", "The Word of God has Power Community" -- https://plus.google.com/communities/118362296060634412141), which is over 8x larger than the 2nd largest in the sample. The ranked listing shows (at this moment) 56 communities in the sample of > 1,000 members, each one representing about 1,086 other communities, or giving us roughly 60,000 communities of > 1,000 members. Similarly, there are likely about 9,800 communities with 10k+ members, and about 2,000 with 26,000+ members. (There's a report of the top 60 ranked communities below). *Keep in mind that community counts and populations have little to do with actual quality, and there may be some exceptionally vibrant, small communities of only a dozen or so members. That's not what I'm analysing here.* (I've ... heard variants of this argument for going on four years based on earlier analysis.) But for a sense of what potential bounds are, this should be useful information. (Needless to say, I'd really like to obtain confirmation of this from, oh, say, Google, just to pick a random authoritative source out of the air, but if it's got to be Space Alien Cats, let it be Space Alien Cats.) Other potentially interesting bits: Current sample (of 12,000): 6831 Total public: 6190 (90.61%) Member distribution: n: 5914, sum: 602661, min: 1, max: 217297, mean: 101.904126, median: 2, sd: 2913.446902 %-ile: 5: 1, 10: 1, 15: 1, 20: 1, 25: 1, 30: 1, 35: 1, 40: 1, 45: 1, 55: 2, 60: 3, 65: 4, 70: 5, 75: 8, 80: 13, 85: 22, 90: 44, 95: 125 Communities report Total communities: 6827 Total public: 6183 (90.57%) Total private: 644 ( 9.43%) Total open membership: 3773 (55.27%) Total closed membership: 3054 (44.73%) Total membership (public only): 602661 Mean membership (public only): 101.90 (And if you're noticing that the counts are creeping up, that's because, as I've said, the script's running now, though the numbers are sufficiently solid I'm confident in leaking a set.) (Further update: a 2nd large community with 126,123 members has turned up.) In other news, I've been looking at present G+ public participation and the fortunes of the 4,214 active profiles I found in 2015, versus the attrition rate of Google's last-updated profiles sitemap from 2017-3-1. Of the latter set, 1.6% were unreachable, giving 404 errors when I attempted to scrape them. Of the 2015 sample, the 404 rate is 13.24%. That is, having an active profile in 2015 gives an 8.275x higher likelihood of having a dead account in 2018 than having any account in March of 2017. That's ... an interesting result. The constructive active, public participants in G+ are too small to be seen in my current 3,000 profile sample. That corresponds roughly to < 1 million such users, and given some other data (3,248 members of G+MM as I type this, 7,061 users on the Pluspora Diaspora pod, 33,066 signatures on the "Don't Shut Down Google Plus" Change.org petition), it seems that somewhere in the 10k - 100k range, possibly bumping toward 1m with lurkers, etc., is the likely solid core. A value I've suggested often. (And yes, aggreeing on definitions, and finding accessible and trustworthy metrics is difficult.) 1 217297 members 2 26389 members 3 23412 members 4 22953 members 5 16902 members 6 12763 members 7 11490 members 8 10321 members 9 8782 members 10 7406 members 11 6819 members 12 6704 members 13 5344 members 14 5148 members 15 4972 members 16 4624 members 17 4590 members 18 4142 members 19 3518 members 20 3368 members 21 3243 members 22 3177 members 23 3164 members 24 3158 members 25 3035 members 26 2973 members 27 2764 members 28 2507 members 29 2477 members 30 2474 members 31 2334 members 32 2226 members 33 2070 members 34 2029 members 35 1964 members 36 1745 members 37 1744 members 38 1720 members 39 1620 members 40 1614 members 41 1593 members 42 1563 members 43 1501 members 44 1458 members 45 1343 members 46 1266 members 47 1230 members 48 1196 members 49 1160 members 50 1155 members 51 1133 members 52 1084 members 53 1035 members 54 1025 members 55 1009 members 56 1008 members 57 978 members 58 964 members 59 957 members 60 924 members Reminder: these are partial results, values will vary a bit, though should be reasonably reliable.
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Commented on post by The Annoyed Atheist in Google+ Help+The Annoyed Atheist Did you see something like the screenshot above? You should end up with a zip file. Unzip that and you get a set of directories. At the top is an index.html file. Dig down and you get something like Takeout\Google+ Stream\Photos\Photos from posts\09-05-2017 And in there are some .jpg and .csv files. — I would like to know if there is anyway to mass download all of my photos to my personal computer? I looked in my Google photos and most of them are missing and I don't really want them on Google Photos. Is there anyway to download them totally without doing them one by one?
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Commented on post by The Annoyed Atheist in Google+ Help+The Annoyed Atheist https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — I would like to know if there is anyway to mass download all of my photos to my personal computer? I looked in my Google photos and most of them are missing and I don't really want them on Google Photos. Is there anyway to download them totally without doing them one by one?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationSomebody suggested Twitter/Reddit as the main parent source. These are long form posts so Twitter isn't a good source. And there's no RSS/Atom out from Twitter. The "Snowflake API" problem is that every major platform uses it's own API for both outgoing and incoming. If Incoming is even possible. Reddit is now quite unusual in that there's rss/atom for everything. — Once upon a time, I used to route G+ public posts to my blog, Twitter, Facebook. The idea was "Post once - Cross-post everywhere" . So I posted once on G+ and the system cross posted the article or a subset of it to all the other platforms. This originally used http://dlvr.it but then they stopped reading G+. I was never completely happy with the layout. And I needed to code for this in my own blog anyway, so I wrote a G+ post to Atom convertor. This gave me an Atom feed to push into http://dlvr.it as well as a source for my blog to auto-create posts. Then Facebook stopped allowing external apps to post on a personal timeline. This process always had to start with G+ because that didn't have a write API. It could only be a source for cross posting, not a sink. http://dlvr.it and IFTTT have become less and less useful as they monetise and keep reducing support for free users. Meanwhile, new systems started to turn up with their own APIs like Mastodon, Diaspora, Hubzilla, etc. But even though they use standardised protocols, they're still too small to get any traction with things like http://dlvr.it and IFTTT. And now G+ is closing down. So it can't even be a source any more. And there's no obvious way to get posts out of Facebook as they disabled Atom feeds out of Facebook long ago. So what with the snowflake API problem, free services getting monetised and closed and walled gardens adding barbed wire to the top of the walls, this approach is reaching the end of the road. Maybe the idea of "Post once - Cross-post everywhere" has become impossible. It's certainly hard to work out where to start.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Denis Wallez Well, let's look at this briefly. 1) I'm talking about multiple platforms, not multiple places within one platform. I'll get different engagement on G+, Twitter, Facebook, Mastodon for the same content. So do I cut and paste manually, or just automate the sh*t out of it? 2) If you have your notifications set up well, then you can engage with each new audience on each platform. Posting in multiple places doesn't mean you can't engage. 3) This is a really common SEO/Marketing approach for MSM. Do a post on your main publishing point, eg http://guardian.com. Copy/abstract, point to it from your account on each platform. But, maybe that's why so much of Twitter is write-only. 4) Given that G+ is closing down, cross posting every post to your own blog was a good choice to make sure your content was archived as you go along. 5) This is an old debate. Here's something from 2012 about G+'s missing write API. https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23/posts/JxY42qpjghh — Once upon a time, I used to route G+ public posts to my blog, Twitter, Facebook. The idea was "Post once - Cross-post everywhere" . So I posted once on G+ and the system cross posted the article or a subset of it to all the other platforms. This originally used http://dlvr.it but then they stopped reading G+. I was never completely happy with the layout. And I needed to code for this in my own blog anyway, so I wrote a G+ post to Atom convertor. This gave me an Atom feed to push into http://dlvr.it as well as a source for my blog to auto-create posts. Then Facebook stopped allowing external apps to post on a personal timeline. This process always had to start with G+ because that didn't have a write API. It could only be a source for cross posting, not a sink. http://dlvr.it and IFTTT have become less and less useful as they monetise and keep reducing support for free users. Meanwhile, new systems started to turn up with their own APIs like Mastodon, Diaspora, Hubzilla, etc. But even though they use standardised protocols, they're still too small to get any traction with things like http://dlvr.it and IFTTT. And now G+ is closing down. So it can't even be a source any more. And there's no obvious way to get posts out of Facebook as they disabled Atom feeds out of Facebook long ago. So what with the snowflake API problem, free services getting monetised and closed and walled gardens adding barbed wire to the top of the walls, this approach is reaching the end of the road. Maybe the idea of "Post once - Cross-post everywhere" has become impossible. It's certainly hard to work out where to start.
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Commented on post by Neil Sloan in Google+ HelpYou can always get the "Share Link" and then copy and paste into a G+ post. It still works as expected, they just removed the one click way of doing this. — How do I upload an album from Google Photos to Google +? Until last week I could do it automatically by clicking on the Google + symbol when I click on 'share.' But now the G+ symbol is gone. Any options?
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Commented on post by The Annoyed Atheist in Google+ Help+The Annoyed Atheist The instructions I gave are for G+ Photos. Not G Photos. As far as I am aware, the Takeout for G+ Photos works and is complete. At least it works for me. But note that https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout also has an entry for Google Photos. This should allow you to download Google Photos as well. So that gives you two routes to download G Photos AND G+Photos. Which should be everything. — I would like to know if there is anyway to mass download all of my photos to my personal computer? I looked in my Google photos and most of them are missing and I don't really want them on Google Photos. Is there anyway to download them totally without doing them one by one?
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Commented on post by The Annoyed Atheist in Google+ HelpGoogle Takeout, G+Streams, Select specific data, Google+ Stream data, Photos. This will let you download all your G+ Photos, now. — I would like to know if there is anyway to mass download all of my photos to my personal computer? I looked in my Google photos and most of them are missing and I don't really want them on Google Photos. Is there anyway to download them totally without doing them one by one?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI've mentioned this before relating to group forming. - 5 noisy people provides enough combinations for conspiracies where 4 is not quite enough. There's a big jump between 4 factorial and 5. 4! = 24 5! = 120. - 90-9-1. 90% lurk, 9% comment, 1% post. Suggests that while a group of 5 will probably keep going, somewhere around 50 people are needed for those 5 to emerge with fairly regular contribution from another 10 and occasional from the rest. - Dunbar. Somewhere between 100 and 250. Its possible for everyone in the group to recognise everyone else in the group. Meaning that there's a sweet spot for active groups between 50 and 250 people who are actively engaged. Less than 50 and the groups tend to die out unless they're a talking shop for close friends. Greater than 250 and the noise level gets too high and people stop paying attention. And they no longer recognise the contributors. Now apply that not just to systems with formal community-group function but to things like circles and followers. Any group-forming network. It's a common pattern among active people to create a carefully curated subset of people they follow closely and to only sip from the firehose occasionally. It's actually very rare for people to have high follow-follower counts and to also meaningfully engage. — The Facebook Era is Over It's more than just the Plexodus ...Here are three predictions: There’s no Facebook Killer. There will be no single company or app that will take Facebook on and win.... The three most obvious alternatives people are turning to are: Private Messaging Platforms.... Vertical Social Networks and Subscription Content.... Highly Curated, Professional-Led Podcasts, Email Newsletters, Events, and Membership Communities...With awesome experiences and low switching costs, time spent will fan out among hundreds, if not thousands of different services.... Growth halts on the edges, not the core. Facebook’s prominence is eroding as the sources of creativity and goodwill that gave it magic, substance, and cultural relevance are quietly moving on. The reality is that Facebook stopped giving creators a return on their time a long time ago.... Big brands will be the last to leave.... </quote> https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/facebook-era-over-gina-bianchini
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitAnd that's NumberWangLand! — Brexit outcome: Wangland. (Via @tsjessyjones)
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Commented on post by John Lewis in Google+ Mass Migration+Mike Noyes Please do post feedback asking for this. — Google TAKEOUT now. You should probably be doing a Google Takeout once a month. Just FYI, the format of the data keeps changing. We have people tracking this, but since Google is modifying what data is included and moving it around, you may want earlier or later copies. If you have the hard drive space, keep them with dates so you can refer back to older copies when you get a chance. The reason this is important is because all this data will most likely be gone after the close Google+. You'll probably have no way to look it up and if you ever wanted to migrate, this is the only way. We are currently recommending JSON as the format to take out in, but that might change. You can't really go wrong with JSON, as it ports easily to other formats... and programmers like to use this format. Questions? Ask in the comments.
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Commented on post by John Lewis in Google+ Mass Migration+Lars Hanisch Go here https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Click "select None" Scroll down to Google+ Circles and turn it on Click on the row Click on the drop down. Change vCard to JSON — Google TAKEOUT now. You should probably be doing a Google Takeout once a month. Just FYI, the format of the data keeps changing. We have people tracking this, but since Google is modifying what data is included and moving it around, you may want earlier or later copies. If you have the hard drive space, keep them with dates so you can refer back to older copies when you get a chance. The reason this is important is because all this data will most likely be gone after the close Google+. You'll probably have no way to look it up and if you ever wanted to migrate, this is the only way. We are currently recommending JSON as the format to take out in, but that might change. You can't really go wrong with JSON, as it ports easily to other formats... and programmers like to use this format. Questions? Ask in the comments.
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Commented on post by John Lewis in Google+ Mass MigrationThat article at http://seriot.ch is about parsing JSON at a base level. I'd expect G+ takeout's JSON to be sufficiently standard that any mainstream parser should construct the same data structure. But then given Google's difficulties with UTF filenames, maybe not! But that says nothing about Google's schema being totally different to the schemas required or produced by any other platform. This is the snowflake API problem where every platform uses JSON, but none of them use a common schema. — Google TAKEOUT now. You should probably be doing a Google Takeout once a month. Just FYI, the format of the data keeps changing. We have people tracking this, but since Google is modifying what data is included and moving it around, you may want earlier or later copies. If you have the hard drive space, keep them with dates so you can refer back to older copies when you get a chance. The reason this is important is because all this data will most likely be gone after the close Google+. You'll probably have no way to look it up and if you ever wanted to migrate, this is the only way. We are currently recommending JSON as the format to take out in, but that might change. You can't really go wrong with JSON, as it ports easily to other formats... and programmers like to use this format. Questions? Ask in the comments.
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Commented on post by John Lewis in Google+ Mass MigrationJSON =/= schema. — Google TAKEOUT now. You should probably be doing a Google Takeout once a month. Just FYI, the format of the data keeps changing. We have people tracking this, but since Google is modifying what data is included and moving it around, you may want earlier or later copies. If you have the hard drive space, keep them with dates so you can refer back to older copies when you get a chance. The reason this is important is because all this data will most likely be gone after the close Google+. You'll probably have no way to look it up and if you ever wanted to migrate, this is the only way. We are currently recommending JSON as the format to take out in, but that might change. You can't really go wrong with JSON, as it ports easily to other formats... and programmers like to use this format. Questions? Ask in the comments.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google+Is it worth trying the more generalised Google People API? It wasn't obvious to me that it was going to help. And using it is slightly more involved than the G+ API. — G+Takeout of Circles is now available in JSON. The problem is that there's very little info in there for each profile you've followed, { "firstName": "$First", "lastName": "$Last", "displayName": "$Display", "nickname": "$Nick", "profileUrl": "https://plus.google.com/$UserId" } So I figured you could work through them and use the $UserId to do a people.get lookup through the G+ API. That ought to fill in the gaps with all the publicly visible info that you can see on their profile. Except that quite a few of the documented fields in the API documentation don't appear because deprecated. And even data like email addresses are not returned even if the other user has them set to public. Is this a lost cause?
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Google+ Mass Migration+John Lewis I suppose change is quite likely. But so far we've only seen two minor changes in the last year or so. - activitylog fixed, when it was broken - Circles JSON added And that's it. — VCard Format and Google Takeout Just wanted to share a little tip, based on a mistake I made. When you are downloading Circles or Contacts using Google Takeout, you have the option to select CSV or VCF format. CSV is going to be more useful down the road, but the one thing that VCF is good for is importing into mail and address book clients. If you go the VCF route, you will see a bunch of files, each named after a G+ Circle (or if you are exporting from Contacts, it will be the various labels you might have used). It will look like a mistake and that Takeout didn't actually export the contacts. But all you have to do is double-click on that file and your address book should prompt you to import all the contacts for that specific Circle or Label. For example, I'm on a Mac and the below image was for my "Active Engagers" Circle here on G+. When I double click on it, the Apple Contacts app opens up and prompts to import the individual contacts for that circle. I at first thought that the export was flawed because the files were so small and the individual contacts are obvious. They are grouped and need to be opened up by the contact manager.
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Google+ Mass MigrationWell that's annoying. There are fields in the G+.people.get API docs that simply don't exist any more or are not delivered, even if the profile has them set to Public. So even if you work through adding API data to your circles download JSON, you'll never get any email addresses, for instance. https://developers.google.com/+/web/api/rest/latest/people { "kind": "plus#person", "etag": etag, "nickname": string, "occupation": string, "skills": string, "birthday": string, "gender": string, "emails": [], "urls": [ { "value": string, "type": string, "label": string } ], "objectType": string, "id": string, "displayName": string, "name": { "formatted": string, "familyName": string, "givenName": string, "middleName": string, "honorificPrefix": string, "honorificSuffix": string }, "tagline": string, "braggingRights": string, "aboutMe": string, "relationshipStatus": string, "url": string, "image": { "url": string, }, "organizations": [ { "name": string, "department": string, "title": string, "type": string, "startDate": string, "endDate": string, "location": string, "description": string, "primary": boolean } ], "placesLived": [ { "value": string, "primary": boolean } ], "isPlusUser": boolean, "language": string, "ageRange": { "min": integer, "max": integer }, "plusOneCount": integer, "circledByCount": integer, "verified": boolean, "cover": { "layout": string, "coverPhoto": { "url": string, "height": integer, "width": integer }, "coverInfo": { "topImageOffset": integer, "leftImageOffset": integer } }, "domain": string } — VCard Format and Google Takeout Just wanted to share a little tip, based on a mistake I made. When you are downloading Circles or Contacts using Google Takeout, you have the option to select CSV or VCF format. CSV is going to be more useful down the road, but the one thing that VCF is good for is importing into mail and address book clients. If you go the VCF route, you will see a bunch of files, each named after a G+ Circle (or if you are exporting from Contacts, it will be the various labels you might have used). It will look like a mistake and that Takeout didn't actually export the contacts. But all you have to do is double-click on that file and your address book should prompt you to import all the contacts for that specific Circle or Label. For example, I'm on a Mac and the below image was for my "Active Engagers" Circle here on G+. When I double click on it, the Apple Contacts app opens up and prompts to import the individual contacts for that circle. I at first thought that the export was flawed because the files were so small and the individual contacts are obvious. They are grouped and need to be opened up by the contact manager.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationArticle on Linkedin says Facebook is doomed and the last people there will be businesses. Why am I not surprised? Facebook has an evil side evil. And they have UI quirks which infuriate me. But they do have awesomely, massively, huge numbers of active people, groups, events, chat, posts, comments and all the rest. And conversations do happen there at least as good as here. It's may be evil in parts, but it's also good in parts. — The Facebook Era is Over It's more than just the Plexodus ...Here are three predictions: There’s no Facebook Killer. There will be no single company or app that will take Facebook on and win.... The three most obvious alternatives people are turning to are: Private Messaging Platforms.... Vertical Social Networks and Subscription Content.... Highly Curated, Professional-Led Podcasts, Email Newsletters, Events, and Membership Communities...With awesome experiences and low switching costs, time spent will fan out among hundreds, if not thousands of different services.... Growth halts on the edges, not the core. Facebook’s prominence is eroding as the sources of creativity and goodwill that gave it magic, substance, and cultural relevance are quietly moving on. The reality is that Facebook stopped giving creators a return on their time a long time ago.... Big brands will be the last to leave.... </quote> https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/facebook-era-over-gina-bianchini
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Commented on post by Akshaya Sampoorna Suresh in Google+ Help+Nina Trankova Do you have definitive information that it will not be possible to create a new Google Public Profile after Aug 2019? Note that you pointed at https://support.google.com/accounts#topic=3382296 which points to https://support.google.com/accounts/answer/6304920?hl=en-GB&ref_topic=3382296 which says "Control what others see about you across Google services" which points to https://aboutme.google.com/ Which is all about controlling your Public profile. And one of the places that is used on is G+. It's clearly closely linked to G+ but not completely and it is used elsewhere. I'm trying really hard here to be completely accurate. At the moment, we simply don't know what will happen to Google Profiles after 2019. There's been no official announcement of that level of detail. I can guess that since profiles pre-dated G+ and are used on other Google Products, not just on G+, they might survive in some form. But until we have something official, we don't know. — Will our accounts be deleted automatically after August 2019? If so,is it possible to create a new account after that ?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege+Adrian Colley If there's a hard border, we might need them. Actually, if Brexit happens we might need them on the mainland. — Johnson bought the crowd-control vehicles from the German police in 2014, in anticipation of social unrest, without checking whether they could be used on London’s streets. In one of his most humiliating episodes as mayor the then home secretary Theresa May banned them from use anywhere in England and Wales. It left the capital’s taxpayers with three expensive white elephants. [The Mayor's office] announced on Monday that it has agreed to sell the vehicles for just £11,025 to Reclamations Ollerton, a scrap metal yard in Newark, Nottinghamshire. The fee recoups 3.4% of the £322,834.71 spent on the vehicles since 2014.
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Commented on post by Akshaya Sampoorna Suresh in Google+ HelpYour Google Account is not quite the same as your Google+ Profile. And the Google Account is used right across all the Google products. It's only the consumer side of G+ that is closing down. So yes, accounts will almost certainly remain and it will almost certainly be possible to create a new one after Aug-2019. It's not clear if your publicly visible Google Profile will disappear with the G+Sunset. Google Profiles actually pre-date G+ and they might survive. As of now, we simply don't now. — Will our accounts be deleted automatically after August 2019? If so,is it possible to create a new account after that ?
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeAnybody want to buy the plans for a Garden Bridge over the Thames? One of the better bits of these stories is the new stereos fitted. I imagine a full Psy-Ops sound system capable of playing "Ride of the Valkyries" at 120dB. https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/dec/14/boris-johnsons-unused-water-cannon-were-fitted-with-1000-stereos — Johnson bought the crowd-control vehicles from the German police in 2014, in anticipation of social unrest, without checking whether they could be used on London’s streets. In one of his most humiliating episodes as mayor the then home secretary Theresa May banned them from use anywhere in England and Wales. It left the capital’s taxpayers with three expensive white elephants. [The Mayor's office] announced on Monday that it has agreed to sell the vehicles for just £11,025 to Reclamations Ollerton, a scrap metal yard in Newark, Nottinghamshire. The fee recoups 3.4% of the £322,834.71 spent on the vehicles since 2014.
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Commented on post by Yahuchanan Yakazqa'al Yashra'al in Google+ UpdatesNothing official, no. — ANYTHING NEW ON GOOGLE ➕ ABOUT THE SHUT DOWN?
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Commented on post by Fuxia Scholz in WordPressIs there an equivalent group on Facebook to this community? — Google will shut down Google+ soon. And with that, our community will come to an end. We will let it run as long as they let us. Right now I already want to thank you all for your contributions, and the open, friendly community we have enjoyed here. https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ Update: I have set up a group on MeWe that might work as a replacement: https://mewe.com/join/wordpress1
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Doug Senko Or, she's a crazy cat lady. cf Andrew Neil. — Tensions have been running a bit high, lately? Cabinet ministers were so concerned by Esther McVey 's behaviour during the crunch Brexit Cabinet meeting they thought security might have to be called, it has been claimed. Mcvey, who resigned from the Government on Wednesday in protest at Theresa May’s Brexit deal – is reported to have been embroiled in a furious confrontation with the Prime Minister during the mammoth five-hour meeting on Wednesday afternoon. One Minister present told The Mail on Sunday: ‘It was the most extraordinary meltdown I’ve seen in Cabinet. I thought security would have to be called, because she seemed so hysterical and aggressive. The Prime Minister tried to talk to her, but it was all just empty waffle which Esther talked over. So Julian [Smith, Chief Whip], just started shouting at her to shut up.’ Well, I for one am also a bit annoyed by all the empty waffle coming out of Theresa May's mouth. So I can relate. And Mr Smith seems to have learned how to run meetings from watching Trump TV. Anyway, too bad that they didn't call security. Pictures of a Brexit minister dragged out of Downing Street? Priceless.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google+Recently came across this code. It uses a couple of clever tricks to extract all the posts and comments from a community via the API. https://github.com/sdsalyer/gplus-archiver — The more I dig into this the more mind boggling I find the decision to sunset G+ - What happens to all those buttons, badges, embedded posts and signins for G+ on other websites? - How do you extract and archive content from within communities? - We now need APIs to extract and archive non-public data. And so on. Pretty much everything here is going to sunset as well. https://developers.google.com/+/web/
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Commented on post by Kevin Black in Google+ Mass Migration+Edward Morbius Well I didn't say it was easy! And we're seeing this problem with G+ posts on the Internet Archive. The recent deleted post has half a dozen snap shots, none of which show all the comments. — So, I moderate a Star Trek rewatch community on G+ (linked below for reference) that has about 500 episode reviews and discussion threads. I want to preserve the content of all the posts, inclusive of the comments, and translate it to a new site, which could be a standalone website (I'm looking at building one with Squarespace, with or without professional assistance). I used Takeout to download the content of my community in HTML format, but with regard to the posts, it seems to just give me a list of links to each of them on G+. Which is helpful, but I think those links will no longer be active once G+ is no more? I'm confused about how to make this functional as an archive I can use to rebuild the content on a different platform. Suggestions or assistance are welcome!
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Commented on post by Jenny-Gabriela Kolonaty in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearYoutube stopped pointing at their own G+ profile at the bottom of their LH sidebar.
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Commented on post by Kevin Black in Google+ Mass MigrationAnother inconsistency from Google. The API let's you download any post in full with all its comments if you have permission to view it. This is exactly the call used in the Salyer code above to download a community. So Google provides tools that can be used to download all of a community's posts and comments but doesn't provide a tool to explicitly download it. Indeed there is a case that if the data is visible to you in html, then there is nothing to stop you scraping the web page. It's just awkward. And Google does give you a list of the URLs to go to. It's really not hard to construct social circumstances where an archive of a community can be collected and posted elsewhere with full agreement from the participants (or lack of refusal). And there is a solid use case for wanting to do that in the current situation where it is at risk of disappearing completely. So again, I don't buy the copyright viewpoint that it's not your data to download. And I don't buy the Google policy argument that Google has a policy to not give you data that wasn't posted by you. So I'm left with Takeout.G+Community being useless and posting feedback asking them to improve it. — So, I moderate a Star Trek rewatch community on G+ (linked below for reference) that has about 500 episode reviews and discussion threads. I want to preserve the content of all the posts, inclusive of the comments, and translate it to a new site, which could be a standalone website (I'm looking at building one with Squarespace, with or without professional assistance). I used Takeout to download the content of my community in HTML format, but with regard to the posts, it seems to just give me a list of links to each of them on G+. Which is helpful, but I think those links will no longer be active once G+ is no more? I'm confused about how to make this functional as an archive I can use to rebuild the content on a different platform. Suggestions or assistance are welcome!
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Commented on post by Kevin Black in Google+ Mass Migration+John Skeats Logical. But like many things G+ there are some inconsistencies. For instance, activitylog gives you comments you posted with the full text of the Post you commented on. So does +1s in activitylog. Personally, I don't buy this argument. As a community owner, I consider that I own the content posted by others in my community. Somewhere in here is mention of code written by a third party to download a community. https://github.com/sdsalyer/gplus-archiver — So, I moderate a Star Trek rewatch community on G+ (linked below for reference) that has about 500 episode reviews and discussion threads. I want to preserve the content of all the posts, inclusive of the comments, and translate it to a new site, which could be a standalone website (I'm looking at building one with Squarespace, with or without professional assistance). I used Takeout to download the content of my community in HTML format, but with regard to the posts, it seems to just give me a list of links to each of them on G+. Which is helpful, but I think those links will no longer be active once G+ is no more? I'm confused about how to make this functional as an archive I can use to rebuild the content on a different platform. Suggestions or assistance are welcome!
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Commented on post by James Lamb in Google+ Mass MigrationCustom RSS/Atom feed aggregators? You can pretty much do this just with a curated OPML feed list. — The apps deliver curated partisan news feeds on what are effectively private social media platforms, free from the strictures and content guidelines imposed by Silicon Valley giants. The NRA app has 150,000 downloads. Apps monitored by AggregateIQ, a subsidiary of Cambridge Analytica.
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Commented on post by Bill Brayman in Google+ Mass MigrationYou can't leave these out. Photo Sharing: Flickr Blogging: Blogger — My take on g+ alternative and related platforms. Comments invited. A few startup open source platforms not included, such as Social Home, Pleroma, etc. Also Reddit isn't included because it isn't stream/feed oriented.
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Commented on post by Randy Culler in Google+ Mass Migrationhttps://twitter.com/cshirky still posting. As well as the ones that went quiet, were the ones that everyone followed but never did post in the first place. https://twitter.com/cshirky?lang=en — Early Google+ influencers remember the network's early glory days, and what led to its eventual demise. A discussion on Cake led by +Trey Ratcliff
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Commented on post by John Lewis in Google+ Mass MigrationJust what we need. Another Google messaging system. — Google replacing Google+ sharing in the wild YouTube just added YouTube messaging for sharing. You can ignore this video, it was just a way for me to access the link. Obviously it's in Google's best interest to replace any location where you could previously G+ share with something new. So have you tried the YouTube messaging? What do you think to far?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitDisgraced Former Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson met Disgraced Former Leader of UKIP, Nigel Farage in Boisdale of Belgravia, a traditional Scottish restaurant with a variety of whiskies, a cigar terrace and live jazz. And the consequence was? — In the meantime, Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage have dinner together.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+D Doc Which is why I keep calling it UK-Exit. To remind people that Brexit is not just about England but the whole of the UK. — Sky Data poll from today. Which Brexit outcome would you prefer? No Brexit - 54% No deal - 32% May's deal - 14% Should we have a second EU referendum? Yes - 55% No - 35% Who would you prefer to lead the country through Brexit? Theresa May - 31% Jeremy Corbyn - 25% Jacob Rees-Mogg - 18% Boris Johnson - 17% Dominic Raab - 10% This is all reasonably encouraging, except for the last question, where 45% of all polled are in favour of Moggie, Dom, or Boris. Whats the plan here? Barreling full force towards a Mad Max future?
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Google+ Mass MigrationOn my list of code that needs writing. Take the Takeout.G+Circles.json, extract the profile URLs, extract the user ID from each URL, use that to do a G+Api.people.get call to populate and then write out a much enhanced JSON/VCF file. — VCard Format and Google Takeout Just wanted to share a little tip, based on a mistake I made. When you are downloading Circles or Contacts using Google Takeout, you have the option to select CSV or VCF format. CSV is going to be more useful down the road, but the one thing that VCF is good for is importing into mail and address book clients. If you go the VCF route, you will see a bunch of files, each named after a G+ Circle (or if you are exporting from Contacts, it will be the various labels you might have used). It will look like a mistake and that Takeout didn't actually export the contacts. But all you have to do is double-click on that file and your address book should prompt you to import all the contacts for that specific Circle or Label. For example, I'm on a Mac and the below image was for my "Active Engagers" Circle here on G+. When I double click on it, the Apple Contacts app opens up and prompts to import the individual contacts for that circle. I at first thought that the export was flawed because the files were so small and the individual contacts are obvious. They are grouped and need to be opened up by the contact manager.
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Commented on post by Randy Culler in Google+ Mass MigrationNot sure if this is relevant or not. If you work through that list of 2011 Tech Influencers and try and find them now. You'll see a few of them on Facebook and Twitter, often with no posts for a year or two. But you probably won't find any of them on platforms like Mastodon or Diaspora. Rather too many in there that have fallen from grace since then as well. — Early Google+ influencers remember the network's early glory days, and what led to its eventual demise. A discussion on Cake led by +Trey Ratcliff
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Commented on post by Drew Olanoff/s — Sounds like this is the end, folks. https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ I enjoyed using and covering Google+ quite a bit. I met some of the folks who built it, worked on it and gave their all to make a great and safe tool for communities to flourish. It's a bummer that it just never hooked folks. I think we've all learned a lot about "social networking" and the connecting everyone at scale approach appears to have been the wrong one. Here's to new ideas. RIP G+
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Commented on post by Jon Kitchen in Google+ Help+Jon Kitchen Your posts from today, like https://plus.google.com/+JonKitchenMusic68908/posts/FNm4nxNLXDX look to me like they're working as expected. G+ is picking up a main photo from the first included link and displaying it in the G+ Post. On desktop web. Looks fine to me. — Where are the photos that used to be shared with most articles? It's beginning to be that all articles are bald and have no Media whatsoever!
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Commented on post by Jon Kitchen in Google+ HelpThere are tools out there to turn your own G+ posts into an Atom feed. There are then tools to take this Atom feed and cross post it to other platforms like Twitter and Facebook. Many platforms like Wordpress will also auto-post from an Atom feed. There are tools like http://dlvr.it and IFTTT that can automate all this as a service. However, G+ Is going to come to an end in Aug 2019. And the big platforms are making it increasingly difficult to auto-crosspost into them. — How do I share photos and articles from Google Plus to other sites?
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Commented on post by Lar Yungmann in Google+ Help+Walter Roberson Someone in Google just might think about merging Google+ into GoogleGroups. It's unlikely though. — I cannot find a google suggestion from google search about a replacement for Google plus being offered by Google after killing the only social site i use on the web which still is google+. Any suggestions from anyone who is NOT an employee of google Google or even GOOGLE?
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Commented on post by 1wolny1 in Google+ HelpUK. 1) Go to a photo in G Photos. Chose Share. There is no explicit icon for G+ although there is FB and Twitter. But you can get a link, go to G+, start a post and paste the link. The photo is imported. 2) Go to G+ and start a post. Click on add a photo. Your G Photos are already there to be chosen. — Looks like G Photos are not providing direct sharing to G+ anymore. But you can share to Facebook & Twitter :) Nice move Google.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWrong metaphor. It should have been the Berlin Airlift. Where the US flies in tins of Ambrosia Creamed Rice using sub-contracted Chinese shipping companies. — Tweet by Paul Sweeney, Labour MP: Just turned on #bbcqt [BBC Question Time] there to hear an audience member declare: "we survived being blockaded by German U-boats during the war, I'm sure we'll survive a Brexit no deal." 😯🙄...Oh well, that's just fine then. QT never fails to remind you why Parliamentary democracy is a good idea. Brexit: only slightly worse than WW2. And the gammons are the first to volunteer, of course.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThere's nobody to lead us. So we'll just continue bumbling along trying to make the best of it. And we'll end up with a middle, muddle, fiddle, faddle, where we leave the EU without leaving any of its institutions or agreements. In the belief that over the next 81 years we can somehow negotiate our way to something better. BINO, here we come. Can I just remind everyone again, that "No UK-Exit is better than any Bad UK-Exit". I keep saying UK-Exit instead of Brexit to try and remind everyone again that it's the whole of the UK that is leaving, not just Great Britain. — Sky Data poll from today. Which Brexit outcome would you prefer? No Brexit - 54% No deal - 32% May's deal - 14% Should we have a second EU referendum? Yes - 55% No - 35% Who would you prefer to lead the country through Brexit? Theresa May - 31% Jeremy Corbyn - 25% Jacob Rees-Mogg - 18% Boris Johnson - 17% Dominic Raab - 10% This is all reasonably encouraging, except for the last question, where 45% of all polled are in favour of Moggie, Dom, or Boris. Whats the plan here? Barreling full force towards a Mad Max future?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitHaving trouble keeping score. - Shailesh Vara - Dominic Raab - Esther McVey - Suella Braverman - Anne-Marie Trevelyan - Ranil Jayawardena - Rehman Chishti Next? https://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2018/nov/15/brexit-deal-theresa-may-takes-agreement-to-parliament-politics-live?page=with:block-5bed6a01e4b0bb700a72d604#block-5bed6a01e4b0bb700a72d604 — Another one bites the dust. Dominic "I didn't realise that Dover was so important" Raab just resigned.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Plussology & Plexology: Google MetaWe call him "Little Bobby Tables" — Well that is an interesting G+ profile https://plus.google.com/104245738338629634202
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Commented on post by Kevin Van Sant in Google+ HelpIf you're unlucky enough to get one of these messages, what are you supposed to do with the Content identifier? Is there any way of getting from this message to the specific content that is causing the problem? — I got the email below. The only thing I use google+ for is to post about watch faces I make for smart watches. I only post it to my own "collection" and then share that post with one appropriate community one time. So either this was an error or else someone with too much time on their hands decided it would be fun to falsely report a post as spam. How do I get google+ to undo this error, and how to I use that identifier to determine what post was flagged? Hello, Your Google+ content has violated the Google+ User Content and Conduct Policy, which is against the Google+ Terms of Service. As such, your content has been removed or blocked. Content type: Post or comment Reason for removal: Spam Content identifier: z12xffogalbsx3k5504ccrxg1ryjxj5ybxw0k Certain removal reasons may result in your content being visible either only to you, or only in certain countries. Sincerely, The Google+ Team
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Commented on post by Denise Lane in Google+ HelpWhat actually happened to Google Events? ISTR it was split off from G+ like Photos and Hangouts, but then became beta-only or something. I don't feel like I've seen it for ages. — Ingress requires us to post our First Saturday events in Google+ however right now when you try it is telling us that only a set subset of users may post. What can we do?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is Near+Julian Bond Wee! https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23/posts/JxY42qpjghh Me talking about a post from Drew Olanoff, that gets a comment from Gundrota (and me) about the perils of a Write API for G+ and cross posting. How times have changed. Except that the post really didn't get any actual engagement. — On Flukish Predictions
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearGoogle takeout. Then scan what you were writing in 2012. Somewhat scary, and only 6 years ago! — On Flukish Predictions
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Commented on post by Phil Anthony in G+ RPG Escape RocketStrongly recommend creating a list of links to all your profiles on Social Media platforms and putting it somewhere obvious. Then referring to it in the about text of each profile. Make yourself easy to find. https://plus.google.com/u/0/+JulianBond23/posts/VghLTMV6vAS — How to create social media buttons on a blog, with examples for MeWe, Pluspora and more.
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Commented on post by Government GangStalking and Electronic Harassment in Google+ HelpI'm finding the current Takeout to be variable. I've had some success with G+Stream.Posts.html The files are quite usable. However there are some quirks with filenames and the main index needed remaking. Circles and Community were pretty useless. G+Stream.activitylog.html is all bit strange and hard to process. There are lots of issues here, but a major one is that the Takeout files make numerous references back into G+ — Now that Google Plus will be shutting down, I would like to know of an easy way that I can migrate the data of my Google Plus into any other social media platform, whatever that maybe, ..be it Facebook of Twitter or other How can I migrate each of my Google Plus collections into a Facebook page and so on..!! If this is not possible, I wonder if Google Plus will make this possible soon as part of their closing down help duty perhaps..!! Thanks Eleni
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Commented on post by Government GangStalking and Electronic Harassment in Google+ Help+Eric Peña Can you recommend the best place:- - To discuss issues, approaches and successes with G+ Takeout - To discuss development associated with using Takeout files. Particularly with reference to moving the data to other platforms. - To discuss issues, approaches with combining G+ Takeout with the G+ API. Is this the best community to have these discussions, along with the "Developing with G+" community, or should we be going somewhere else? https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/113527920160449995981 I haven't been able to find any productforums or googlegroups that are appropriate. And this is by far the largest and most active G+ Help community. — Now that Google Plus will be shutting down, I would like to know of an easy way that I can migrate the data of my Google Plus into any other social media platform, whatever that maybe, ..be it Facebook of Twitter or other How can I migrate each of my Google Plus collections into a Facebook page and so on..!! If this is not possible, I wonder if Google Plus will make this possible soon as part of their closing down help duty perhaps..!! Thanks Eleni
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearNever mind the API limits. What Google should do is provide a useful and complete Takeout function for G+ Communities. If they're serious about providing "ways they can download and migrate their data." then they need to do this for communities and community owners as well. — Google Plus Archiver: gplus-archiver This is a PHP-based tool which queries the G+ API and can archive entire communities as JSON files, created by +Spencer Salyer. There is a 10,000 query/day limit imposed by Google on Google+ activity and you can cut through that quickly. I've not tested this, looking for folks who can/will. There's a set of archived communities as an example at: https://wispsoftime.com/gplus-archiver/ His notes follow: It is PHP code to query the G+ API with the community ID and loop through all the posts and comments, storing them as json files (one per post). It can eat through their 10k query/day limit quickly depending on the community, so I disabled the form on the live site. I'd be happy to take requests for archival, though. It should be every post and associated comments in each community, with info for photos and attachments, etc. I'm not actually downloading attachments, so much of that is still hosted at Google. It's still a bit of a work in progress, but I thought it better to download what I could as soon as I could. The code is here, if it's helpful: https://github.com/sdsalyer/gplus-archiver
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Commented on post by Derek Lynch in Google+ Help+Mike Noyes The PHP stuff came from https://plus.google.com/+SDSalyer You should talk to him directly. I honestly don't know. The Takeout JSON, def not. — What happens to Community content after G+ closes? When does that happen?
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeBig, if true. So, The Brexit Secretary is working in direct opposition to his responsiblities? https://www.gov.uk/government/ministers/secretary-of-state-for-exiting-the-european-union Surely, that's a sacking offence. Oh. Wait. — Well, let the battle commence. Raab and May into the thunderdome.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google+Came across this today. PHP code to archive a whole community to JSON. https://github.com/sdsalyer/gplus-archiver — Code that needs writing related to the G+Sunset - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Blogger - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Atom - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Wordpress - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Reddit - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Other platforms that have an import or post API - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Static HTML as a better alternative to that provided by Google. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > Extract <body> section to files. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > <body> in markdown. - Takeout.G+Streams.Circles - > Enhanced VCard/CSV with additional data via G+API.people.get - Takeout - fix the filenames to deal with UTF-8 characters - Find My G+ Contacts on platform XXX. Like https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ - G+Community -> Archive of all the posts and comments Maybe Google will provide some of this. Like Atom output and one click migration to Blogger. More likely is that the community will cobble something together from the takeout files and Apis. G+ Takeout data structure documentation reverse engineered https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Data_Migration_Process_and_Considerations#Takeout_Data_Structure Some experiences http://blog.kugelfish.com/2018/10/google-migration-part-i-takeout.html https://blog.kugelfish.com/2018/10/google-migration-part-ii-understanding.htmlhttps://blog.kugelfish.com/2018/11/g-migration-part-iii-content.html More discussion in this community stream. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772/stream/365899e1-ee8d-4152-8353-c5dbb3a76ad7 And specifically this post https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23/posts/Svw8EAh21aE The Takeout feedback form is hard to find. It's here. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThe linkage between general (tribal) party politics and single issue voting is infuriating. Both among the public and in the two houses. And trying to summarise why an individual voted remain seems hard let alone en masse. — The article starts by looking at the UK Liberal Democrats and their recent electoral performance and strategies, but the hammer hits when it turns on who the 48% Remain voters really are. The 48% (and perhaps increasing!) is unlikely to be made up from dedicated Europhiles. Indeed one of the core messages from the Remain campaign had been that the EU was far from perfect and could be reformed. The vast majority of British relations with Europe since 1975 had also been presented as a battle against the more damaging instincts of Brussels and the wider European project. Simply put, the 48% contains a large residue of reluctant or contingent support for the EU as the lesser of two bad options. A further slice of the 48% might have democratic issues with trying to overturn the result. There are likely to be Remainers who feel that once a decision was reached in the Referendum it is necessary to abide with the result. A third portion of the 48% is likely to constitute those voters who, on balance, preferred to stay in the EU but whose party politics are defined by other issues. It is possible to be an ardent Remainer but also think that other issues – austerity, unemployment, health, immigration – are the ones that determine vote choice in an election rather than a binary on/off, in/out, yes/no referendum. A good bit of hypothesizing, and I would like to see some numbers here. But the first and the third paragraph feel right. There are, maybe, three groups of Remainers: (a) Reluctant Remainers who cling to the EU in a resigned manner and would like to save their marriage; (b) Party animals who accidentally vote pro-EU when their preferred party takes a pro-EU stance; (c) Europhiles: the true citizens of nowhere. Europe first, UK second. Type c seems to be hard to find, except of course among the metropolitan avocado-eating champaign slurping pinko commie hippie socialist cultural elite. Thats not a good start for a relationship.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearDid G+MKaTS disappear completely? Just wondering if that could be used as a test case. Except that I assume it only works on communities where the posts are public. — Google Plus Archiver: gplus-archiver This is a PHP-based tool which queries the G+ API and can archive entire communities as JSON files, created by +Spencer Salyer. There is a 10,000 query/day limit imposed by Google on Google+ activity and you can cut through that quickly. I've not tested this, looking for folks who can/will. There's a set of archived communities as an example at: https://wispsoftime.com/gplus-archiver/ His notes follow: It is PHP code to query the G+ API with the community ID and loop through all the posts and comments, storing them as json files (one per post). It can eat through their 10k query/day limit quickly depending on the community, so I disabled the form on the live site. I'd be happy to take requests for archival, though. It should be every post and associated comments in each community, with info for photos and attachments, etc. I'm not actually downloading attachments, so much of that is still hosted at Google. It's still a bit of a work in progress, but I thought it better to download what I could as soon as I could. The code is here, if it's helpful: https://github.com/sdsalyer/gplus-archiver
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Commented on post by Derek Lynch in Google+ HelpCurrently there's no real way to archive a community. There is a takeout.Google+ Communities here https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout However, it's only available to community owners. And the data is minimal at best being a set of vcards of members (each with very little data) and a set of URLs to the posts. And even with the API there's no way to get from the URL to an activity ID to query the actual content of the post and it's comments. It's highly likely that those URLs will disappear and 404 at some stage after the +Sunset. If archiving community as a community owner is important to you, I'd strongly recommend leaving feedback asking for a much more robust tool from Google Takeout. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback Today I came across 3rd party PHP code that uses the API to download a complete archive of a community to JSON. https://github.com/sdsalyer/gplus-archiver As for what happens at the G+Sunset, at the moment we simply don't know. It seems highly likely that the user UI will become at least read only after Aug 2019. At some stage after that the data will likely disappear. Again, at some stage after that takeout will become unavailable and the API will stop working. But the devil is in the details and at the moment, we haven't been given any details. An example of those details is the question of what happens to G+Profiles including their avatars. — What happens to Community content after G+ closes? When does that happen?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass Migration/s
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Commented on post by Filip H.F. Slagter in Google+ Mass MigrationSaw this earlier. https://www.androidcentral.com/ingress-has-huge-google-problem — Augmented/Alternate Reality Game Developer Niantic about Google+ Shutting Down I was reading an article about one of the leading developers in the field of Augmented/Alternate Reality Games, Niantic, known for games such as Ingress, Ingress Prime, Pokémon GO and the upcoming Harry Poter ARG Wizards Unite, about the development process of Ingress Prime, and they had the following to say about Google+ shutting down: A challenge for us was that Ingress was originally launched inside Google around the time that Google+ was launched. We launched the game to Google beta testers, which was a pretty tight group of a few tens of thousands of people who were vetted by Google. We launched on Android only. The Ingress community naturally sprung up, originally, on Google+. It’s persisted there. If you think about Google+ as this shopping mall where everybody’s left, there’s one anchor store in the corner that still has a huge amount of activity. It’s the Ingress store. And now the mall is closing. The realtors have decided to bring in the wrecking ball. [laughs] It’s a challenge for us to figure out how to help Ingress find that new version of–the Silph Road is obviously huge on Pokemon Go. That has to happen. We frankly acknowledge that’s something that we have to help with. It’s a challenge to help that get transplanted to a new home. (emphasis mine) https://venturebeat.com/2018/11/11/how-niantic-designers-tackled-ingress-prime-reboot/amp/ As an Ingress player, I'm interested in seeing how +Niantic will try to help us find a new home.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Edward Morbius I'm planning on using a pair of "Don't Panic" brand, peril-sensitive sunglasses . https://twitter.com/hackaday/status/1060604136872382465 — There is a plan?
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Commented on post by Chuck Bartok in Google+ Help+RavenX As always, the devil is in the details. And as yet, we don't have any. — Question regarding Recently, we made the decision to sunset the consumer version of Google+. What is the consumer version and what wil be left?
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Commented on post by Xavier CHAMOISEAU in Google+ Mass Migrationps. https://pluspora.com/people/cb0c4640c8370136849e005056264835 — Anyone already on Pluspora, let me find you! gojita972@pluspora.com https://pluspora.com/i/bc8a85c383ce
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Commented on post by Xavier CHAMOISEAU in Google+ Mass MigrationSomething I'm finding mildly annoying about the federation. You follow a link to somebody's profile page on one instance. But your home instance is on another one and you're logged in over there, not here. The process of following the person currently on the screen then becomes convoluted and non-obvious. I've had this with Mastodon and with Diaspora. Th quickest solution seems to be to copy their name, go into your logged in tab on your home instance and search for them. Maybe I'm doing it wrong. — Anyone already on Pluspora, let me find you! gojita972@pluspora.com https://pluspora.com/i/bc8a85c383ce
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Commented on post by felicia osaji in Google+ Helphttps://plus.google.com/u/0/apps/activities — Good morning everyone, please whr do I go to get activity log on G+??
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeIt's a Bhutan Buddhist thing. They're usually a bit better at it. https://zru9o3ijb9-flywheel.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/fertility.jpg — Meanwhile, in Manchester...
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Commented on post by Bernhard Suter in Google+ Mass MigrationI'm struggling a bit with how to format G+ JSON output as a flat archive in some other system. The Takeout HTML is quite a good and complete example of how to lay this out. But it seems quite a lot of work to recreate it. And it's going to be littered with links that may 404 after the G+ Sunset. I'd strongly recommend comparing the HTML, JSON and your translated JSON for a specific post. — Simple proof of concept on how to reformat G+ posts in the JSON takeout archive into a post for Diaspora*
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Google+ Mass Migration+Gideon Rosenblatt I didn't notice it until you mentioned it today. My last test run on Circles was 22-Oct-2018. — VCard Format and Google Takeout Just wanted to share a little tip, based on a mistake I made. When you are downloading Circles or Contacts using Google Takeout, you have the option to select CSV or VCF format. CSV is going to be more useful down the road, but the one thing that VCF is good for is importing into mail and address book clients. If you go the VCF route, you will see a bunch of files, each named after a G+ Circle (or if you are exporting from Contacts, it will be the various labels you might have used). It will look like a mistake and that Takeout didn't actually export the contacts. But all you have to do is double-click on that file and your address book should prompt you to import all the contacts for that specific Circle or Label. For example, I'm on a Mac and the below image was for my "Active Engagers" Circle here on G+. When I double click on it, the Apple Contacts app opens up and prompts to import the individual contacts for that circle. I at first thought that the export was flawed because the files were so small and the individual contacts are obvious. They are grouped and need to be opened up by the contact manager.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Updates+Julie Wills I would hope so. And of course we need the improvements well before August if we're going to have time to actually use them. And of course, I'd encourage everyone to post feedback. The Takeout feedback form is quite hard to find. It's here. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback — Some Questions for Google about the G+ Sunset. Any idea on how we get answers? - What happens to G+ Profiles? And the URL they exist on. - Will there be a publicly visible version of a Google Account "About Me" information? - Will G+ content stay up on the web read only? As a permanent fixture or for a period of transition time? - Will there be any tools provided by Google to do something useful with Takeout of G+ content and import into other systems? eg http://Blogger.com - Is there any chance of getting enhancements done to Takeout prior to the G+ sunset? I have a specific need to get post.activityID added to post.url in the G+stream JSON so I can use it as the Unique ID in the G+ API. I'm sure you have others.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ UpdatesBig old post about the issues. https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/JFqzxiq6Crx — It's coming up to the first month since the announcement of the G+ Sunset. We've had no further information from Google. The announcement posts all have comments disabled. We have a lot of questions about the process. It would be really helpful if a representative of Google took part in an AMA to try and clarify these issues. https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/N5cNimR6jHj
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Google+ Mass MigrationYes. JSON is new. The VCF files (and the other formats) are small because there's very little in them. BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:4.0 FN:$fullName N:$lastName;$firstName NICKNAME:$nickname URL:$googlePlusProfileUrl END:VCARD And that's it. I * think * but I'm not certain that if you import these into Google Contacts, it uses the Url and the G+API to lookup and get all the other public contact info. $googlePlusProfileUrl is sufficient to do this. At the moment, I'd recommend this route get as much as possible into Google.Contacts from available sources and then export it to some other contacts file. Which suggests more code to write! Take the Takeout.G+Circles.JSON code and add all the data you can get from the G+Api.people.get call to produce a much bigger JSON contacts file. ps. JSON option is broken. It actually produces the same old, same old, HTML. I guess it's a work in progress. — VCard Format and Google Takeout Just wanted to share a little tip, based on a mistake I made. When you are downloading Circles or Contacts using Google Takeout, you have the option to select CSV or VCF format. CSV is going to be more useful down the road, but the one thing that VCF is good for is importing into mail and address book clients. If you go the VCF route, you will see a bunch of files, each named after a G+ Circle (or if you are exporting from Contacts, it will be the various labels you might have used). It will look like a mistake and that Takeout didn't actually export the contacts. But all you have to do is double-click on that file and your address book should prompt you to import all the contacts for that specific Circle or Label. For example, I'm on a Mac and the below image was for my "Active Engagers" Circle here on G+. When I double click on it, the Apple Contacts app opens up and prompts to import the individual contacts for that circle. I at first thought that the export was flawed because the files were so small and the individual contacts are obvious. They are grouped and need to be opened up by the contact manager.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Mixology 🍸I still had some Xocolatl Mole bitters left over from a pack of The Bitter Truth Travelling Bitter Set. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bitter-Truth-Bar-Pack-Bitters/dp/B01I1XO4IG/ref=pd_sbs_370_8 — Saturday Night Cocktail - Right Hand To be drunk while listening to Nick Cave - Red Right Hand. It's a Rum Negroni more or less. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrxePKps87k http://barnotes.co/recipes/right-hand-cocktail There's the usual problem with translating US quantities but this seems to work. - 50ml dark-ish, old-ish rum - 20ml Campari - 20ml Red Vermouth - 2 dashes (12 drops) Xocolatl Mole or Chocolate Bitters - Rocks glass, Stirred, rocks, orange slice. Makes a change.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Alexander Goeres But which one is the evil twin? — Jo Johnson has resigned as a transport minister, saying the country is "barrelling towards an incoherent Brexit" and calling for another referendum. The Orpington MP said that "given that the reality of Brexit has turned out to be so far from what was once promised, the democratic thing to do is to give the public the final say". Mr Johnson added his brother Boris, the chief Brexit campaigner and former foreign secretary, is "as unhappy with the government's proposals as I am". Can't complain about this Brexit TV series. Each time you think it gets a bit boring the writers throw in something from the left field.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThis post is not about the USA. — Yes, the UK has a government minister who hasn't realised that Britain is an island. The UK also has Northern Ireland secretary who doesn't understand how elections in Northern Ireland work. (A point of ignorance that could get you kneecapped, back in the days.) Behold the government of the talentless. May’s government is the obnoxious hatchback driver in the Ferrari baseball cap, with negotiators such as Davis veering from ill-mannered to unrealistic. It has squandered much of the negotiating period since article 50 was triggered, acting like its bumper sports the legend “MY OTHER COUNTRY IS A SUPERPOWER”. Incidentally, from the clown car to the car being driven knowingly over a cliff, it’s striking how many of the most apposite Brexit metaphors are car-related. Or, as the more literal leading Brexiteer economist Patrick Minford put it the other week: “You’re going to have to run [the car industry] down, in the same way we ran down the coal and steel industry. These things happen.” The post-imperial hangover wasn't. Britain was still drunk. And still is. The real hangover is going to be murderous.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitMy wife and daughter are planning a weekend trip to Florence in April 2019. I suggested they plan on taking the train since there won't be any flights. And to allow enough time to get Visas. They should probably get their Euros now as well. — The great stockpiling has begun. Wild Water's Cardiff warehouse has capacity for 17,000 pallets. Across all its storage sites it is storing 40,000 pallets. [...] The company has now bought a 12-acre former wrapping paper factory in Aberbargoed and is converting it into another cold storage centre, which will cost £1.7m, with £500,000 over five years coming from the Welsh Government. It aims to employ 120 people within 18 months. Brexit creates jobs. In storage warehouses.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitFull text. https://medium.com/@JoJohnsonUK/why-i-cannot-support-the-governments-proposed-brexit-deal-3d289f95f2bc — Jo Johnson has resigned as a transport minister, saying the country is "barrelling towards an incoherent Brexit" and calling for another referendum. The Orpington MP said that "given that the reality of Brexit has turned out to be so far from what was once promised, the democratic thing to do is to give the public the final say". Mr Johnson added his brother Boris, the chief Brexit campaigner and former foreign secretary, is "as unhappy with the government's proposals as I am". Can't complain about this Brexit TV series. Each time you think it gets a bit boring the writers throw in something from the left field.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitSinking Ship-Rats. But they're not in the harbour. And safety isn't just a short swim away. — Jo Johnson has resigned as a transport minister, saying the country is "barrelling towards an incoherent Brexit" and calling for another referendum. The Orpington MP said that "given that the reality of Brexit has turned out to be so far from what was once promised, the democratic thing to do is to give the public the final say". Mr Johnson added his brother Boris, the chief Brexit campaigner and former foreign secretary, is "as unhappy with the government's proposals as I am". Can't complain about this Brexit TV series. Each time you think it gets a bit boring the writers throw in something from the left field.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Magnus Lewan What a great moment to be releasing "Outlaw King" on Netflix about Edward I, "Hammer of the Scots" and Robert the Bruce. — I wonder who told Theresa May to try block a court case that could have allowed the UK to call off Brexit? I mean, why would she do that, right?
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderAnd Neil Young. But mostly, what about Beyoncé. Because Empress Bey IS already in charge of the planet. And David Guetta (to pick a name out of the Dance Music hat). Because there's a whole generation who have no idea who Bowie or Lennon were but are having it large to their own heroes. — Imagine if we had David Bowie, Freddy Mercury, John Lennon, Leonard Cohen, Aretha Franklin, Prince and so many other music heroes in charge of our planet. Even if they fucked it up totally, they would have done a way better job than the shits in charge now, and it would have been a bloody fun ride!
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitNote what he didn't say: "You’re going to have to run the Finance Industry down, in the same way we ran down the coal and steel industry. These things happen.” But these things happen. — Yes, the UK has a government minister who hasn't realised that Britain is an island. The UK also has Northern Ireland secretary who doesn't understand how elections in Northern Ireland work. (A point of ignorance that could get you kneecapped, back in the days.) Behold the government of the talentless. May’s government is the obnoxious hatchback driver in the Ferrari baseball cap, with negotiators such as Davis veering from ill-mannered to unrealistic. It has squandered much of the negotiating period since article 50 was triggered, acting like its bumper sports the legend “MY OTHER COUNTRY IS A SUPERPOWER”. Incidentally, from the clown car to the car being driven knowingly over a cliff, it’s striking how many of the most apposite Brexit metaphors are car-related. Or, as the more literal leading Brexiteer economist Patrick Minford put it the other week: “You’re going to have to run [the car industry] down, in the same way we ran down the coal and steel industry. These things happen.” The post-imperial hangover wasn't. Britain was still drunk. And still is. The real hangover is going to be murderous.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Magnus Lewan Yet another great unknown. Even at this late date, It's still not clear if the UK can unilaterally cancel Art50. http://uk.businessinsider.com/theresa-may-fails-block-case-allow-uk-to-stop-brexit-50-article-2018-11 If they can't then it requires an agreement from all the rest of the EU. And it's not clear what conditions that would entail. The Euro, Schengen, no more rebate and so on, might well be required. — I wonder who told Theresa May to try block a court case that could have allowed the UK to call off Brexit? I mean, why would she do that, right?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitMeanwhile. "We can't stop Brexit" says Corbyn. http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/interview-with-labour-leader-corbyn-we-can-t-stop-brexit-a-1237594.html No comment. For the moment. — I wonder who told Theresa May to try block a court case that could have allowed the UK to call off Brexit? I mean, why would she do that, right?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Mixology 🍸And by the power of social media, here's the answer, Hm, I'll have to check, seems like the domain redirect isn't working. http://savoystomp.flannestad.com until I get a chance to fix it. — Erik Ellestad's blog SavoyStomp.com seems to have crashed and burned. Which makes me sad. Does anyone know him personally? I think he's based in SF. https://www.diffordsguide.com/people/3569/bartender/erik-ellestad
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThis drifted across my timeline. https://www.facebook.com/events/407604919778034/ The Great Brexit Bogroll Buyup. The UK imports all its toilet paper, & has only one day's supply. On Nov. 19 we will buy it all, as a taster of what Brexit will be like. — The great stockpiling has begun. Wild Water's Cardiff warehouse has capacity for 17,000 pallets. Across all its storage sites it is storing 40,000 pallets. [...] The company has now bought a 12-acre former wrapping paper factory in Aberbargoed and is converting it into another cold storage centre, which will cost £1.7m, with £500,000 over five years coming from the Welsh Government. It aims to employ 120 people within 18 months. Brexit creates jobs. In storage warehouses.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitBest comment: It took you this long to realise this? What have you been doing? — Jo Johnson has resigned as a transport minister, saying the country is "barrelling towards an incoherent Brexit" and calling for another referendum. The Orpington MP said that "given that the reality of Brexit has turned out to be so far from what was once promised, the democratic thing to do is to give the public the final say". Mr Johnson added his brother Boris, the chief Brexit campaigner and former foreign secretary, is "as unhappy with the government's proposals as I am". Can't complain about this Brexit TV series. Each time you think it gets a bit boring the writers throw in something from the left field.
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Commented on post by Chuck Bartok in Google+ Help+Charlotte Imbeau Everything on G+ for consumers will be deleted It seems likely, but we don't actually know that and we don't yet know the details. We don't know how long G+ will be available read only. We don't know how long the data will be accessible via Takeout. We don't know if Profiles and Circles will survive. What we have been told is that it will no longer be possible for G+ to be used by consumers after Aug 2019. One month has gone by now. But there's been no further official information from Google beyond the initial announcement. — Question regarding Recently, we made the decision to sunset the consumer version of Google+. What is the consumer version and what wil be left?
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Commented on post by marie srboui pochodian in Google+ HelpAs said, there's no way of doing this at the moment without writing code. However there is Google Takeout for exporting G+ posts and their comments. And there is both manual and API ways of importing data into Blogger. The problem is that the data export formats from takeout don't match the data import formats for Blogger. It shouldn't be too hard to write conversion utilities and even a one click content transfer program. But to my knowledge nobody has done that yet. Takeout -> HTML or JSON (in Takeout layout) JSON (in Blogger layout) or Atom (XML) -> Blogger — one question Is it possible export g+ to blogger ? If yes how to do it Thanks
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is Near2009 would have been when they were developing Google Buzz. Announced on 9-Feb-2010. I have to say I liked it and was sorry to see it go. But Google make some huge trust mistakes in the first year, auto-linking Gmail and Buzz. And then repeated the mistakes with G+,YT. You'd think they would have learnt. Where's Bradley Horowitz? — 2017 review of G+, discussion, Part 2 The comments to original are the gold here.
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Commented on post by Edward c in Google+ HelpThe only big platforms with substantial general purpose community/group function I'm aware of are G+, Facebook and Yahoogroups. Sub-Reddits are somewhat like this. There are numerous sites out there based on forum software like phpBB, vBulletin, Drupal. These tend to be focused on specific interests, like Ford Focus or Cycling. — Ok so let’s clear this up google accounts you don’t pay for but g suit accounts you have to pay a monthly fee for, This means on google+ if you have a community and you only have a normal google account time’s up but if you have a G suit account your alright although even if you have a G suit account community’s might still close
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in WordPressG+ posts are not necessarily short! It's not Twitter. It's more about keeping a public, searchable, archive of old posts. And an existing Wordpress blog seems as good a place as any to do that. Takeout.G+Streams.Posts does include comments and plus ones from other people. They could either be turned into wordpress comments (probably hard) or just included in the main post (probably easier). AFAIK, the Wordpress API does allow for posts and comments to be created from Atom files or an Atom feed. So it seems like some tool for turning G+ Takeout files into Atom files might be useful here. It might even be possible to create a tool to import Takeout directly into a Wordpress blog. — Has anyone got a good solution for moving a Google Takeout archive of G+ posts to a Wordpress blog?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Help+Strawberry Shortcake I assume that's aimed at me. Yes, I know about Takeout. And that's part of the reason for asking if publicly accessible Google Profiles, with the data entered in the Aboutme page, will survive. Since the takeout files make frequent reference to Google Profile URLs. — Dear +Google+: We're inviting you to comment to the 3,000+ members of G+MM community, all joined since 8 October 2018, on what if any plans, commitments, capabilities, migration support, etc., Google are planning. My view has been that if Google don't provide some clarification within the first month of the announced shutdown, there's likely to be little if any support. There are three days left in that first month. The Google+ profile has not posted in three weeks, and its recent posts are locked against comments.... https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/N5cNimR6jHj
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Help+John Elstone I'll take the wishes of good luck as encouragement rather than sarcasm. ;) You have to try, right? — Dear +Google+: We're inviting you to comment to the 3,000+ members of G+MM community, all joined since 8 October 2018, on what if any plans, commitments, capabilities, migration support, etc., Google are planning. My view has been that if Google don't provide some clarification within the first month of the announced shutdown, there's likely to be little if any support. There are three days left in that first month. The Google+ profile has not posted in three weeks, and its recent posts are locked against comments.... https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/N5cNimR6jHj
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ HelpAmong many other things, I'm particularly interested in whether publicly visible Google profiles will survive, along with all the information on the AboutMe page. — Dear +Google+: We're inviting you to comment to the 3,000+ members of G+MM community, all joined since 8 October 2018, on what if any plans, commitments, capabilities, migration support, etc., Google are planning. My view has been that if Google don't provide some clarification within the first month of the announced shutdown, there's likely to be little if any support. There are three days left in that first month. The Google+ profile has not posted in three weeks, and its recent posts are locked against comments.... https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/N5cNimR6jHj
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass Migration+Natacha Leriche I think I've done all the takeouts in both JSON and HTML. activitylog was broken to start with but seems better now. They all basically worked for me but they've all got detailed problems. — Dear +Google+: We're inviting you to comment to the G+MM community on what if any plans, commitments, capabilities, migration support, etc., Google are planning. My view has been that if Google don't provide some clarification within the first month of the announced shutdown, there's likely to be little if any support. There are three days left in that first month. The Google+ profile has not posted in three weeks, and its recent posts are locked against comments. I've reached out previously to Google directly through its press contact, with follow-up requests, specifically for Ben Smith, VP Engineering, or someone within his group to speak to G+MM. That request stands and is renewed here. As one of the moderators of this 3,000+ member community (all joined since 8 October 2018), we're very much hoping to hear from you, and soon. Normally our format is an Ask me Anything, but at the very least, and even if you don't have solid plans or schedules, we'd like to know what's in the cards, especially the following: Information on any features or capabilities of G+ to be disabled in advance of the final shut-down date. Presumably new-account formation will be among these, possibly new Community formation. The former is fairly understandable, the latter might be useful even at a late date in the migration for on-platform planning. Post-sunset availability of the G+ website itself. Will profiles and content still be Web-accessible? There's a substantial and long-lived set of content here, and a complete shutdown would be highly disruptive. Post-sunset access to users' Google+ data via Data Takeout. It's quite likely that not all users will have attempted, or succeeded, in creating and offloading their Google+ content. If it will still be able to create archives past the sunset date, this would be exceptionally useful information to have. Tools for migrating Google+ data to new platform(s). Numerous present G+ users would like to be able to migrate their personal posts, comments, photos, and other content to new platforms, likely to include other major social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, SmugMug/Flickr, etc.), blogs (Wordpress, Dreamwidth, Blogger, Medium, etc.), and the emerging universe of open and federated platforms. These archives will almost certainly contain non-public data which could be at best embarrassing, and potentially personally catastrophic or worse, if made public. Tools for safely and responsibly handling large data archives are lacking, and the present instructions and data structures within the Google+ elements of Google Data Takeout fail to adequately support this process. We are aware of third-party efforts to create migration tools, including from G+MM members, and Tim Berners-Lee of Solid who has begun work on a G+ Data Takeout migration tool. What specific steps, tools, instructions, and data format changes are Google planning to ensure that this process is effective, efficient, responsible, and respectful of privacy? Further, are Google now taking steps to work with both proprietary and Free Software projects to provide for import tools? Present G+ users will need to store their G+ data takeouts prior to migration elsewhere as well as for some time afterward to ensure full restoration. One of the available storage options is Google Drive, and at the very least, holding G+ data on Google Drive should not change the security risks appreciably over their initial Google-based storage. The size of some archives will push many users over the free service tier of Google Drive capacity. Will Google commit to providing indefinite free storage of Google+ Data Takeout archives on Google Drive without registering the data storage against other user limits? Use of Google Drive also presents an opportunity for Google to provide on-system access and management of G+ Data Takeout archives. Given this, will Google commit to providing native tools for viewing, searching, filtering, extracting, and exporting Google+ archives from within Google Drive, including at least post, comment, image, video, collection, and contact data, as well as for distinguishing public from non-public content, and providing for export to leading endpoints including Facebook, Diaspora, Friendica, Markdown, and a standard minimally complex HTML format, with batch-process (rather than individual item) capabilities? (There are likely other elements I'm omitting from this list and I invite G+MM members to suggest other needs, say, HOA, chat, events, or other G+ features which may be of interest in preserving.) G+ specialised in image presentation and was immensely popular amonst photographers. Classification of photographs, and in particular, sorting through photographic archives is a challenging task, particularly at volume. Google have considerable experience in image processing and recognition. Will Google commit to providing descriptive search capabilities to photo and image collections, as well as other descriptive characteristics such as date, size, format, and EXIF metadata, for searching, organising, selecting, and exporting image collections? Naturally, the sensitive information which may result from such analysis should be limited in access to the archive's owner only and not be provided or made available to any other parties. Google Communities were a major feature of Google+ and range in size to millions of members, with over 5 million communities created. There is presently no mechanism for exporting G+ communities as a whole in any format. This might be of value to either community owners in reconstituting the community elsewhere, or to members wishing to retain access to years worth of contributions. Will Google commit to providing tools for Community owners and members to export G+ Community posts and texts in a useful format? Thank you.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ HelpSeeAlso for a much longer version and request https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/N5cNimR6jHj — Dear +Google+: We're inviting you to comment to the 3,000+ members of G+MM community, all joined since 8 October 2018, on what if any plans, commitments, capabilities, migration support, etc., Google are planning. My view has been that if Google don't provide some clarification within the first month of the announced shutdown, there's likely to be little if any support. There are three days left in that first month. The Google+ profile has not posted in three weeks, and its recent posts are locked against comments.... https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/N5cNimR6jHj
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Commented on post by Lev Osherovich in PlusocalypseI expected to see more discussion about the G+Sunset at the Ingress community. https://plus.google.com/communities/103803967875500436831 — Because Ingress started out as an Android-only game and catered largely to early adopters in the Google ecosystem, Google+ was a fairly logical place to build a community. And while the rest of the world moved on from the network in fairly short order, the Ingress community thrived. When Google announced it was shuttering the service within the next ten months, Ingress was the fourth largest community on the platform with thousands active daily. Individual posts within the Ingress community continue to get hundreds of comments and interactions, all separate from the planning sub groups for players plotting their next attack on the opposing faction. This kind of active forum system is something Google+ has always done very well, especially when compared to the other large social networks. Losing it as a resource causes a lot of problems not only for the players who have been using it as a team message board for so long, but also for Niantic itself when trying to get the message out about new features and events outside of the app. The Ingress Twitter account, for example, has less than 100k followers and sees a little over 100 likes, retweets, and comments per post. The Ingress account on Google+ has over 4 million followers, and regularly sees six times the engagement per post. This includes calls to action for upcoming global events, which is a huge part of the Ingress gameplay experience. While it's unlikely shutting down Google+ is going to seriously impact attendance, it's certainly going to cause far fewer people to be aware of these events and the repercussions of one faction winning over the other in real-time.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationWhat are post-Sunset plans for Google Profiles? There are numerous places in the Takeout files that point to the current G+ Profile. Will those links all fail post the G+Sunset? Will there be a publicly visible version of a Google Account's "About Me" information? Takeout Enhancements There are lots of small enhancements needed to the Takeout files. Early adopters have been posting feedback about these. What plans are there for updates to the Takeout files? — Dear +Google+: We're inviting you to comment to the G+MM community on what if any plans, commitments, capabilities, migration support, etc., Google are planning. My view has been that if Google don't provide some clarification within the first month of the announced shutdown, there's likely to be little if any support. There are three days left in that first month. The Google+ profile has not posted in three weeks, and its recent posts are locked against comments. I've reached out previously to Google directly through its press contact, with follow-up requests, specifically for Ben Smith, VP Engineering, or someone within his group to speak to G+MM. That request stands and is renewed here. As one of the moderators of this 3,000+ member community (all joined since 8 October 2018), we're very much hoping to hear from you, and soon. Normally our format is an Ask me Anything, but at the very least, and even if you don't have solid plans or schedules, we'd like to know what's in the cards, especially the following: Information on any features or capabilities of G+ to be disabled in advance of the final shut-down date. Presumably new-account formation will be among these, possibly new Community formation. The former is fairly understandable, the latter might be useful even at a late date in the migration for on-platform planning. Post-sunset availability of the G+ website itself. Will profiles and content still be Web-accessible? There's a substantial and long-lived set of content here, and a complete shutdown would be highly disruptive. Post-sunset access to users' Google+ data via Data Takeout. It's quite likely that not all users will have attempted, or succeeded, in creating and offloading their Google+ content. If it will still be able to create archives past the sunset date, this would be exceptionally useful information to have. Tools for migrating Google+ data to new platform(s). Numerous present G+ users would like to be able to migrate their personal posts, comments, photos, and other content to new platforms, likely to include other major social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, SmugMug/Flickr, etc.), blogs (Wordpress, Dreamwidth, Blogger, Medium, etc.), and the emerging universe of open and federated platforms. These archives will almost certainly contain non-public data which could be at best embarrassing, and potentially personally catastrophic or worse, if made public. Tools for safely and responsibly handling large data archives are lacking, and the present instructions and data structures within the Google+ elements of Google Data Takeout fail to adequately support this process. We are aware of third-party efforts to create migration tools, including from G+MM members, and Tim Berners-Lee of Solid who has begun work on a G+ Data Takeout migration tool. What specific steps, tools, instructions, and data format changes are Google planning to ensure that this process is effective, efficient, responsible, and respectful of privacy? Further, are Google now taking steps to work with both proprietary and Free Software projects to provide for import tools? Present G+ users will need to store their G+ data takeouts prior to migration elsewhere as well as for some time afterward to ensure full restoration. One of the available storage options is Google Drive, and at the very least, holding G+ data on Google Drive should not change the security risks appreciably over their initial Google-based storage. The size of some archives will push many users over the free service tier of Google Drive capacity. Will Google commit to providing indefinite free storage of Google+ Data Takeout archives on Google Drive without registering the data storage against other user limits? Use of Google Drive also presents an opportunity for Google to provide on-system access and management of G+ Data Takeout archives. Given this, will Google commit to providing native tools for viewing, searching, filtering, extracting, and exporting Google+ archives from within Google Drive, including at least post, comment, image, video, collection, and contact data, as well as for distinguishing public from non-public content, and providing for export to leading endpoints including Facebook, Diaspora, Friendica, Markdown, and a standard minimally complex HTML format, with batch-process (rather than individual item) capabilities? (There are likely other elements I'm omitting from this list and I invite G+MM members to suggest other needs, say, HOA, chat, events, or other G+ features which may be of interest in preserving.) G+ specialised in image presentation and was immensely popular amonst photographers. Classification of photographs, and in particular, sorting through photographic archives is a challenging task, particularly at volume. Google have considerable experience in image processing and recognition. Will Google commit to providing descriptive search capabilities to photo and image collections, as well as other descriptive characteristics such as date, size, format, and EXIF metadata, for searching, organising, selecting, and exporting image collections? Naturally, the sensitive information which may result from such analysis should be limited in access to the archive's owner only and not be provided or made available to any other parties. Google Communities were a major feature of Google+ and range in size to millions of members, with over 5 million communities created. There is presently no mechanism for exporting G+ communities as a whole in any format. This might be of value to either community owners in reconstituting the community elsewhere, or to members wishing to retain access to years worth of contributions. Will Google commit to providing tools for Community owners and members to export G+ Community posts and texts in a useful format? Thank you.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitAs always. No paywall via google. https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Brexit+is+teaching+Britain+its+true+place+in+the+world&oq=Brexit+is+teaching+Britain+its+true+place+in+the+world — 'Brexit is teaching Britain its true place in the world' (Usually paywalled, but presently freely visible?) Too much of Britain’s politics, culture and its self-image have been driven by its colonial past and the national myths built up around the last war. It is why the Brexiters cling so desperately to the theory that Theresa May has betrayed Brexit. The alternative is to accept that it is their own reckless chauvinism that has reduced the UK to the role of supplicant with its former partners. Adjusting to a reduced status will require a reality check in our media and our politics and a touch of humility. If Brexit helps the UK come to a more accurate realisation of its global significance, some good may yet come out of this wretched business. Still, it seems an expensive way to learn a lesson. Full article text available here: https://www.reddit.com/r/ukpolitics/comments/9ugn2j/brexit_is_teaching_britain_its_true_place_in_the/
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Commented on post by Jesse Covner in G+ RPG Escape RocketOne Community/Group or many? IMHO, writing from scratch is way too hard. If the existing platforms don't work, then work with The Federation to build community/group function. Rather than just dismiss Facebook out of hand, what's good about Facebook Groups and what's bad? As far as I can see there is only G+ Communities, Facebook Groups and YahooGroups left in this space. If they don't work any more, they're still fully formed examples to work from. — The Present and a Road Map The End of an Online Community After discussing about the issue here and then trying various networks, I have come to this conclusion: members here can leave contact info and save the content they published here, but it is unlikely any community effort will create an effective replacement for G+ communities. I will outline a roadmap later in this post to explain a possible solution, but I doubt it will work. Ultimately, the best thing to do is to convince Google not to shut down G+, and ask them to convert to a model in which Community owners pay a yearly fee for keeping the group alive. Or somehow spin off G+ to the open source community. The one thing which holds G+’s diverse community together is the community itself, which will not exist if G+ is shut down. The people who discuss things here do not want to discuss things on Reddit (by and large) even though Reddit’s community is bigger and Reddit has better formatting and threading ability. People discussing things on G+ often are not into discussing on Discord, or at least, forum discussion and closed-but-large-group chat discussions fulfill very different roles. The people who just want to get info from a variety of sources can use aggregation tools. The bloggers still have their blogs and will continue to promote them to a variety of sources (maybe more often on Reddit, Twitter, and Facebook). People who like to follow others via social network (and who are actually into socialization through social connections) will lose out not because there are no better social networks, but because the G+ community is destroyed and a community cannot simply be replaced. Oh, and it seems that getting people to move to Facebook is less likely than getting the majority of Fate and PbtA gamers to play in an investigation-based campaign using D&D4.0 rules. Any single replacement option can appeal to some users but not all, nor even a majority. If if there was a replacement that did everything that everyone wants, it would take time for the community to build up to a sustainable level. But actually, all the alternatives are lacking: -MeWe is closed for outside-to-inside links so is of limited utility to “advertisers” (blog posters and product promoters). It has poor discovery mechanisms, and also has questionable business model which may offer an open door to undesirables. -The Federated options are mostly Twitter-replacements at this point. Although some are now offering long-form posting, there are no “Communities”; the only way to make one being to host a server… which is a quite daunting prospect that also puts the whole community (group / instance) at the whims of whoever if paying for it. -Reddit does not really offer good features for following specific types of content from specific users. It’s culture and content style is not well received with many G+ users. It’s corporate policies are looked on with suspicion. -Twitter is not a platform for long-form discussion. -BBS/Forum boards tend to lack community and don’t develop social connections (as they are not really social networks) -Facebook is considered evil. I’m more of a promoter on G+ than anything else, so I have less at stake. I’m building an RPG company and RPG products, so all I lose is the time invested in building this platform. I get my discussion on Reddit (where I mod r/RPGdesign), and I only need to come across new content on G+ once a week or so. But still, I think this situation is sad. Unless people can stop the ending of G+, the community will be destroyed. A Roadmap to Rebuild Here is a proposed plan. It’s not really likely to work but it is a plan. The goal of this plan is to build a network that is like G+ so that many current members would migrate to it. It is not a way to save the communities of G+, because, as mentioned above, those will die with G+. Step 1: Technical Feasibility and Cost Analysis: There are certain bare minimums that must be met to provide the functionality of G+. This includes ALL of the following: * Ability to create groups / communities without much effort; * Ability to block user and the ability of mods to ban users; * Ability to follow other users so that their content can appear intelligently a feed; * Display of total number of followers * User profile controls * Capability to write long posts with long-form replies * Ability to link to a post (and preferably also a reply) from the internet. * Display of respect for users rights, values, and privacy. Currently, there is no platform that does all of this. They all fail in critical areas (MeWe with external links, lack of good feed algorithms; Facebook with lack of respect; Reddit’s lack of user-follow detail, etc) The best way to achieve the above is to create a new network, owned by a non-profit group, and running a Federated platform. However, to achieve this, certain technical hurdles would need to be solved: * Communities / groups would need to be supported without needing to create a full new instance. (EDIT: although if the "instance owner" can set up lots of communities , ie OSR Community, Fate Community, etc" that could work too) * Long posts would need to be supported. If these features could be implemented, then at that point the user base needs to figure out how much all of this would cost and how long it would take. This step needs to start now. Step 2: Organize Non-Profit. We would need to organize a non-profit organization with a board of directors. Whithin the laws of this Non-Profit, we would need to have a Board of Directors vote / selection criteria. I know a lawyer who can create the non-profit and write up the laws. This step would need to be taken in January or so, after we have gotten more information about what Google will actually do. It may be useful for representatives of this organization to contact Google management; maybe there can be some collaboration. (Edit: I have no idea how to select the BoD, but the lawyer would be on it. I would nominate current owners of G+ RPG Escape Pod. At least 1-2 technical people. ) Step 3: Funding Once we have a clear leadership structure that is law-bound and transparent we present the plan to the community as a whole and ask for money. As this is a type of on-going project, a Patreon-type crowd sourcing project may be the best way to finance this. (Edit: honestly not worried about this if the cost is not too high. Lot's of people will pay $1 month for a G+ alternative. Supporters may get voting rights on BoD and a flair) Step 4: Management Once the funding is in place, the Board will select and assign managers and mods. Managers will oversea the technical development and monitor the mods. They will also take upon themselves the task of communicating the network to the RPG community. The Mods will moderate and enforce community standards on discussions. (Edit: Before the above happend, BoD will create a approve community behavior rules. There needs to be a general community buy-in mechanic. I'm not talking direct democracy here... but some mechanic to give the rules legitimacy) Step 5: Development The managers will assign people to develop the technical specification based on the original plan and the board of directors will monitor. (Edit: And the BoD will assign people to do promotion promotion promotion. I'll nominate myself for this because as an "advertiser" I benefit from the increasing size of the group)
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Commented on post by Jesse Covner in G+ RPG Escape RocketFollowing large numbers of blogs via a feed reader is OK, except that those blogs very rarely get any engagement or comments back. And if you do engage and comment back, its very hard for you to track all the conversations you're involved in. Blog comments don't have a good notification system, common log in, link to common profiles, or a good aggregation system. So Blogs effectively become Read-Only, One-To-Few, broadcast. There's merit in that, but it's not as good as G+Posts & Comments, Facebook Posts+comments for long form conversation. Disqus. — *What I need is...* The discussion threading / formatting options of Reddit (including ability to link from and to outside, long posts, nested replies, Markup) The social-networking functions of Google+ (following people preferably in one direction, seeing how many followers one has.) The filter -capabilities of Google+ (posts view-able only by followers or by group) No more advertisements nor user data sharing than what is currently done on Reddit. The subreddit / Community function of both. Is there anything that is EXACTLY like this? Cause I have not found it.
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Commented on post by Peter Maranci in Google+ Mass MigrationFacebook post. https://www.facebook.com/peter.maranci/posts/10156012826388526 It's the link on the datestamp. — I just did something a bit interesting: I wrote a long piece and posted it on G+, MeWe, Minds, DreamWidth, LiveJournal, Pluspora, Blogger, and Ello (it's about the Diablo 1 HD Mod). I wrote it in a Google Doc. Interestingly, G+ did NOT display the formatting; boldfacing and italics. Dreamwidth did, with no problems. So did LiveJournal, which received the post as an automatic crosspost from Dreamwidth. No formatting came through on MeWe, Minds, Pluspora, or Ello. Blogger displayed the formatting, but eliminated text wrapping; I had to switch to HTML and abandon the formatting (although I could have recreated it; it would just have taken a long time). I find it interesting that the two Google products, G+ and Blogger, couldn't handle the formatting applied by Google Docs! Now I'll wait and see which ones get the most responses, if any.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ UpdatesI get the impression Takeout is being improved and maintained. G+streams.activityLog was broken and failing for everyone for 2 weeks or so. It seems to be working now. So hopefully somebody is actually reading the feedback. — Some Questions for Google about the G+ Sunset. Any idea on how we get answers? - What happens to G+ Profiles? And the URL they exist on. - Will there be a publicly visible version of a Google Account "About Me" information? - Will G+ content stay up on the web read only? As a permanent fixture or for a period of transition time? - Will there be any tools provided by Google to do something useful with Takeout of G+ content and import into other systems? eg http://Blogger.com - Is there any chance of getting enhancements done to Takeout prior to the G+ sunset? I have a specific need to get post.activityID added to post.url in the G+stream JSON so I can use it as the Unique ID in the G+ API. I'm sure you have others.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ UpdatesI would hope that the Official G+, G+ account would also post something. https://plus.google.com/+googleplus — Some Questions for Google about the G+ Sunset. Any idea on how we get answers? - What happens to G+ Profiles? And the URL they exist on. - Will there be a publicly visible version of a Google Account "About Me" information? - Will G+ content stay up on the web read only? As a permanent fixture or for a period of transition time? - Will there be any tools provided by Google to do something useful with Takeout of G+ content and import into other systems? eg http://Blogger.com - Is there any chance of getting enhancements done to Takeout prior to the G+ sunset? I have a specific need to get post.activityID added to post.url in the G+stream JSON so I can use it as the Unique ID in the G+ API. I'm sure you have others.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI wonder what growth was like across all the federation. At least some G+ refugees joined Diaspora but not at pluspora. Mastodon seems to be going through another growth phase. https://dashboards.mnm.social/d/000000001/mastodon-network-overview?refresh=1h&orgId=1 https://the-federation.info/ — Pluspora Growth Trend Rising from 0 to >6,700 users, with the bulk of that occurring from 8 - 12 October. (Screenshot attached as URL doesn't provide a suitable preview.) https://the-federation.info/node/pluspora.com
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Commented on post by Peter Maranci in Google+ Mass MigrationCould you post the URLs to all the versions? I take it you just did cut and paste from G-Doc to the data entry form of each platform in a web browser? — I just did something a bit interesting: I wrote a long piece and posted it on G+, MeWe, Minds, DreamWidth, LiveJournal, Pluspora, Blogger, and Ello (it's about the Diablo 1 HD Mod). I wrote it in a Google Doc. Interestingly, G+ did NOT display the formatting; boldfacing and italics. Dreamwidth did, with no problems. So did LiveJournal, which received the post as an automatic crosspost from Dreamwidth. No formatting came through on MeWe, Minds, Pluspora, or Ello. Blogger displayed the formatting, but eliminated text wrapping; I had to switch to HTML and abandon the formatting (although I could have recreated it; it would just have taken a long time). I find it interesting that the two Google products, G+ and Blogger, couldn't handle the formatting applied by Google Docs! Now I'll wait and see which ones get the most responses, if any.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationGroups/Communities work really well. I'm not entirely sure why. I think at least part of it is that trying to get people to add their own metadata doesn't really work. And search is imperfect for finding specific topic discussions. But having a group be about a specific thing does focus people's minds. And dealing with off topic posts becomes a minor admin chore. At the core of this is making it easy to find good posts about a specific subject. Which points up the problem with collections. I didn't want all the electric car posts from one person, I wanted all the electric car posts from everybody, but only one's specifically about electric cars. And going to the biggest electric car group is much more likely to work for this, than looking for #electriccar or searching for "electric car". But Groups do have problems. Especially the one about duplicate groups being created each of which fails to get traction. And the mega-group that becomes useless due to sheer volume of posts, too many of which start going off topic. The platform needs to address this, raising the bar slightly to force people to take creating a group seriously. And offering ways of combining groups, pruning inactive or unstarted groups, dealing with absent landlords and so on. — Some thoughts on ways of categorising Social Networks along different dimensions. Network effects There is power in size. The question is, how much power? Metcalfe looked at it via the number of 1-1 connections possible and decided it was proportional to the square of the total number of nodes. This is one reason why Facebook or Twitter have more potential network power than G+. So the utility rise not just with N but N^2 Reed took this a stage further and looked at group forming and the total number of potential groups. The total number of possible groups is 2N - N - 1 suggesting that Utility rises in group forming networks at 2^N. However in real world networks nowhere near all possible groups actually form. In Social Groups it seems to me you need a minimum of 5 noisy people for the group to be self-sustaining. On the usual basis that 90% lurk, 9% Comment and 1% post, that means the real lower end is more like 50 people. At the upper end, Dunbar's number steps in as groups become too big for everyone to know each other. Somewhere around 150-250 people, groups tend to fragment. So as well as Social Networks gaining utility with N^2, if they support groups, their utility rises at somewhere between N^2 and 2^N. So for a Social Network to have long term utility we need lots of people able to form 1-1 relationships. And the ability to form small (5-250), long lived groups around common interests. The open question right now is whether we can build another truly large scale system (tens of millions of users, tens of thousands of groups) on top of a federated architecture or if this requires Google/Twitter/Facebook scale centralisation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metcalfe%27s_law https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed%27s_law One-Few-Many A long time ago now, I had the idea of categorising communication systems and platforms according to the numbers of creators and the number of consumers. Or authors and readers. Break each side into "One", "Few", "Many" and you have a 3*3 matrix of One-Few-Many authors communicating with One-Few-Many readers. So Private Blogs are typically One-to-Few. Big Media broadcast outlets are One-To-Many. Discussion forums are Few-To-Few. a person's experience of Feed aggregators is Few-To-One. Private messaging is generally One-to-One. eBay is Many-to-Many. Filling out all the cells in the matrix is an interesting intellectual exercise. The point though is that there are fundamental differences here between the various styles of comms. https://www.voidstar.com/node.php?id=2977 https://www.voidstar.com/images/onefewmany.gif Sync-Async Or Sync-real time, nearly real time, Async. How is the style of our comms defined by time? Chat and group chat (like IRC) happen almost in real time. People sometimes try and use Twitter or Email like this but it really doesn't work that way. We then bolt notification systems on top of this to try and speed up the responses and encourage people to respond immediately. But of course this breaks people's natural workflow. It also encourages a lack of thought in the reply. Often what's actually needed is a conscious decision to make the comms Async. Don't expect a reply in 24 hours and the reply you get is likely to be more thoughtful. Media Text, voice & image, video. There's a real problem with communications that use a tool that is too high up the stack here. This also relates back to the Sync-Async problem. Don't interrupt me with a voice message when I could skim read the text in my own time. But also don't use a screen shot just because of platform limitations (Twitter!). And don't do a 5 minute video to camera when 300 words would do that I could skim read in 20 seconds. But each media type as it's place. Your text review is no substitute for listening to the music or watching the film. But don't force me to watch the 45 minute TED talk to grok your 5 page idea. TL;DR. is bad, but TL;DV. is worse. Post Size Micro, Small, Long. There are fundamental differences in style between 140 chars, one screen of text and a 5 page essay. Every time we impose a limit the users will try and find ways round it. Hence Unroll, and reply-to-self /N conventions. Ideally, any one platform should support all these and not differentiate. In practice, dropping a 1000 word block into a chat doesn't work. But that's actually obvious. What isn't obvious but should be is that long form text is important. And somewhere in social networks there should be support for this. A long form post with semi-threaded short form comments below it is a highly successful pattern so should be supported.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationIt may be obvious from the above, but beware. Takeout of your own Posts (including into communities) is pretty complete and includes comments. Takeout of posts from a community is VERY incomplete and only consists of a post url. — Code that needs writing - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Blogger - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Atom - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Wordpress - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Reddit - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Other platforms that have an import or post API - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Static HTML as a better alternative to that provided by Google. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > Extract <body> section to files. - Takeout.G+Streams.Circles - > Enhanced VCard/CSV with additional data via G+API.people.get - Takeout - fix the filenames to deal with UTF-8 characters - Find My G+ Contacts on platform XXX. Like https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ Maybe Google will provide some of this. Like Atom output and one click migration to Blogger. More likely is that the community will cobble something together from the takeout files and Apis.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWorth reading this thread. There's no time left. https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1058338575530508288.html — There is no such thing as one poll that rules them all, but there are strong indications that voters in Labour seats are now in favour of a second referendum. Food for thought for Labour MPs. Corbyn is still in favour of calling an election first and going for a second referendum only if he can't get an election. His second-in-command, Keith Starmer, wants it the other way around.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearSadly, there are no good email clients. A huge problem with email is Outlook. Unfortunately, Gmail is not much better. In particular, I've yet to see a good threading model and display. Or a good filtering model. And part of the problem is that client design assumes one-to-one communication and then bolts on mailing lists and usenet. I'd actually like to see a client that works the other way. Solve the Usenet client problem, extend that to mailing lists. And then make it work for one-to-one. — A farewell to email ...Regardless of how these specific experiments work out, one conclusion is clear. Even the people who are most tied to email are finding it increasingly unworkable in the world we have grown into. Administering an email installation while blocking spam and ensuring that one's emails actually get delivered is getting harder; fewer people and organizations want to take it on. As a result, our formerly decentralized email system is becoming more centralized at a tiny number of email providers. If "email" means "Gmail", it starts to lose its advantage over other centralized sites.... +Jonathan Corbet at LWN noting a trend I've been observing, and practicing, myself. Email is becoming less usable, less used, more problematic, and yet without a clear alternative, open or otherwise. This is only part of the Plexodus problem, though many dynamics are similar and for related reasons. https://lwn.net/Articles/768483/
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitHow much damage has Momentum (Lansman) done by NOT calling for "No Brexit" in fear of political suicide in the Labour Heartlands? How bad does it have to get before they change their tune? Labour benefited from a huge influx of young remainers. And now they're losing them all. — There is no such thing as one poll that rules them all, but there are strong indications that voters in Labour seats are now in favour of a second referendum. Food for thought for Labour MPs. Corbyn is still in favour of calling an election first and going for a second referendum only if he can't get an election. His second-in-command, Keith Starmer, wants it the other way around.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationI need to go and update the examples of One-Few-Many for 2019. — Some thoughts on ways of categorising Social Networks along different dimensions. Network effects There is power in size. The question is, how much power? Metcalfe looked at it via the number of 1-1 connections possible and decided it was proportional to the square of the total number of nodes. This is one reason why Facebook or Twitter have more potential network power than G+. So the utility rise not just with N but N^2 Reed took this a stage further and looked at group forming and the total number of potential groups. The total number of possible groups is 2N - N - 1 suggesting that Utility rises in group forming networks at 2^N. However in real world networks nowhere near all possible groups actually form. In Social Groups it seems to me you need a minimum of 5 noisy people for the group to be self-sustaining. On the usual basis that 90% lurk, 9% Comment and 1% post, that means the real lower end is more like 50 people. At the upper end, Dunbar's number steps in as groups become too big for everyone to know each other. Somewhere around 150-250 people, groups tend to fragment. So as well as Social Networks gaining utility with N^2, if they support groups, their utility rises at somewhere between N^2 and 2^N. So for a Social Network to have long term utility we need lots of people able to form 1-1 relationships. And the ability to form small (5-250), long lived groups around common interests. The open question right now is whether we can build another truly large scale system (tens of millions of users, tens of thousands of groups) on top of a federated architecture or if this requires Google/Twitter/Facebook scale centralisation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metcalfe%27s_law https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed%27s_law One-Few-Many A long time ago now, I had the idea of categorising communication systems and platforms according to the numbers of creators and the number of consumers. Or authors and readers. Break each side into "One", "Few", "Many" and you have a 3*3 matrix of One-Few-Many authors communicating with One-Few-Many readers. So Private Blogs are typically One-to-Few. Big Media broadcast outlets are One-To-Many. Discussion forums are Few-To-Few. a person's experience of Feed aggregators is Few-To-One. Private messaging is generally One-to-One. eBay is Many-to-Many. Filling out all the cells in the matrix is an interesting intellectual exercise. The point though is that there are fundamental differences here between the various styles of comms. https://www.voidstar.com/node.php?id=2977 https://www.voidstar.com/images/onefewmany.gif Sync-Async Or Sync-real time, nearly real time, Async. How is the style of our comms defined by time? Chat and group chat (like IRC) happen almost in real time. People sometimes try and use Twitter or Email like this but it really doesn't work that way. We then bolt notification systems on top of this to try and speed up the responses and encourage people to respond immediately. But of course this breaks people's natural workflow. It also encourages a lack of thought in the reply. Often what's actually needed is a conscious decision to make the comms Async. Don't expect a reply in 24 hours and the reply you get is likely to be more thoughtful. Media Text, voice & image, video. There's a real problem with communications that use a tool that is too high up the stack here. This also relates back to the Sync-Async problem. Don't interrupt me with a voice message when I could skim read the text in my own time. But also don't use a screen shot just because of platform limitations (Twitter!). And don't do a 5 minute video to camera when 300 words would do that I could skim read in 20 seconds. But each media type as it's place. Your text review is no substitute for listening to the music or watching the film. But don't force me to watch the 45 minute TED talk to grok your 5 page idea. TL;DR. is bad, but TL;DV. is worse. Post Size Micro, Small, Long. There are fundamental differences in style between 140 chars, one screen of text and a 5 page essay. Every time we impose a limit the users will try and find ways round it. Hence Unroll, and reply-to-self /N conventions. Ideally, any one platform should support all these and not differentiate. In practice, dropping a 1000 word block into a chat doesn't work. But that's actually obvious. What isn't obvious but should be is that long form text is important. And somewhere in social networks there should be support for this. A long form post with semi-threaded short form comments below it is a highly successful pattern so should be supported.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationCommunities are a real problem at the moment. Only Community owners get anything. They get a list of people and a list of post URLs. That's not enough to get the posts and comments via the API because the API calls for activity.get requires activityId which is different from the URL shortcode with no way from going from one to the other. Good luck! — Code that needs writing - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Blogger - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Atom - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Wordpress - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Reddit - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Other platforms that have an import or post API - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Static HTML as a better alternative to that provided by Google. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > Extract <body> section to files. - Takeout.G+Streams.Circles - > Enhanced VCard/CSV with additional data via G+API.people.get - Takeout - fix the filenames to deal with UTF-8 characters - Find My G+ Contacts on platform XXX. Like https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ Maybe Google will provide some of this. Like Atom output and one click migration to Blogger. More likely is that the community will cobble something together from the takeout files and Apis.
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Commented on post by Brenda Rebel Angel in Google+ Help+Brenda Rebel Angel Oh well. It worked for me. All I can suggest is leave feedback. Is there a way of just moving them to Google Photos? Are we sure they're not already there? — I want to know one question and probably thousands of people too. Is Google going to give us a way to download our photos in collections, groups etc? Some of us were here from the beginning and would like to keep our thousands of posts. Personally, all my posts were original. I spent thousands of hours researching for my posts. To have everythng just deleted is very upsetting. Please can you answer this question.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Mixology 🍸Does anyone know any other mixology groups on other platforms that we could all decamp to? Because this bar is closing soon. — Google+ is closing down in August 2019. https://plus.google.com/+googleplus/posts/gxoJEZfRjPd https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ Download all your G+ data with Google Takeout. Save it in both JSON and HTML. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Google+ +1s, Circles, Communities, Streams. JSON for program access. The JSON version is more complete so save a copy even if you can't use it straight away. HTML as a quick and dirty way to put an archive on the web. Leave feedback about Takeout limitations. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback Takeout of Communities is very limited. ActivityLog appears to be broken. Talk to other people about all the issues. Google+ Mass Migration group. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 Especially about moving networks of people, contents and community to other platforms.
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Commented on post by Sisco Vanilla in Mixology 🍸BTW. http://Savoystomp.com is down. Which makes me sad. — Happy Halloween Everyone!!!! For today's SiscoVanilla's Special Daily Cocktail, I've decided to make a cocktail that is wickedly entitled Satan's Whiskers. I found the aptly named cocktail apropos for the day at hand. This cocktail hails back to the early 20th Century with its listing in Harry Craddock's Savoy Cocktail Book. Read on to learn more. Satan's Whiskers - .75oz Bombay Sapphire Gin - .75oz Dry Vermouth - .75oz Sweet Vermouth - .5oz Fresh Orange Juice - .5oz Grand Marnier 2 dashes of Fee Brothers Cardamon Bitters. Shake all ingredients with ice and strain into chilled glass. #SatansWhiskers #SavoyCocktailBook #OldManDrinks #BombaySapphireGin #DryVermouth #SweetVermouth #VermouthRosso #Orangejuice #CardamonBitters #Cocktail #Cocktails #Coctel #Cocteles #Cocteleria #SiscoVanilla #SiscoVanillaisStepping #SiscoVanillaHitsTheBricks #SiscoVanillasSpecialDailyCocktail #FinnsCorner
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Commented on post by Sisco Vanilla in Mixology 🍸Hmmm. The Savoy book says equal quantities of everything including the OJ. The only exception being the orange liqueur. And with Orange bitters. Unusual, but I like it. I did 25ml*4+12ml+dash. — Happy Halloween Everyone!!!! For today's SiscoVanilla's Special Daily Cocktail, I've decided to make a cocktail that is wickedly entitled Satan's Whiskers. I found the aptly named cocktail apropos for the day at hand. This cocktail hails back to the early 20th Century with its listing in Harry Craddock's Savoy Cocktail Book. Read on to learn more. Satan's Whiskers - .75oz Bombay Sapphire Gin - .75oz Dry Vermouth - .75oz Sweet Vermouth - .5oz Fresh Orange Juice - .5oz Grand Marnier 2 dashes of Fee Brothers Cardamon Bitters. Shake all ingredients with ice and strain into chilled glass. #SatansWhiskers #SavoyCocktailBook #OldManDrinks #BombaySapphireGin #DryVermouth #SweetVermouth #VermouthRosso #Orangejuice #CardamonBitters #Cocktail #Cocktails #Coctel #Cocteles #Cocteleria #SiscoVanilla #SiscoVanillaisStepping #SiscoVanillaHitsTheBricks #SiscoVanillasSpecialDailyCocktail #FinnsCorner
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Commented on post by Brenda Rebel Angel in Google+ HelpYou can find G+ Photos in Takeout hidden under G+ Streams, Select specific data. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout — I want to know one question and probably thousands of people too. Is Google going to give us a way to download our photos in collections, groups etc? Some of us were here from the beginning and would like to keep our thousands of posts. Personally, all my posts were original. I spent thousands of hours researching for my posts. To have everythng just deleted is very upsetting. Please can you answer this question.
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearFunny to see VRM, Doc Searls, Cluetrain, Gillmor gang, IIW turn up again. I wonder what happened to https://identitywoman.net/ She was one of the high profile refugees from the Real Names debacle. Not really relevant here, but the bit of VRM I got interested in was advertising management from the user end. I wanted, "love, ignore, block" buttons on every ad so I could talk back. And an RSS feed of ads very specifically aimed at me where I could say "not that, not that, more of this please". — From Platform to Protocol I'm having some conversations with the Vendor Relationship Management folks about the mass migration of Google+ users. If you're not familiar with VRM, I highly recommend you take a look. One of the interesting comments, I thought I'd share: If a parallel of what happened to AOL mail to SMTP/IMAP mail transition can occur again, it could be done. That has to happen at the protocol level. I am yet to see such.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWhen I told an Irish person how funny he was because Irish people are always doing stupid things he accused me of telling offensive jokes. My fav Irish joke. An Irish labourer goes to a building site looking for work. The foreman says, "We need experienced builders. I just have a simple test before we can take you on". "No problem", says the Irishman. "Ok. What's the difference between a girder and a joist?". "Ah to be sure, you've started with the easy ones", answers the Irishman, "Goethe wrote Faust and Joyce wrote Ulysses". — My Great Aunt Meredith was killed in WW2 when a heavy box of pencils fell on her head during a routine inspection of a stock room in Melbourne’s famous pencil district. This was at the height of the Blitz – and although that was going on many miles away in London my family always believed that the Germans were ultimately responsible because the pencils had been shipped via Hamburg. Growing up with the knowledge that Meredith had been a victim of the German war machine made me long for British freedom. Poppies are a personal thing and we shouldn’t judge people – but I wear my poppy with pride because of Great Aunt Meredith – unlike left wing fascists who literally hate Britain and everyone in it. This is very, very Brexit. And very well written.
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Commented on post by Michael Kennedy in G+ RPG Escape RocketIt's 2018 going on 2019. Not 2005. What are the chances of somebody building a Facebook/G+ scale social network to challenge the majors in the next couple of years? Could another Twitter emerge now? I keep waiting for the Chinese to expand into the rest of the world. And produce westernised, English language sections of their platforms. Western industry talk tends to be about Google, Apple, Facebook etc doing deals with China. We rarely hear about Wechat, Weibo, QQ, Alibaba opening an office in New York or London. — Ok I don't know if this is a thing that is even possible but I had the idea and wanted to throw it out here. Someone with the technical expertise sets out to make another G+, basically copying the platform completely, adding only those changes which are universally agreed upon to be good. This is gonna be difficult expensive and time-consuming, I'm sure, so we can crowdsource the funding for it via Patreon or something like it. This solves a lot of issues: for one, we get to keep all the cool stuff about G+ but it we be something we have built and therefore we populate. There will be little risk of malicious outsiders coming in because few will know about it but those in the OSR/DIY scene. What do you think? Could we do it?
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Commented on post by Michael Kennedy in G+ RPG Escape Rocket+Jesse Covner Yes. Google+ is closing down in August 2019. https://plus.google.com/+googleplus/posts/gxoJEZfRjPd https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ Download all your G+ data with Google Takeout. Save it in both JSON and HTML. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Google+ +1s, Circles, Communities, Streams. JSON for program access. The JSON version is more complete so save a copy even if you can't use it straight away. HTML as a quick and dirty way to put an archive on the web. Leave feedback about Takeout limitations. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback Takeout of Communities is very limited. ActivityLog appears to be broken. Talk to other people about all the issues. Google+ Mass Migration group. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 Especially about moving networks of people, contents and community to other platforms. — Ok I don't know if this is a thing that is even possible but I had the idea and wanted to throw it out here. Someone with the technical expertise sets out to make another G+, basically copying the platform completely, adding only those changes which are universally agreed upon to be good. This is gonna be difficult expensive and time-consuming, I'm sure, so we can crowdsource the funding for it via Patreon or something like it. This solves a lot of issues: for one, we get to keep all the cool stuff about G+ but it we be something we have built and therefore we populate. There will be little risk of malicious outsiders coming in because few will know about it but those in the OSR/DIY scene. What do you think? Could we do it?
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Commented on post by al m in Google+ Mass MigrationMaybe we could all move to eBay comments. Or perhaps Amazon review pages for fictitious algorithmically generated products with artificially inflated prices used for money laundering. They're both "Social". — Not sure if this has been shared here yet, but I read each of the 250 descriptions and found it somewhat useful to see what's out there. Though I doubt it's a fully vetted list, it has the link to each platform and is a helpful reference. I also offer a Google Plus Meetup Group on Facebook for any interested. Google Plus Meetup Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/1189060457917856/?ref=bookmarks https://socialmedialist.org/social-media-apps.html?fbclid=IwAR22uE99Q1b7NC1zG99pPFhKW7KUYQ9_pnIo4VsGM77IJw47Otdmb8qvK4I
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Commented on post by Al Tlön in Google+ Mass Migration+Halfey Halphstein Yup. The-Inq is just a low rent version of ElReg. You can safely ignore it. ps. Trying to remember ElReg's nickname for Google. "The Chocolate Factory"? Or is that Apple? — Sheeesh "A petition on popular echo chamber Change.org is beseeching Google to keep on the official floggers-of-the-dead-horse that is Google+, for the benefit of the few agoraphobic dwellers of the baronies and fiefdoms within."
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThey can just take the train. I hear they're fast, cheap, clean and run on time in the "abroad". — The Foreign Office is drawing up plans to rescue Britons if they are stranded in Europe because of disruption to flights after Brexit. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt told MPs rescue flights were one of a number of emergency procedures being prepared in the event of a "no deal" divorce. Does anyone have an idea how this is supposed to work? In case of no deal, the few remaining British airplanes on European soil can make their way home, but then thats it. Is Hunt hoping to charter European airplanes whose pilots are willing to fly into unregulated airspace? Oh, I get it. Magical airplanes. With unicorns. This is just Brexit business as usual.
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Commented on post by Michael Kennedy in G+ RPG Escape RocketThe first problem is writing the code. Or using pre-written code. The next problem is kick-starting a network until it's self sustaining. The next problem is finding a way to pay for it all. But. If you want something self contained for a specific and relatively small community of interest, firing up an instance of forum software like phpBB or Drupal is not that hard or expensive. And if you want to be part of something bigger, then run an instance of one of the federated systems. But writing your own system is absolutely NOT trivial. And neither is getting engagement and activity. — Ok I don't know if this is a thing that is even possible but I had the idea and wanted to throw it out here. Someone with the technical expertise sets out to make another G+, basically copying the platform completely, adding only those changes which are universally agreed upon to be good. This is gonna be difficult expensive and time-consuming, I'm sure, so we can crowdsource the funding for it via Patreon or something like it. This solves a lot of issues: for one, we get to keep all the cool stuff about G+ but it we be something we have built and therefore we populate. There will be little risk of malicious outsiders coming in because few will know about it but those in the OSR/DIY scene. What do you think? Could we do it?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is Near"Social Inbox" just reminded me of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FriendFeed Another service that needs re-creating. — "It's a bit sad that I have to go to ten+ places in the future in order to find my favourite communities." Comment from a G+ community discussion on alternatives. It rather highlights the root of the problem: that we have to go to the conversations rather than have them come to us. A social / user-generated media inbox and user/authentication management piece would address that. Something that does not presently exist.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearI think it may be the conversation that is hard to aggregate. We hit this early with blogs. You could aggregate all the blogs you had found in your feed reader. But if you had a habit of posting comments on individual posts, it was almost impossible to follow up on and catch up with the conversations that spawned. This is one of the reasons why Disqus appeared. There was the option of going to Disqus to catch up on the threads you were in spread round the blogs. Except that I almost never do! — "It's a bit sad that I have to go to ten+ places in the future in order to find my favourite communities." Comment from a G+ community discussion on alternatives. It rather highlights the root of the problem: that we have to go to the conversations rather than have them come to us. A social / user-generated media inbox and user/authentication management piece would address that. Something that does not presently exist.
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Commented on post by Jesse Covner in G+ RPG Escape Rocket<cough> facebook </cough> — *What I need is...* The discussion threading / formatting options of Reddit (including ability to link from and to outside, long posts, nested replies, Markup) The social-networking functions of Google+ (following people preferably in one direction, seeing how many followers one has.) The filter -capabilities of Google+ (posts view-able only by followers or by group) No more advertisements nor user data sharing than what is currently done on Reddit. The subreddit / Community function of both. Is there anything that is EXACTLY like this? Cause I have not found it.
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Commented on post by Sasha Hart in G+ RPG Escape RocketYes, you can takeout HTML and later JSON. And I'd strongly advise doing both. If you only do one and don't plan on doing anything with it immediately, then JSON as it's likely other people will write code to do something useful with it. The HTML files for each post are actually ok and reasonably simple. It's only the index.html that is Google's usual huge pile of javascript. And it's comparatively trivial to build a much simpler index page. — If you have G+ takeout data in JSON format, what will you do with it? For example, if you want to be able to browse that data or publish it, it's fairly easy to write little scripts to convert from JSON to something else, and to make those files available on a website for pennies per month. Let's discuss the options.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationThe generic problem here is the large number of references in the takeout files to assets and URLs within the G+ system. If G+ goes away completely and those assets and URLs disappear, the takeout files will have major holes in them. Even something as comparatively minor as profile avatars. — Code that needs writing - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Blogger - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Atom - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Wordpress - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Reddit - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Other platforms that have an import or post API - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Static HTML as a better alternative to that provided by Google. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > Extract <body> section to files. - Takeout.G+Streams.Circles - > Enhanced VCard/CSV with additional data via G+API.people.get - Takeout - fix the filenames to deal with UTF-8 characters - Find My G+ Contacts on platform XXX. Like https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ Maybe Google will provide some of this. Like Atom output and one click migration to Blogger. More likely is that the community will cobble something together from the takeout files and Apis.
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Commented on post by Bernhard Suter in Google+ Mass MigrationTool originally created by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Swartz RIP :( — Nice library which can be used for converting html formatted content strings in JSON takeout archive to markdown: #!/usr/bin/python import json import sys import html2text converter = html2text.HTML2Text() converter.ignore_links = True for filename in sys.argv[1:]: post = json.load(open(filename)) print ('%s :' % (filename, )) if 'content' in post: print(converter.handle(post['content']))
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWatching this on the news last night, Yvette Cooper is really good at that whole "rolls eyes" thing. — The shitshow continues. The government wants the estimated 3.5 million EU citizens in the UK to apply for settled status so they can continue living and working here. But that will not have happened by the time Britain leaves the EU on 29 March. In fact, Ms Nokes [government mininster] revealed to the Commons Home Affairs committee, just 650 people had registered so far in a pilot programme. Just wait, it gets better. She also revealed the system for EU citizens to register for settled status still didn't work on Apple phones. She said the US tech giant "won't release the upgrade we need in order for it to function". Clearly Apple's fault that Brexit doesn't work. But Ms Nokes suggested that in the event of a no-deal Brexit, where there would not be a transition period, new immigration controls - including employer checks of immigration status - will apply to EU citizens next year. "If somebody hasn't been here prior to the end of March next year, employers will have to make sure they go through adequately rigorous checks to evidence somebody's right to work." And now, suddenly, employers are supposed to check immigration status. In her evidence to the committee, Ms Nokes confirmed that EU nationals would not be issued with paperwork proving their immigration status. Wait, what? Pictured: committee chairwoman Yvette Cooper, looking as confused as everyone else.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit#WeLoveTheNHS . Don't let them destroy it. — The endgame. Ministers should allow American healthcare companies to compete with the NHS to run hospitals as part of a free-trade pact after Brexit, a think tank recommends. The Initiative for Free Trade (IFT) said that Britain should also end its ban on imports of products such as chlorinated chicken and accept American environmental and food Sounds safety regulations as equivalent to those in the UK. Sounds great. What was that about £350 million per week sent to the EU?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+John Lewis Yes. And there's actually a takeout service for the photos you stored in G+ Photos. — Code that needs writing - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Blogger - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Atom - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Wordpress - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Reddit - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Other platforms that have an import or post API - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Static HTML as a better alternative to that provided by Google. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > Extract <body> section to files. - Takeout.G+Streams.Circles - > Enhanced VCard/CSV with additional data via G+API.people.get - Takeout - fix the filenames to deal with UTF-8 characters - Find My G+ Contacts on platform XXX. Like https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ Maybe Google will provide some of this. Like Atom output and one click migration to Blogger. More likely is that the community will cobble something together from the takeout files and Apis.
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Commented on post by Yahuchanan Yakazqa'al Yashra'al in Google+ Updates+Julie Wills IMHO. It's my community. I set it up. I put the effort in to moderate it. So it seems completely reasonable to me to be able to archive the contents. Then there's the use case where the community as a whole wants to migrate somewhere else (like Reddit) and take their content with them. Then there's the situation right now where your posts in Takeout come with the full content of all the comments from other people. I get their content even though they didn't explicitly agree to me having it. If you grab your comments via Takeout.G+Stream.activitylog they come with the full text of the parent post. So by commenting on a post I can download the original post. All of this blurs the lines so I don't think it's cut and dried at all, at all. And I'm still left with the big use case. Which is wanting to migrate the whole community of people and content to another platform so they can continue the conversation without losing the history. — What happens to my Google communitys after y'all shut down smh
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Commented on post by Yahuchanan Yakazqa'al Yashra'al in Google+ Updates+Yahuchanan Yakazqa'al Yashra'al I'm pretty sure that the answer is you can't do that. Right now. It may become possible during the next few months and before G+ Sunset. But it's not possible now. — What happens to my Google communitys after y'all shut down smh
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Bernhard Suter There's a lot of references in the json and html to media assets on http://xxx.googleusercontent.com This is the same location that Google Photos uses. So I think it's highly likely that content from your profile that counts towards your storage allocation and is stored in that domain will stick around. — Code that needs writing - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Blogger - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Atom - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Wordpress - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Reddit - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Other platforms that have an import or post API - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Static HTML as a better alternative to that provided by Google. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > Extract <body> section to files. - Takeout.G+Streams.Circles - > Enhanced VCard/CSV with additional data via G+API.people.get - Takeout - fix the filenames to deal with UTF-8 characters - Find My G+ Contacts on platform XXX. Like https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ Maybe Google will provide some of this. Like Atom output and one click migration to Blogger. More likely is that the community will cobble something together from the takeout files and Apis.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Updates+Julie Wills Even if we don't expect an answer quickly, it's still worth asking them. And collecting them. And asking again. — What will happen to the official Google support communities on G+ ? eg https://plus.google.com/+Blogger There's a lot more of them here. https://www.google.com/press/blog-social-directory.html
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Commented on post by Peter Suber+Filip H.F. Slagter For a brief while (when G+ was new) there was a convention to put a redirect into one's personal website that went to your G+ Profile. In the form $mydomain/+ Apparently mine still works! — A short open letter to Google on minimizing the damage of shutting down Google Plus I'm one of many users not happy with your decision to shut down G+. https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ I don't expect you to reverse course on that decision. So I won't ask. Instead, I have two requests on how to minimize the damage to users like me, who have created a significant body of G+ posts over the years and shared the URLs widely. 1. Don't delete our posts. Stop us from adding new ones if you must, but don't delete the old ones. I know we can export and save them, and I plan to do that. https://9to5google.com/2018/10/08/how-to-download-google-plus-data/ But the exported copies will be offline, with no obvious way to put them back online in a form comparable to the original form. It's hard to believe that Google is the company that heroically hunted down, preserved, and reposted all the original Usenet posts. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usenet Google wasn't even the creator or proponent-in-chief of Usenet. It's hard to believe that for posts to your own platform, you'd prefer deletion to preservation. It doesn't have to be that way. At least do for G+ posts what you did for Usenet posts. Save them all, keep them online, and keep them readable, discoverable, and useful. 2. There are many ways to implement the first suggestion. If you consider taking the step at all, please consider a solution that doesn't break the URLs to the original G+ posts. Either keep the posts at the existing URLs, or create seamless redirects to the new online space where you archive G+. As a variation on this theme, let us put all our G+ posts in our individual Google One accounts. Do it in a way that does not count against our memory quota. In that sense, treat these posts the way you treat Google Photos. Do it in a way that makes our public G+ posts automatically public, like public Google docs. Do it in a way that creates redirects from the original G+ platform. Make the migration a simple pushbutton operation. +Google+ +Google #googleplus #google+ #google
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Sebastian Lasse I'm quite in favour of the idea of a feed format and schema to rival RSS and Atom but in JSON. But people have been trying to do this for quite a while now and nothing's really got traction. RSS and especially Atom have a huge advantage that there's loads of it out there and loads of tools and libraries for using it. So I'd suggest that G+ migration is not the time for building new formats. — Code that needs writing - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Blogger - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Atom - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Wordpress - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Reddit - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Other platforms that have an import or post API - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts - > Static HTML as a better alternative to that provided by Google. - Takeout.G+Streams.Posts.html - > Extract <body> section to files. - Takeout.G+Streams.Circles - > Enhanced VCard/CSV with additional data via G+API.people.get - Takeout - fix the filenames to deal with UTF-8 characters - Find My G+ Contacts on platform XXX. Like https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ Maybe Google will provide some of this. Like Atom output and one click migration to Blogger. More likely is that the community will cobble something together from the takeout files and Apis.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Climate Change+Jorg Lovoll 1) It's closed in the sense that posts on mewe are not visible externally or indexed/searchable externally. 2) It's getting a reputation for being far-right. And the owner has political views that some find distasteful. "open minded" is a bit of a dog whistle. — Google+ is closing down in August 2019. https://plus.google.com/+googleplus/posts/gxoJEZfRjPd https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ Download all your G+ data with Google Takeout. Save it in both JSON and HTML. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Google+ +1s, Circles, Communities, Streams. JSON for program access. The JSON version is more complete so save a copy even if you can't use it straight away. HTML as a quick and dirty way to put an archive on the web. Leave feedback about Takeout limitations. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback Takeout of Communities is very limited. ActivityLog appears to be broken. Talk to other people about all the issues. Google+ Mass Migration group. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 Especially about moving networks of people, contents and community to other platforms.
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Commented on post by Peter SuberI would like to see Google put some effort into providing tools for moving G+ data elsewhere. - One click conversion to posts on a pre-existing http://Blogger.com blog. - Atom as a format for posts to go with JSON and HTML in a format that works with http://wordpress.com. I don't expect a one click "migrate to wordpress" solution but I would expect the atom files to work with the wordpress import functions. - Support for community owners to archive their whole community. At the moment all they get is a list of URLs to posts. - Confirmation that VCards of Circles are copied into Gmail Contacts. - Downloads of Followers to go with downloads of circles. It's available in the UI, why isn't it in Takeout? - Guarantees that Google Profiles won't be lost and that there will be a UI to display public information within them. So that data in aboutme is actually visible (optionally) to other people with a redirect from the G+ Profile URL. — A short open letter to Google on minimizing the damage of shutting down Google Plus I'm one of many users not happy with your decision to shut down G+. https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ I don't expect you to reverse course on that decision. So I won't ask. Instead, I have two requests on how to minimize the damage to users like me, who have created a significant body of G+ posts over the years and shared the URLs widely. 1. Don't delete our posts. Stop us from adding new ones if you must, but don't delete the old ones. I know we can export and save them, and I plan to do that. https://9to5google.com/2018/10/08/how-to-download-google-plus-data/ But the exported copies will be offline, with no obvious way to put them back online in a form comparable to the original form. It's hard to believe that Google is the company that heroically hunted down, preserved, and reposted all the original Usenet posts. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usenet Google wasn't even the creator or proponent-in-chief of Usenet. It's hard to believe that for posts to your own platform, you'd prefer deletion to preservation. It doesn't have to be that way. At least do for G+ posts what you did for Usenet posts. Save them all, keep them online, and keep them readable, discoverable, and useful. 2. There are many ways to implement the first suggestion. If you consider taking the step at all, please consider a solution that doesn't break the URLs to the original G+ posts. Either keep the posts at the existing URLs, or create seamless redirects to the new online space where you archive G+. As a variation on this theme, let us put all our G+ posts in our individual Google One accounts. Do it in a way that does not count against our memory quota. In that sense, treat these posts the way you treat Google Photos. Do it in a way that makes our public G+ posts automatically public, like public Google docs. Do it in a way that creates redirects from the original G+ platform. Make the migration a simple pushbutton operation. +Google+ +Google #googleplus #google+ #google
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationSomebody I used to work for said "The winner is the one with all the names". He could easily be described as a "Networker" in that he has a huge rolodex of business people around the world and finds ways of making money from introducing them to each other. And getting non-exec positions with their businesses. For him, Linkedin is an obvious primary resource, but the rise of Social Networks meant he could meet and interact with new people on the basis of his posts and comments. — Question: Is "social networking" a worthwhile goal? Why, or why not? Some sub-questions: What is it? What does it offer? For good or bad? What doesn't it offer? Are the bad parts fixable? What practical alternatives are possible? Are there elements particularly resistant to repair, which generate frictions, or hard to replace?
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Commented on post by CA M in Google+ Mass MigrationWhen Google Buzz shut down, ISTR Takeout was still available for 6 months to a year after the UI closed. I'd expect the same thing to happen with G+ — Hmm wondering if google is going to delete out all of the google+ data files that has been hosted on their servers or just simply disable the interactive connectivity leaving the files Sun setting can mean no longer useful active disabled but doesn’t have to necessarily mean completely dismantled
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Climate Change+Jorg Lovoll Is it, though? — Google+ is closing down in August 2019. https://plus.google.com/+googleplus/posts/gxoJEZfRjPd https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ Download all your G+ data with Google Takeout. Save it in both JSON and HTML. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Google+ +1s, Circles, Communities, Streams. JSON for program access. The JSON version is more complete so save a copy even if you can't use it straight away. HTML as a quick and dirty way to put an archive on the web. Leave feedback about Takeout limitations. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback Takeout of Communities is very limited. ActivityLog appears to be broken. Talk to other people about all the issues. Google+ Mass Migration group. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 Especially about moving networks of people, contents and community to other platforms.
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Commented on post by Yahuchanan Yakazqa'al Yashra'al in Google+ UpdatesThere are problems with Takeout G+ Communities. You only get output for communities you own. And you only get a list of post URLs, not the content of the posts. And of course the URLs will 404 after G+ Sunset. And there's no way of going from the URL to the activityID which the API needs to get a post. So if you wanted to archive your community's content or move it somewhere else, you'll have to scrape each post off the web interface. Which is not an option and sucks. Feedback sent. Please send more. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback — What happens to my Google communitys after y'all shut down smh
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Commented on post by Kristian Köhntopp in Fluffy fluff.In UKIP colours. — https://twitter.com/HumansOfLate/status/1056649940305354754 Happy Halloween!
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege25 Euros! WTF is this doing in Europe? Shouldn't it have a UKIP rosette? ps. Although. It's in UKIP colours! So actually it can be re-used later for the UKIP party conference. — Humans of Late Stage Capitalism.
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Commented on post by Bernhard Suter in Google+ Mass MigrationThe takeout data structures seem different, but related to the API structures. https://developers.google.com/+/web/api/rest/latest/activities#resource-representations Have you matched them off? Is there data available in the API that doesn't appear in the Takeout? — Continuing the takeout data migration process with a first look at the data that is in the archive.
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Commented on post by Bernhard Suter in Google+ Mass MigrationAn example of Collections JSON info for a post in a single collection. "postAcl": { "collectionAcl": { "collection": { "resourceName": "collections/AB2YX", "displayName": "Politics" } } } Here's the HTML https://voidstar.com/Takeout/Google+/Posts/20160216%20-%20I%20wonder%20how%20much%20easier%20travelling%20by_.html <div class="visibility">Shared to the collection <a href="https://plus.google.com/collection/AB2YX">Politics</a> - Private</div> — Continuing the takeout data migration process with a first look at the data that is in the archive.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Chromecast+Andrew Hatchett Doh! Apparently I can't even read ... But then there is https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!forum/chromecast which seems to be still running while also pointing you somewhere else. — Google+ is closing down in August 2019. https://plus.google.com/+googleplus/posts/gxoJEZfRjPd https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ Download all your G+ data with Google Takeout. Save it in both JSON and HTML. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Google+ +1s, Circles, Communities, Streams. JSON for program access. The JSON version is more complete so save a copy even if you can't use it straight away. HTML as a quick and dirty way to put an archive on the web. Leave feedback about Takeout limitations. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback Takeout of Communities is very limited. ActivityLog appears to be broken. Talk to other people about all the issues. Google+ Mass Migration group. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 Especially about moving networks of people, contents and community to other platforms. So where are Google Product Support communities going to go?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Media / Tech / SurveillanceYes, yes, yes and yes. Except for this bit. We need to create a blockchain-enabled social media. I firmly believe that's the wrong solution. I also think it's a category error. And then, a public social network with full cryptographic anti-deniability and anti-falsifiability could still be hijacked by bad actors. And especially if there's not enough moderation. — Manal al-Sharif: We need a new decentralised online media, "Twitter is now becoming a trap": Why I deleted my Twitter account Online harassment, propaganda, misinformation silencing tool of governments, dictatorships, and tyrants. Decentralised, non-advertising-based media are required. Also: Social media ‘aids oppressors’, says Saudi rights campaigner Manal al-Sharif, a leader in the fight for Saudi women’s right to drive, claims Twitter is used to harass activists https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/oct/28/twitter-facebook-saudi-oppression Transcript: Good morning everyone. I am in Stockholm, Sweden, and yesterday in Singularity U, I decided to delete my Twitter account live on stage in a protest of how this tool that once saved my life is now being used to put my life and the life of a lot of human rights and activists in danger. If you look at world wide trends today it is ... I am Arab, and Mohammed bin Salman represents me. This tells you who is in control now of Twitter: Twitter is being controlled by trolls, by pro-government mobs, and by bots. Those are being paid by pro-government [agent]s who want to silence, intimidate, harass, dissidents and anyone who speaks the truth. Twitter today is being used by the same governments that we spoke against to disclose all the violations against human rights. It's being used by them to silence us, and not only to silence us but to propagate their propaganda, to also push for disinformation, and to harass and silence every single true voice. People I know, people I trusted -- people I'd thought were friends, and who have critical thinking -- they've been brainwashed by the messages being pushed by the pro-Saudi government (voices), in a way that is horrendous. I ... I wonder is this really happening? Is this really true? Ali Alzabarah), the Saudi Twitter employee, who had close ties with Saudi Intelligence, had had access to private accounts of Saudi activists providing this information to the Saudi government. Day by day, more and more, we know about "influentials" -- Twitter influentials -- who were harrassed, sent to prison, and even disappeared. Reports by companies like McKinsey -- _The New York Times talked about that [hhttps://http://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/20/us/politics/saudi-image-campaign-twitter.html] -- really make me worried. Twitter is now becoming a trap, and it's being used in a very efficient way by these governments, and dictatorships and tyrants to silence us, and not only that, but to spread their own propaganda, their own hate speech, their own misinformation and disinformation. This is why I protested yesterday by deleting my Twitter account, and will not go to that platform. Now I'm also deleting my Facebook account, because I don't feel safe being on these accounts. This is a call -- if you are a Tech Maker -- this is a call for people who believe that freedom of speech safeguards all other freedoms. We need to create a blockchain-enabled social media. We need to create social media that is decentralised, that can be used to push for the truth, and cannot be bought. That doesn't have the business model of Twitter which is based on who pays, and they don't care about anything but how many people are signing up for accounts. [Twitter] deleted 70 million fake, malicious accounts this year. Where were they since the company started, and since Saudis began using Twitter to push for human rights? In 2011 when I joined [Twitter], I remember a friend of mine who told me that he'd joined because his mother joined to follow our campaign to enable Saudi women the right to drive. He felt so embarrassed that he didn't have an account on Twitter, and so he joined. That year, the number of Twitter users was 60 million, today it is 380 million. People joined Twitter and these platforms because they believed in these causes, and they believed in the things that we called for. But if the same tools that we used for liberation once are being used to oppress us, are being used to undermine us, are being used to spread hate and fake news -- I'm out of these platforms. I'll continue speaking up because tyrants and dictators are the ones who should be afraid, not us. Lightly edited for continuity and clarity, otherwise as close as possible to the original. https://youtube.com/watch?v=8regaO3hl_g
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Chromecast+Steve Nixon https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!forum/chromebook-central https://support.google.com/chromecast/community?hl=en&vid=0-14873925532-1537804601043 Isn't that just typical Google that there are two places to go? — Google+ is closing down in August 2019. https://plus.google.com/+googleplus/posts/gxoJEZfRjPd https://www.blog.google/technology/safety-security/project-strobe/ Download all your G+ data with Google Takeout. Save it in both JSON and HTML. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Google+ +1s, Circles, Communities, Streams. JSON for program access. The JSON version is more complete so save a copy even if you can't use it straight away. HTML as a quick and dirty way to put an archive on the web. Leave feedback about Takeout limitations. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback Takeout of Communities is very limited. ActivityLog appears to be broken. Talk to other people about all the issues. Google+ Mass Migration group. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 Especially about moving networks of people, contents and community to other platforms. So where are Google Product Support communities going to go?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Jamez Frondeskias See above comments. I'm not sure at all, at all. In the old gmail contacts, there are sections for your circles. But does that mean that people in your circles are in your main contacts list? Or simply that the interface provides a look into the circles and they are actually separate. The new gmail interface doesn't have sections for G+ Circles. — Circles Takeout Export to Google Contacts Import. Choose Takeout G+Circles, CSV format. If you have any circles of > 3000 break it into multiple sheets each of < 3000 rows. Go to https://contacts.google.com/ Choose more, import CSV file. Choose one of your circle files, Import. Merge Duplicates. Repeat for each file. At the end run a find duplicates. It looks to me like Google is querying the G+ Profiles for public information as part of the import. There are no emails or contact info in the Takeout Export. But the Contacts Import was finding them. At the the end, Google Contacts can export the merged files to CSV or VCF for onward export into other systems.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitURL may have changed. https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/oct/27/uk-towns-polarised-by-far-right-sara-khan-counter-extremism-commissioner — This does not bode well. Khan [the counter-extremism commissioner], appointed by Theresa May in the wake of the Manchester Arena attack, told the Observer: “I was really shocked that in every place I visited I heard deep concerns about the activity and impact of the far right. “Councils across the country raised the impact the far-right demonstrations have on whole towns, exploiting tensions and stoking division. I repeatedly heard about a climate of intolerance and polarisation.” One youth worker from the south of England told Khan of his fears that a “whole generation of vulnerable children” could be lost to the far right. Elsewhere, a local education group said it had seen increasing numbers of children making racist and extremist statements in schools. [...] “This backs up what experts have been telling me – that we are seeing a new wave of the far right: modernised, professionalised and growing; supported by a frightening amount of legal online extremist material.” Rowley [counter-terrorism officer of the Met, ret.] warned the public and politicians not to underestimate the situation, describing how National Action, a proscribed neo-Nazi organisation, has “a strategy for a terrorist group” with online information on how to create discord in communities and evade police surveillance.
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Commented on post by Carsten Reckord in Google+ Mass MigrationSomething else to watch out for in Takeout filenames if they somehow end up in HTML Links. I had to go through and remove # / \ characters. Here's some minimal php code (with no error handling or dupe filename checking!). foreach (glob('*.html') as $filename) { $fileNameClean = iconv('UTF-8', 'ASCII//IGNORE', $filename); $fileNameClean = str_replace(array('#','\','/'), '', $fileNameClean); if ($filename != $fileNameClean) { echo "<br />$filename $fileNameClean \n"; rename ($filename, $fileNameClean); $filename = $fileNameClean; } — Has anybody actually had any luck with Takeout exporting their Google+ Stream ActivityLog, JSON or otherwise? It fails consistently for me for at least two and usually all three of these: +1s on comments +1s on posts Comments Everything else I can get just fine, but not these three. In nine attempts across roughly a week, I managed to get one that claimed to contain "Comments.json", but actually didn't, and one that contained a "+1s on comments.json" with some sane-looking data even though the report overview claimed that it didn't.
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Commented on post by SansTheGuardian {Bumblebee} in Google+ HelpHangouts is tightly integrated with GMail and is Google's main current chat system. So unlikely to fade away with the G+ Sunset. However it's the latest incarnation of GChat and Google does seem to like creating new chat systems or migrating and rebranding old ones. So I;d say it's highly likely to change in the next few years. — Guys what will happen to Hangouts once Google Plus shuts down?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI feel the need for a list of code that needs writing. — A reminder: REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Google HTML is absolutely worthless. The instructions don't make this clear, but you're going to see this advice repeated repeatedly and repetitiously. With great frequency. Repeatedly. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format can be used by tools for extraction and import. Tim Berners-Lee is building one for Solid, there will be others. https://github.com/solid/solid-takeout-import (not yet usable, but in process). REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format contains additional, useful, and critical fields for extraction and import to other sites and tools. REQUEST JSON SSSSSSSSCCCCCCccccrrrrraaaaaattttcccch...... <screeeech> Tap. Tap. Is this thing on? Hey folks, we interrupt this beat because I hear that you there, no, no, next to you, there, looking at your phone. Yeah, you, well, uh, I hear that you're thinking: "I don't know what JSON is." "I don't know what to do with JSON". "Heck, I don't plan to take any data out of Google. I'm gonna just #DoTheDataWalkaway ." Hey, cat, like, that's totally cool. I get it. I had a girlfriend who was all into that minimalism stuff. Wicked cool design ethic. But every time I wanted to fry an egg, I had to buy a new frying pan, 'coz she'd, like, donated the old one to charity or something? But she's moved on, and I like totally respect here and stuff.... Where was I? Oh yeah. But, y'see, we're not all like that. And some of us do know what to do with a JSON data extract. And we know that what it does is to make the information we want to use more accessible wherever else we want to use it. And there's a lot of folks who don't know this yet or are confused because, frankly, Google have messed this stuff up in how they do and talk about it. And those people need to know. And so when you're like "all, whatever man" out here on the dance floor, well, it kinda actually fucks shit up and stuff. So like, if you don't mind, please don't. Not here, anyhow? And even if we don't know what JSON is, or how to use it, what we know is that there will be tools created. Maybe by Google (we hope). Maybe by third party sites (and they're doin' just that). Maybe by a close personal friend. Maybe by a particularly talented housecat. But it's gonna happen, and JSON is the way. So. Go back to the phone. Do you important phone stuff. We'll leave you alone. We're cool with that. And let this be the message to the people doing the #GoogleDataTakeaway . Ya still wanna tawk about it? Start a new thread. Hip? Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because Google's generated HTML is an ugly bastard stepchild of HTML that's not actually useful even as HTML. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because you'll give yourself far more options and far fewer headaches down the road. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because even if you can't make heads or tails of the output, the tools likely to be developed for intake to where you want the data to go will. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because your friendly neighborhood hackers (and Space Alien Cats) can hack something together using 'jq' and 'awk' (or Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, ...) if all else fails. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because it's what you actually want. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout (We need a have memes for this.) Where? Here: https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass Migration+Edward Morbius I know, I know. But view source on this. It's really not that bad. https://voidstar.com/Takeout/Google+/Posts/20181016%20-%20The%20more%20I%20dig%20into%20this%20the%20more%20mind_.html — A reminder: REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Google HTML is absolutely worthless. The instructions don't make this clear, but you're going to see this advice repeated repeatedly and repetitiously. With great frequency. Repeatedly. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format can be used by tools for extraction and import. Tim Berners-Lee is building one for Solid, there will be others. https://github.com/solid/solid-takeout-import (not yet usable, but in process). REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format contains additional, useful, and critical fields for extraction and import to other sites and tools. REQUEST JSON SSSSSSSSCCCCCCccccrrrrraaaaaattttcccch...... <screeeech> Tap. Tap. Is this thing on? Hey folks, we interrupt this beat because I hear that you there, no, no, next to you, there, looking at your phone. Yeah, you, well, uh, I hear that you're thinking: "I don't know what JSON is." "I don't know what to do with JSON". "Heck, I don't plan to take any data out of Google. I'm gonna just #DoTheDataWalkaway ." Hey, cat, like, that's totally cool. I get it. I had a girlfriend who was all into that minimalism stuff. Wicked cool design ethic. But every time I wanted to fry an egg, I had to buy a new frying pan, 'coz she'd, like, donated the old one to charity or something? But she's moved on, and I like totally respect here and stuff.... Where was I? Oh yeah. But, y'see, we're not all like that. And some of us do know what to do with a JSON data extract. And we know that what it does is to make the information we want to use more accessible wherever else we want to use it. And there's a lot of folks who don't know this yet or are confused because, frankly, Google have messed this stuff up in how they do and talk about it. And those people need to know. And so when you're like "all, whatever man" out here on the dance floor, well, it kinda actually fucks shit up and stuff. So like, if you don't mind, please don't. Not here, anyhow? And even if we don't know what JSON is, or how to use it, what we know is that there will be tools created. Maybe by Google (we hope). Maybe by third party sites (and they're doin' just that). Maybe by a close personal friend. Maybe by a particularly talented housecat. But it's gonna happen, and JSON is the way. So. Go back to the phone. Do you important phone stuff. We'll leave you alone. We're cool with that. And let this be the message to the people doing the #GoogleDataTakeaway . Ya still wanna tawk about it? Start a new thread. Hip? Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because Google's generated HTML is an ugly bastard stepchild of HTML that's not actually useful even as HTML. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because you'll give yourself far more options and far fewer headaches down the road. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because even if you can't make heads or tails of the output, the tools likely to be developed for intake to where you want the data to go will. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because your friendly neighborhood hackers (and Space Alien Cats) can hack something together using 'jq' and 'awk' (or Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, ...) if all else fails. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because it's what you actually want. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout (We need a have memes for this.) Where? Here: https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Brian Holt Hawthorne Hmmm. I was using the new contacts preview. And that doesn't have circle options in the left hand sidepane. But maybe the circle entries are already in there. Except that after doing the import above, I gained 1000 or so contacts. — Circles Takeout Export to Google Contacts Import. Choose Takeout G+Circles, CSV format. If you have any circles of > 3000 break it into multiple sheets each of < 3000 rows. Go to https://contacts.google.com/ Choose more, import CSV file. Choose one of your circle files, Import. Merge Duplicates. Repeat for each file. At the end run a find duplicates. It looks to me like Google is querying the G+ Profiles for public information as part of the import. There are no emails or contact info in the Takeout Export. But the Contacts Import was finding them. At the the end, Google Contacts can export the merged files to CSV or VCF for onward export into other systems.
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderWill we get to 11b? UN Expects 11.2b in 2100 and with the population still rising. — How will we survive when the population hits 10 billion?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass Migration+Filip H.F. Slagter Those of us who can code might well do the same. And clearly, having the JSON copy gives you options later. So even if you can't do anything with it now, you've got the copy for later when you or other people can do something with it. But for the vast majority of people JSON is useless to them without somebody else's code. And that's what I was really trying to get at. Have a look at the HTML output. The index.html is a horrible mess of javascript. But the individual HTML files aren't too bad. It wouldn't be completely horrible to drop the <body> section into the <content> section of an Atom file. Or as a guide to recreate some html. — A reminder: REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Google HTML is absolutely worthless. The instructions don't make this clear, but you're going to see this advice repeated repeatedly and repetitiously. With great frequency. Repeatedly. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format can be used by tools for extraction and import. Tim Berners-Lee is building one for Solid, there will be others. https://github.com/solid/solid-takeout-import (not yet usable, but in process). REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format contains additional, useful, and critical fields for extraction and import to other sites and tools. REQUEST JSON SSSSSSSSCCCCCCccccrrrrraaaaaattttcccch...... <screeeech> Tap. Tap. Is this thing on? Hey folks, we interrupt this beat because I hear that you there, no, no, next to you, there, looking at your phone. Yeah, you, well, uh, I hear that you're thinking: "I don't know what JSON is." "I don't know what to do with JSON". "Heck, I don't plan to take any data out of Google. I'm gonna just #DoTheDataWalkaway ." Hey, cat, like, that's totally cool. I get it. I had a girlfriend who was all into that minimalism stuff. Wicked cool design ethic. But every time I wanted to fry an egg, I had to buy a new frying pan, 'coz she'd, like, donated the old one to charity or something? But she's moved on, and I like totally respect here and stuff.... Where was I? Oh yeah. But, y'see, we're not all like that. And some of us do know what to do with a JSON data extract. And we know that what it does is to make the information we want to use more accessible wherever else we want to use it. And there's a lot of folks who don't know this yet or are confused because, frankly, Google have messed this stuff up in how they do and talk about it. And those people need to know. And so when you're like "all, whatever man" out here on the dance floor, well, it kinda actually fucks shit up and stuff. So like, if you don't mind, please don't. Not here, anyhow? And even if we don't know what JSON is, or how to use it, what we know is that there will be tools created. Maybe by Google (we hope). Maybe by third party sites (and they're doin' just that). Maybe by a close personal friend. Maybe by a particularly talented housecat. But it's gonna happen, and JSON is the way. So. Go back to the phone. Do you important phone stuff. We'll leave you alone. We're cool with that. And let this be the message to the people doing the #GoogleDataTakeaway . Ya still wanna tawk about it? Start a new thread. Hip? Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because Google's generated HTML is an ugly bastard stepchild of HTML that's not actually useful even as HTML. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because you'll give yourself far more options and far fewer headaches down the road. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because even if you can't make heads or tails of the output, the tools likely to be developed for intake to where you want the data to go will. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because your friendly neighborhood hackers (and Space Alien Cats) can hack something together using 'jq' and 'awk' (or Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, ...) if all else fails. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because it's what you actually want. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout (We need a have memes for this.) Where? Here: https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Terrence Lee Reed Aaaaagh! Yes, the politicians can say "Sorry guys it's impossible, not sensible and bad for the country so we're not going to do it". That causes it's own problems. But seriously. Voting for something as serious as leaving the EU, just to protest against the UK government. It's unbelievably stupid. What did they think was going to happen? — YouGov poll from 23 October: 'In hindsight, do you think Britain was right or wrong to vote to leave EU?' Right 41% Wrong 47% Leavers 85% "right" Remainers 88% "wrong" 18-24 yr olds 65% "wrong" 25-49 53% "wrong" 50-64 52% "right" 65+ 62% "right" Lab 71% "wrong" Con 69% "right" Christ on a skateboard, can this country get more divided?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationSo you export to JSON. Then what? — A reminder: REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Google HTML is absolutely worthless. The instructions don't make this clear, but you're going to see this advice repeated repeatedly and repetitiously. With great frequency. Repeatedly. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format can be used by tools for extraction and import. Tim Berners-Lee is building one for Solid, there will be others. https://github.com/solid/solid-takeout-import (not yet usable, but in process). REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format contains additional, useful, and critical fields for extraction and import to other sites and tools. REQUEST JSON SSSSSSSSCCCCCCccccrrrrraaaaaattttcccch...... <screeeech> Tap. Tap. Is this thing on? Hey folks, we interrupt this beat because I hear that you there, no, no, next to you, there, looking at your phone. Yeah, you, well, uh, I hear that you're thinking: "I don't know what JSON is." "I don't know what to do with JSON". "Heck, I don't plan to take any data out of Google. I'm gonna just #DoTheDataWalkaway ." Hey, cat, like, that's totally cool. I get it. I had a girlfriend who was all into that minimalism stuff. Wicked cool design ethic. But every time I wanted to fry an egg, I had to buy a new frying pan, 'coz she'd, like, donated the old one to charity or something? But she's moved on, and I like totally respect here and stuff.... Where was I? Oh yeah. But, y'see, we're not all like that. And some of us do know what to do with a JSON data extract. And we know that what it does is to make the information we want to use more accessible wherever else we want to use it. And there's a lot of folks who don't know this yet or are confused because, frankly, Google have messed this stuff up in how they do and talk about it. And those people need to know. And so when you're like "all, whatever man" out here on the dance floor, well, it kinda actually fucks shit up and stuff. So like, if you don't mind, please don't. Not here, anyhow? And even if we don't know what JSON is, or how to use it, what we know is that there will be tools created. Maybe by Google (we hope). Maybe by third party sites (and they're doin' just that). Maybe by a close personal friend. Maybe by a particularly talented housecat. But it's gonna happen, and JSON is the way. So. Go back to the phone. Do you important phone stuff. We'll leave you alone. We're cool with that. And let this be the message to the people doing the #GoogleDataTakeaway . Ya still wanna tawk about it? Start a new thread. Hip? Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! Let's get this BEAT BACK ON!!! REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because Google's generated HTML is an ugly bastard stepchild of HTML that's not actually useful even as HTML. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because you'll give yourself far more options and far fewer headaches down the road. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because even if you can't make heads or tails of the output, the tools likely to be developed for intake to where you want the data to go will. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because your friendly neighborhood hackers (and Space Alien Cats) can hack something together using 'jq' and 'awk' (or Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, ...) if all else fails. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because it's what you actually want. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout (We need a have memes for this.) Where? Here: https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout
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Commented on post by Musical One in Google+ Mass Migration+Nishit Dave You can set an FB group to Moderator approved for the membership. — Facebook Pages & Groups I am researching the difference between "Pages" and "Groups" on Facebook. From what I have read so far, Facebook Groups are the closest thing on the Internet to what we know as "Communities" on Google+. If anyone knows of options other than Facebook Groups that are similar to G+ communities, please supply me with links to the websites that offer those options. I would greatly appreciate it! Thank you, "Musical One"
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Commented on post by Martijn Vos in G+ RPG Escape Rocket+Shelenn Ayres Pretty much impossible since there's no way to grab a Community's posts via the G+ API. There's a long outstanding request for that and no hope of the API being enhanced to provide it now. — Turns out it's possible to create an RSS feed of your public posts. Since Hubzilla can follow RSS feeds, this should make it possible to follow public G+ content from Hubzilla. I need to experiment with this. https://gplusrss.com/
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Commented on post by Martijn Vos in G+ RPG Escape RocketI'm glad that appeared again. I wrote PHP code to do the same thing. https://gist.github.com/julian-bond/3938374 Of course, it's got a limited life span. ;) — Turns out it's possible to create an RSS feed of your public posts. Since Hubzilla can follow RSS feeds, this should make it possible to follow public G+ content from Hubzilla. I need to experiment with this. https://gplusrss.com/
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Commented on post by Rosh Jose in Google+ Help+Rosh Jose Click on select none. Scroll down till you find. Google+ Circles Google+ Communities Google+ Stream Click on Google+ Stream to activate it Click on the down arrow Click on Select specific data There's a little popup dialog. Select Posts only. Choose HTML to start with if the data looks useful do it again for JSON. — How to download info, comments and links shared with various circles? Per https://support.google.com/plus/answer/1045788?hl=en, it looks like only +1s, Google+ Circles, Google+ Communities and Google+ Stream can be downloaded. But if I want to download any links or info shared with a circle and any comments made under a post, how do I go about that?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationNext stop. Top 10 Social Networks in China, India and Brazil. Because it' not just English Language any more. And the China ones are huge. Especially Wechat, Weibo and QQ/Tencent For a long time I was really hoping those three would expand and become global, with English sections but it didn't really happen. https://www.dragonsocial.net/blog/social-media-in-china/ — From Russia, With Love
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Commented on post by Rosh Jose in Google+ HelpTry Takeout, G+Streams, Posts, JSON and HTML. You'll get all posts you've made with details of which circles/groups they were posted to. And each post includes the comments from other people. — How to download info, comments and links shared with various circles? Per https://support.google.com/plus/answer/1045788?hl=en, it looks like only +1s, Google+ Circles, Google+ Communities and Google+ Stream can be downloaded. But if I want to download any links or info shared with a circle and any comments made under a post, how do I go about that?
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI expect this to be a common thing. But also I think migrating people and content is going to be hard since G+ Takeout Communities is useless and the FB API is impenetrable. So migration is all about marketing the move and kickstarting the new community on FB. — foodies+ community is headed to Facebook (Not clear if temporary or permanent)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitSings: Where's Je-re-my Cor-byn. While wearing the T-Shirt: Love Corbyn - Hate Brexit And posting to Momentum: Joined Labour for Corbyn, Left over Brexit But then I don't live in the "Labour Heartlands (tm)" that voted Labour in the Election but Leave in the referendum. I truly believe that the graph in the OP is a direct result of Labour's ambiguity on Brexit and their failure to fully come out for Remain. They benefited from a huge influx of young Remainers. And now they've lost them again. — Meanwhile, the stunning performance of Jeremy Corbyn shows as his support among young voters is in... ... free fall.
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Commented on post by Carsten Reckord in Google+ Mass MigrationRepeating myself here. This sequence failed on any filename with a non US-Ascii character. Takeout Zip MS Windows unzip with Zip7 dir /b /O-D *.html > dir.txt notepad++ convert to <a href="$FILENAME">$FILENAME</a> for each row That's like the minimum viable tech solution to turning the takeout into a static archive site on some webhosting. Which means writing code, (bash, php, etc) to iconv rename the files prior to listing them. If it comes to that then you might as well use the code to create the alternate index.html completely. For something that one is only really going to do once. And the reason for doing it is because the index.html provided by Google is *SO F*CKING FULL OF CR*P". Why do Google's programmers like obfuscated javascript libraries and dense, random CSS classes so much? Do they get paid according to how impenetrable their web pages are? Index.html is a web page you're giving to your user, FFS! Feedback sent. — Has anybody actually had any luck with Takeout exporting their Google+ Stream ActivityLog, JSON or otherwise? It fails consistently for me for at least two and usually all three of these: +1s on comments +1s on posts Comments Everything else I can get just fine, but not these three. In nine attempts across roughly a week, I managed to get one that claimed to contain "Comments.json", but actually didn't, and one that contained a "+1s on comments.json" with some sane-looking data even though the report overview claimed that it didn't.
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Commented on post by Jack Samuel in Google+ Help+Kamal Tailor But if you download your posts via Takeout, the comments on those posts from other people are included. So in some circumstances, you can download other people's content. — I've been using Google blogger for a few weeks now and I find it to be an acceptable alternative to Google+ collections. Actually in terms of page view/traffic information I find it to be more useful than collections. And people can subscribe to my blog posts with feed readers or by email. But I'm wondering how safe the Google Blogger platform is from Google deciding to pull the plug on that too? Any thoughts about this? I considered using Word Press for my blog but I like the simplicity of Google Blogger.
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Commented on post by Carsten Reckord in Google+ Mass MigrationThe Activitylog always fails for me. Already posted feedback. — Has anybody actually had any luck with Takeout exporting their Google+ Stream ActivityLog, JSON or otherwise? It fails consistently for me for at least two and usually all three of these: +1s on comments +1s on posts Comments Everything else I can get just fine, but not these three. In nine attempts across roughly a week, I managed to get one that claimed to contain "Comments.json", but actually didn't, and one that contained a "+1s on comments.json" with some sane-looking data even though the report overview claimed that it didn't.
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Commented on post by Jeff Mooallem in Google+ HelpHere's what you need. https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!home — With Google+ being sunsetted, what will be the best forum in the future for questions and answers and community support for Google products?
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderAs always * scale * ! 10GtC/Yr turned into 30GtCO2/yr until the 1TtC of easily accessible fossil carbon is all gone. In one last #terafart . Leading to a temperature rise of at least 5C. And 200k years before CO2 and temperatures drop back again to pre-industrial levels. — Climate change: Five cheap ways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaOne thing I find endlessly fascinating in the Corvids is the social differences between Jackdaws, Rooks and Crows. There's an old English saying that "If you see a rook on it's own, that's a crow. If you see a lot of crows together, they be rooks.". And yet you do occasionally see a murder of crows in a field. It's just that they're all keeping their distance from each other and eyeing each other up for potential rivalry. Whereas the rooks and jackdaws are clearly a tribal group that's constantly talking to each other. And the Rook nation and the Jackdaw nation have a friendly treaty and understanding. — I always thought crows were the most likely animals to develop tools just to shank you.
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Commented on post by Jack Samuel in Google+ Help+Kamal Tailor 1) Got a Citation? Big if True. I'm especially curious about what happens to a G+ Profile. Since the underlying data is part of one's Google Account. The G+ Profile is just one more or less publicly accessible web display of that data. Back in the day prior to G+ there was a thing called Google Profiles. These still exist in the sense that the URLs redirect to the G+ Profile and the data has migrated as the platforms changed. Can we expect this to happen again? http://profiles.google.com https://aboutme.google.com 2) I know individuals are working on Takeout to Atom and Takeout to Blogger. Are you saying Google is also doing this? 3) And the Wordpress developer community. As for Blogger It doesn't have to be done by the platform owner, providing the APIs are rich enough. And they are. — I've been using Google blogger for a few weeks now and I find it to be an acceptable alternative to Google+ collections. Actually in terms of page view/traffic information I find it to be more useful than collections. And people can subscribe to my blog posts with feed readers or by email. But I'm wondering how safe the Google Blogger platform is from Google deciding to pull the plug on that too? Any thoughts about this? I considered using Word Press for my blog but I like the simplicity of Google Blogger.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearI'd just like to note the comparison and commonality between Usenet Newsgroups and mailing lists. Especially as lots of people used the same client to deal with both. And all the problems of archiving, search, trolls, formatting conventions, threading conventions and so on apply to both. And also noting that Googlegroups grew out of a combination of reworking dejanews and competing with yahoogroups. So that now the difference between usenet archives on googlegroups, googlegroups mailing lists and googlegroups web forums are very blurred. And frankly a f*cking mess! I came from Usenet to IRC using a dial up connected PC. And one thing I hated about IRC was that conversations that happened while my PC was off were lost. And being in the UK, that meant that US afternoon and evening posts were never seen. With Usenet it was possible to catch up with conversations that happened while I was away. It also meant that conversations were async rather than IRC's sync. For ages I looked for group messaging that was both real time and async. Finally found it in Skype Groups, except that was limited in group size and then completely screwed by Microsoft. — Google+ and Usenet: An almost wholly inaccurate, incomplete, and useless comparison (Not that that will slow down the critics.) (But please do criticise ... substantively.) Just off the top of my head: Usenet had Newsgroups. Google ... doesn't, though Communities somewhat serve. Usenet newsgroups were not easily extensibile. You had to achieve consensus amongst newsfeeds/hosts to carry new groups. Google Communties can be started by any idiot and often are. Though individuals could host their own newsservers and run whatever groups they wanted within those. This capability is not available within Google. Those free-standing newsservers could, at their option, interoperate with others, and might distribute or restrict distribution of their own local feeds according to local policy. Both Usenet and Google ended up with vast wastelands of unpatrolled feeds, filled with spam, trolls, porn, warez, malware, and worse. Both Usenet and Google ended up with severe moderation issues. Usenet tried Cancelmoose and the Usenet Cabal, Google tried AI. Both failed, if not, wholly, against spam, then in holding the active positively-contributing readers and contributors. Usenet had binaries. Google did not. Usenet supported monospace font and shell-integrated readers (at least for a significant set of users). Google+ did not. Usenet offered client independence. Google+ did not (varying access via APIs, over time, excepted). Usenet offered no central identity Directory. Google+ was billed as a central Identity Directory. In Usenet, any user could claim any identity (including of any other user) at any time. On Google ... creating similarly-named identities is possible (and happens), but directly appropriating another identity isn't. (Usenet effectively federated identity within campuses and delegated discipline to campus sysops an sysadmins who could admonish, or restrict, troublesome users. This scaled to about 140k - 250k users, according to Spafford and Ried's data, cited in John S. Quarterman's The Matrix (1990), which I'm extrapolating out to ~1992 and the opening of the Internet to commercial traffic. Usenet effectively died as a primary channel shortly after, though it persists in a technical sense to this day.) (Usenet also effectively managed identity at the message level, either by implication or, as a minority practice, through PGP-, and later, GPG-signed messages, mostly on official security announcements. Closed feeds / newsservers might also have authentication protocols, details of which I am wholly ignorant.) Usenet carried state in the client, with only an ephemeral feed (1-3 months typically) on servers. If individuals wanted to retain access to content, they were responsible for doing so themselves. Though independent comprehensive archives emerge (and proved highly controversial initially). Google+ is a comprehensive archive: material persists unless specifically deleted by an account's owner, or the account itself is purged. Usenet had no comprehensive search. Google+ didn't for much of its life, but eventually did. Search via archives or centrally-located feeds (Kibo!) was possible, but effectively expensive (resources, location, storage). (Usenet addressed institutional memory and knowledge by other means, mostly as FAQs: distillations of knowledge. Whether or not this proves more useful than search in the long term might make an interesting discussion.) Usenet evolved conventions of posting style, formats, and indications of emphasis, etc., within messages. Those worked ... until they did not. This is actually a central problem with a great deal of communication, and greatly predates electronic media. I believe that human conventions in correspondence formatting in email and usenet are an underappreciated source of frictions. Having participated in discussions ranging from early uni-dominated Usenet to multi-industry email lists (one famously included techies, legal types, media, entertainment, students, business, and more), the cacophany of 1) massive egos and 2) utterly divorced standard (many imposed through client software) in communications lead me to abandon that particular channel, despite its then-storied reputation, in a matter of weeks. Communications are predicated on common standards, and coherence with these. Google+ addressed this largely by forcing single-client (or a very restricted and controlled client-set) usage on the platform, minimising the formatting options (overly much, IMO, but ...), and enforcing a standard structure of discussions in post + flat comments structure. Maddeningly limited, but also sanity-preservingly-consistent. Google scaled this to 3.3+ billion profiles, of which a reasonably impressive few percent were heavy users, and probably 100-300 millions at least occasionally participated in the platform. (That's a high-end estimate, but vaguely within reason.) Simply getting a million or more people to act in ways that don't drive one another into blind rages is an accomplishment. I'm spare with my praise to Google, but they pulled this off, whether by design or accident. I'd really like to see something like Usenet emerge again. I have extreme doubts that it can, outside very limited domains, and with very strong cultural enforcement (the September effect), to create a viable interoperating community. That's disappointing, as the underlying concepts are powerful and useful. Any system relying on multi-client implementations sets itself up for numerous types of failure. Again, said by something who'd very much like to see a multi-client, open-choice environment. It's as if there's a limit to overall liberty, and that increases in one domain must be matched by curtailments in others. I have my doubts about just how true that is, but as a rough heuristic, it may have value.
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Commented on post by Elizabeth Richardson in Google+ HelpWhat do you need it for? — How can I get my a Google + number
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Commented on post by Alma Kraemer in Google+ HelpGoogle Takeout has options for G+Collection and G+Communities but at the moment they're spectacularly useless because they're just lists of URLs back into G+. And Communities are only accessible to the community owner. Please complain here! https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback — What is going to hapen with all the community and collection when G+ close?
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Commented on post by Franz Krauth in Google+ HelpHave you tried Google Takeout G+streams.events? — Any ideas what to do with Google+ events? I have loads of those, and am really sad that it is going away... So I need to find a way to keep the event data and pictures and share it with the same people...
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Commented on post by Jack Samuel in Google+ HelpTo bring this back on topic. 1. Blogger comments are more or less tightly integrated into G+. Some blogs use embedded G+ for comments. Others use the ability to use your G+ profile as the owner. Which then has a link that redirects to your G+ profile. What's going to happen to this? Which then means, what's going to happen to the G+ Profile after the G+ Sunset? 2. An automated route from Takeout G+ stream.Posts to a blogger blog would be a useful tool for preserving your content after the G+ sunset. It would be great if Google could provide this. But even if they din't, it looks like it is possible to create something like this using all the APIs. 3. You mentioned Wordpress. The same function in 2) could be done for Wordpress blogs. Perhaps via a Takeout G+ stream.Posts to Atom utility. Again, Google could help this by providing a Takeout G+ stream.Posts output in Atom format to go with HTML and JSON. These are all questions and functions to throw at Google, especially at the Takeout Feedback form. https://support.google.com/accounts/contact/takeout_feedback — I've been using Google blogger for a few weeks now and I find it to be an acceptable alternative to Google+ collections. Actually in terms of page view/traffic information I find it to be more useful than collections. And people can subscribe to my blog posts with feed readers or by email. But I'm wondering how safe the Google Blogger platform is from Google deciding to pull the plug on that too? Any thoughts about this? I considered using Word Press for my blog but I like the simplicity of Google Blogger.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaThe crows near us have worked out how to create nests out of discarded Lego and Ikea parts. The magpies help them find the allen keys and bolts. — I always thought crows were the most likely animals to develop tools just to shank you.
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Commented on post by Filip H.F. Slagter in Google+ Mass Migration+Filip H.F. Slagter Jokez. I used to be worried that http://bit.ly might disappear and all those permalinks with it. And it was a good thing that http://goo.gl was doing the same function because it was more likely to stay around. — It's a bad sign if the Google employees no longer are using Google's own infrastructure to publish these articles, and instead use competitors such as Medium. Makes you can wonder if Google's Blogger is also slated for termination, like Google+.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google++Cherise Mcbride Takeout G+Communities is just a list of URLs to posts in the community. and there's no way to get from the URL shortcode to the ActivityID longcode that is needed to use the API to get the post. So I'm afraid, current workflow is to bring up each post in turn and cut and paste. Which sucks. — The more I dig into this the more mind boggling I find the decision to sunset G+ - What happens to all those buttons, badges, embedded posts and signins for G+ on other websites? - How do you extract and archive content from within communities? - We now need APIs to extract and archive non-public data. And so on. Pretty much everything here is going to sunset as well. https://developers.google.com/+/web/
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattThis post is more than 280 chars. Twitter doesn't have groups. So by all means micro-blog and announce on Twitter, but where are your long form posts, groups and profile going to be? — Forwarding Card Until we get a viable, open social media network that's controlled by end-users (Solid, I'm looking at you for that path...), I will be moving the locus of my online engagement, slowly but surely, over to Twitter. To be clear, I'll still engage here and I'm not giving up on Google+ (until the very last day). Just making the transition and pinning this post as a pointer. On Twitter: https://twitter.com/gideonro On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheVitalEdge/ On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gideonrosenblatt/ On Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/user/gideonro/ See you there.
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Commented on post by Peter Maranci in Google+ Mass MigrationI wouldn't mind edit access, but don't necessarily need it. We need a row for forum software (Drupal, phpBB, vBulletin) — Due to repeated instances of advertising and screwing with the G+ Alternatives spreadsheet, it is no longer open to public editing. I regret the necessity, but I can't keep working to fix the apparently malicious edits that are being performed by anonymous users. Everyone can still view the document. If you'd like to be able to edit it, please contact me. I appreciate the good work done on the document by members of this community; I'm just sorry that some anonymous bad actors ruined it for everyone.
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Commented on post by Ifinder Ifindi in Google+ HelpTakeout G+Stream.Collections is spectacularly useless. It really just points back into G+. G+Stream.Posts provides all the post content but it although it's got the collections metadata in it, you;d have to work through each one. Going from html to PDF is probably going to mean bringing the post up in a browser and then print to PDF. So. Why do you want PDF? — How to copy all Google+ collections to PDF/PMD, Please ? Link to a relevant post may also enough Regards
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Commented on post by Shelenn Ayres in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearSuggest we talk about Atom instead of RSS. RSS is a useful marketing name, but it makes little sense to still use it as an actual protocol. I hit charset problems with my flintstones approach. G+ mangles your text input as it's being stored. So things like £, é, € and double spaces get stored as UTF-8 (I think). The title and filename approach is then to take the first N chars so these high order characters can end up in the filenames. Different OS then have different ways of dealing with this. A simple dir > dir.txt on a windows command line that is then edited with notepad++ ends up with a quite different character to what's in the filename. Gah! Even if you do simple approaches like this, it forces you to rename all the filenames converting to plain old ascii. Feedback sent. I've hit this post to title+post problem before. - strip tags - take first 256 chars - Split at the first ". " to try and break at the end of the first sentence - if not, split at the last " " to avoid breaking words - Check that your title is > 30 chars. and so on. Title is optional in RSS/Atom. But most consumers of Atom prefer to see one. — Something to explore if able to generate RSS from G+ stream
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationShould forum software be included? Such as Drupal, phpBB, VBulletin. There are others. — Looking for G+ Alternatives? See / add to / verify the G+ Alternatives Spreadsheet If you're looking for a single source for comparison of the options in front of you, especially with a group or Community to migrate, this is a prime tool. You'll find it in the Google+ Mass Migration sidebar (top-bar on mobile-web) under "About Community". https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772/ This has been filled in tremendously since I last looked at it, with 31 options completed (I just added Tildes, a discussion forum type site). +Trey Harris put a lot of work into setting this up, and it's becoming a very useful tool. Take advantage of it. Thanks, Trey, and other compilers! https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1itbLtjWx2Cx88k2pqqwjY2j9vknLhoXpPXU52sTYbrI/edit#gid=0
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Filip H.F. Slagter Blogger does have a POST method for inserting new posts with their comments. These can be either Atom format in Blogger V2 API or JSON in the V3. I think a G+Takeout.streams.posts -> Atom convertor is a good first step to that. It may not be the end goal, but it's a useful step that will teach us a lot about where the problems are. https://developers.google.com/blogger/docs/2.0/developers_guide_protocol — G+ -> Blogger There's a case for providing a utility to make it easy to move your posts and their associated comments from G+ to a Blogger blog. There's a fairly good match (but not exact) between the G+ JSON Takeout format and the Blogger V3 API JSON import/export format. 4 routes to this I can think of. 1) It's self evident that since it all belongs to Google, they are best placed to provide a one click migration from Google Profile to Blogger blog. 2) A Google half way house would be for Google to produce Takeout in Atom format in addition to JSON and HTML. This can be used by the Blogger V2 API import/export. It's also understood and accepted by other blog platforms. (I think) 3) Social media delivery tools. eg IFTTT, DLVR.IT[1] These groups have the capability to do this, but for money. These systems are also biased towards cross-posting new content, not the old archives. 4) User-led development in 2 areas to produce custom code to extend takeout. - Convert Takeout JSON files to Atom - Import Takeout JSON direct into Blogger, WordPress and similar. [1]dlvr.it were one of the groups that used the G+ API to grab new posts and turn them into an Atom feed. For a while there I was using them to auto-crosspost from G+ to Twitter and Facebook. I was also using their Atom feed to import direct into my own blog. Then facebook posting support disappeared. G+ input disappeared. I wrote my own G+ -> Atom utility. So all I've got left now using the dlvr.it free service is an auto-post to twitter whenever I post on G+ via my own atom feed. [cross-posted from a comment on a post in RPG Escape Rocket https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RobertFreemanDay/posts/5827F5R3Aie ]
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Bobbi Jo Woods Don't be quite so defeatist. You * can * get your posts out of G+ with their comments and there's a strong possibility it will be possible to get them into another blogging platform such as Blogger or Wordpress. And the work of people like +Filip H.F. Slagter (and myself) is exactly how that will happen. — G+ -> Blogger There's a case for providing a utility to make it easy to move your posts and their associated comments from G+ to a Blogger blog. There's a fairly good match (but not exact) between the G+ JSON Takeout format and the Blogger V3 API JSON import/export format. 4 routes to this I can think of. 1) It's self evident that since it all belongs to Google, they are best placed to provide a one click migration from Google Profile to Blogger blog. 2) A Google half way house would be for Google to produce Takeout in Atom format in addition to JSON and HTML. This can be used by the Blogger V2 API import/export. It's also understood and accepted by other blog platforms. (I think) 3) Social media delivery tools. eg IFTTT, DLVR.IT[1] These groups have the capability to do this, but for money. These systems are also biased towards cross-posting new content, not the old archives. 4) User-led development in 2 areas to produce custom code to extend takeout. - Convert Takeout JSON files to Atom - Import Takeout JSON direct into Blogger, WordPress and similar. [1]dlvr.it were one of the groups that used the G+ API to grab new posts and turn them into an Atom feed. For a while there I was using them to auto-crosspost from G+ to Twitter and Facebook. I was also using their Atom feed to import direct into my own blog. Then facebook posting support disappeared. G+ input disappeared. I wrote my own G+ -> Atom utility. So all I've got left now using the dlvr.it free service is an auto-post to twitter whenever I post on G+ via my own atom feed. [cross-posted from a comment on a post in RPG Escape Rocket https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RobertFreemanDay/posts/5827F5R3Aie ]
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is Near+emaralive Not just me then.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationI think internal +1s may be in the activity log takeout. But since that breaks all the time I can't tell. All I've got so far is polls I've voted on. — Takeout +1s is fairly useless. - HTML only - Produces a single file of bookmarks - +1s external to Google plus only. Not anything you've +1ed inside G+
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Commented on post by Filip H.F. Slagter in Google+ Mass MigrationBlogger dates to 23-Aug-1999 so it's going to hit 20 years next year. In Feb 2018 it had been a Google property for 15 of those 20. There are numerous blogs still around from the early years[1] that their owners consider their home. So I think it would be a disaster if Google closed it. [1] eg Simon Reynolds. http://blissout.blogspot.com/ — It's a bad sign if the Google employees no longer are using Google's own infrastructure to publish these articles, and instead use competitors such as Medium. Makes you can wonder if Google's Blogger is also slated for termination, like Google+.
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Commented on post by Julian BondThe moral dilemma for Labour MPs that campaigned and voted for Remain but are in Leave constituencies. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/oct/23/brexit-constituents-poorer-leave-labour-second-referendum-phil-wilson-mp#comment-121809958 — Following Saturday's March Against UK-Exit We don't need another referendum or vote for MPs to come to their senses, act in the national interest and say: "You asked us to try and find a way of leaving the EU. Well, we've done our best and we can't find any sensible way of doing that. So we've decided to cancel Article 50 and call the whole thing off. Here's my resignation".
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is Nearstreams.posts 1700 posts 2011-2018, 1.6Gb zip file. It just worked. I've tried most of the other G+ sources and only streams.activityLog just failed.
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Commented on post by Filip H.F. Slagter in Google+ Mass MigrationGoogle Maps still uses http://goo.gl to offer links to share and embed. Go figure. — It's a bad sign if the Google employees no longer are using Google's own infrastructure to publish these articles, and instead use competitors such as Medium. Makes you can wonder if Google's Blogger is also slated for termination, like Google+.
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Commented on post by Robert Freeman-Day in G+ RPG Escape RocketThere's a case for providing a utility to make it easy to move your posts and their associated comments from G+ to a Blogger blog. There's a fairly good match (but not exact) between the G+ JSON Takeout format and the Blogger V3 API JSON import/export format. 4 routes to this I can think of. 1) It's self evident that since it all belongs to Google, they are best placed to provide a one click migration from Google Profile to Blogger blog. 2) A Google half way house would be for Google to produce Takeout in Atom format in addition to JSON and HTML. This can be used by the Blogger V2 API import/export. It's also understood and accepted by other blog platforms. (I think) 3) Social media delivery tools. eg IFTTT, http://DLVR.IT[1] These groups have the capability to do this, but for money. These systems are also biased towards cross-posting new content, not the old archives. 4) User-led development in 2 areas to produce custom code to extend takeout. - Convert Takeout JSON files to Atom - Import Takeout JSON direct into Blogger, WordPress and similar. [1]http://dlvr.it were one of the groups that used the G+ API to grab new posts and turn them into an Atom feed. For a while there I was using them to auto-crosspost from G+ to Twitter and Facebook. I was also using their Atom feed to import direct into my own blog. Then facebook posting support disappeared. G+ input disappeared. I wrote my own G+ -> Atom utility. So all I've got left now using the http://dlvr.it free service is an auto-post to twitter whenever I post on G+ via my own atom feed. — So I am noticing some bloggers (I believe all are from blogger) have their comments "hosted" through G+ Has anyone heard about how that will work when G+ dies? Has any blogger ...err... blogger that uses it been reached out to by Google?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitZut Alors! L'Escargot est le champion! Alez Les Bleus! — The Guardian cartoon on the race to agree a Brexit deal is an absolute joy.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Filip H.F. Slagter Thanks for spotting that. I bet there's more. Isn't it always the way? I think I'll blame Google for using UTF-8 in file names. sigh. — Takeout - G+ Circles Beware. The current data from this takeout option is more or less the same in all 3 formats (CSV, HTML, VCard). First Name Last Name Nickname Display Name Profile URL So a tiny subset of their publicly visible profile information. It's broken out into one file per circle. Missing from that list of files is "Followers". This is really not sufficient on its own to do much of anything with.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass Migrationhttps://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/rwby/images/4/45/82733-why-not-both-meme-5LvD.jpeg/revision/latest?cb=20160618185223 but first, REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout. — A reminder: REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Google HTML is absolutely worthless. The instructions don't make this clear, but you're going to see this advice repeated repeatedly and repetitiously. With great frequency. Repeatedly. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format can be used by tools for extraction and import. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because the JSON format contains additional, useful, and critical fields for extraction and import to other sites and tools. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because Google's generated HTML is an ugly bastard stepchild of HTML that's not actually useful even as HTML. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because you'll give yourself far more options and far fewer headaches down the road. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because even if you can't make heads or tails of the output, the tools likely to be developed for intake to where you want the data to go will. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because your friendly neighborhood hackers (and Space Alien Cats) can hack something together using 'jq' and 'awk' (or Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, ...) if all else fails. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout Why? Because it's what you actually want. REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout REQUEST JSON FORMAT for Google Data Takeout (We need a meme of this.)
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationRe HTML vs JSON. I did a google+.stream.posts takeout in HTML. I then did a directory list in reverse date order of just the html files. Spent 10 minutes or so with a text editor to turn this listing into an index.html file. Uploaded the entire archive to some public hosting. And came up with this flintstones solution. https://voidstar.com/Takeout/Google+/ It's pretty horrible but it does kind of work for minimal effort. There's not much structure or metadata and the filenames as first line of post can be obtuse. But at least it's a publicly accessible archive under my control. — Takeout - G+ Circles Beware. The current data from this takeout option is more or less the same in all 3 formats (CSV, HTML, VCard). First Name Last Name Nickname Display Name Profile URL So a tiny subset of their publicly visible profile information. It's broken out into one file per circle. Missing from that list of files is "Followers". This is really not sufficient on its own to do much of anything with.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI completely agree with the viewpoint on reputation. And I really don't think the UK would be allowed to do this repeatedly. If by some chance the UK does manage to halt the process and back out of it, I'd expect that to be dealt with to make it harder for anyone the next time. But at the same time, the EU has given some hints that if there was a complete change of heart, a change of government, another referendum that voted remain or such like, they would look favourably on a request to cancel Art50 and allow the UK to remain. Even then it's not clear what the terms would be. I don't know if it would go as far as requiring the Euro and Schengen but it might. However I'm sure it would men rolling back any existing concessions. — Twitterthread by Ian Dunt. Brexiter argument today seems to be: Yeah, we know we fucked up, but it's too late now. Not very inspiring. Also wrong.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Alexander Goeres It's not clear to me. But one of the authors has said it can be revoked. And then there's this. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/sep/21/triggering-article-50-reversed-european-court-justice-brexit-bad-dream — Twitterthread by Ian Dunt. Brexiter argument today seems to be: Yeah, we know we fucked up, but it's too late now. Not very inspiring. Also wrong.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Bernhard Suter But Followers is data that I can view from inside G+ https://plus.google.com/people/haveyou "Followers" tab. If I can view it now, and I will lose the ability to do that later, why shouldn't I be able to download it as a list? It would be horrible to do, but in theory I could parse the page and extract the same data available in the takeout downloads. Name, Profile URL, Profile Image. — Takeout - G+ Circles Beware. The current data from this takeout option is more or less the same in all 3 formats (CSV, HTML, VCard). First Name Last Name Nickname Display Name Profile URL So a tiny subset of their publicly visible profile information. It's broken out into one file per circle. Missing from that list of files is "Followers". This is really not sufficient on its own to do much of anything with.
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Commented on post by Jesse Covner in G+ RPG Escape RocketA note about Facebook and the other majors which overlaps with the previous post on "Types" and "Relevant Features". Facebook. Facebook's function is huge. Blogging/Posting, Comments, +1s, Groups, Private messaging, Group messaging, Events, Pages, Marketplace, Friend lists, Photo hosting. And on and on. Since there's no lower limit on post size, it covers micro-blogging as well. There really isn't anywhere else with that breadth of function. So when people criticise a bit of it, be careful which bit they're criticising. This breadth of function, the ability to comment on anything with some threading, the groups and pages and the ability to private message almost anyone turn out to be incredibly useful. The downside is the evil and ads. But at least the ads can be pretty much completely hidden. To repeat. Nothing has as many people or as much function as Facebook. Twitter. I hate Twitter with a vengeance. I wish it would die already. For numerous reasons, it's hopeless for anything except announcing content that is hosted elsewhere. I've repeatedly called it Write-Only-Media. Which can't be right, because people (even me) do read Twitter. But in general they don't reply. The one thing it introduced to the game was being able to follow somebody or thing unilaterally without forcing a bi-directional "friend" link. Mastodon. I wanted to like this. But the lack of groups, lists and noise means it's become worse than Twitter for me. It's Twitter with less function, less people but a slightly larger max post size. I'm not managing to have meaningful conversations on it. Personal Blogs, Blogger, Wordpress, Medium (maybe). There's a place for this. And I think it's long term, long form, archived content. RSS/Atom, announcement on other locations deals with visibility and comments. But the big thing about it is the content should stick around and not 404 with no constraints on size, censorship or whatever. Forums, Drupal, phpBB, vBulletin, etc. These still exist. They still work. They still work great for specific communities of interest like rock-climbing or Kawasaki sports bikes. These days they are easy to throw up on a bit of shared hosting. But admin and moderation doesn't get any easier or less arduous. — *High (but basic) Level Analysis of Social Networks and the G+ Predicament. Part 2: We are Screwed* I wrote Part 1 here ( https://plus.google.com/u/0/+JesseCovner/posts/CPHrkZEaC6M ) You know what is infuriating? At one time I had to figure out that I need to maximize the post then copy the URL from the top bar… What? Google couldn’t have been bothered to built in a simple “permalink” link? Fuck. Anyway… *5. Really Quick and Absolutely Incomplete Analysis of Some Networks* **Facebook**… if 1 was pure evil, and 9 was the dude who tackled a mass-shooter in a wafflehouse, Facebook would be a 0. I’m using it now, but I feel sick. They had no responsibility for their content, other than preventing copyrights being stolen and not showing nipples. It offers a ton of controls for protecting privacy in so much detail that they can say they protect privacy, while making said controls so unwieldy that people don’t understand them… on purpose. That being said, besides the evil issue, the lack of ease of use, Facebook would be the perfect platform for everyone. It provides powerful inner-network social networking, notifying friends of all activity, external visibility of replies, and content discovery. Besides the evil stuff, what Facebook fails at is in it’s exclusivity. It’s very exclusive in that it requires people to sign up to see content by default. But that means nothing because everyone already is signed up. It does not provide clear controls for determining who sees what. Which makes Facebook a critical failure for a lot of popular bloggers who want to have cozy inner groups. And it’s evil. *Reddit*: Reddit is OK as a Social Discussion forum. It has critical mass, external network visibility, and content discovery. It has the ability to follow (in one direction), but does not report below post level about activity. I don’t believe it even shows how many people are following. So virtually no inner-network social networking. It does not give controls over who sees what. So almost no exclusivity. It’s a discussion forum with social networking features, not a social network. It’s moderately evil in that it tolerates some groups which promote extreme views, though as a network it takes responsibility for moderation and does not give everything to Hydra. So it’s good for people who want discussions and are not choosy about with whom. Or at least, for people don’t mind that lots of people can be reading the content, and some of those people are stupid assholes. *Twitter*: I’m not familiar with it so can’t judge exclusivity. It has external visibility in the form of embeding posts. It has lots of social networking potential and content discovery. In terms of Ease of Use, it’s really poor as a blogging platform. Well... it’s not a blogging platform; it’s a content announcement platform, that has a lot of critical mass. So this works really well for publishers and “celebrities” who already have a following. It does not work well for those looking to get fame nor that great for people who want detailed discussions. Not great for social advertising until you form a following. *MeWe*: I know a lot of people are saying MeWe is it. And let’s assume that sooner, rather than later, posts can be shared without losing the by-line. This is still a closed content site: there is no extra-network visibility of anything. You cannot share a link to a MeWe post. It has poor content discovery options, simply displaying the feed from all contacts, which is useless unless your contacts are limited. This is not scale-able. It does not have critical mass in general. I’M VERY SORRY TO SAY THIS. I have met some cool people on MeWe. But right now, this absolutely does not cut it for most people’s needs. You cannot “follow” people, only gain contacts. So it’s a mass of “friends” posting without practical content discovery options, nor detailed exclusivity options. What’s the point of having “friends” then? Sure, it does not productize your data. But it doesn’t do actual social networking functions either. *Blogger / Wordpress*: These are social communities of bloggers, but they are not in themselves social networks that can help people find them from outside the network. *G+*: G+ does everything wrong, but it does enough better than the other sites in certain ways so as to be a great middle ground. It does social networking, but it’s relatively easy to control the exclusivity options. It tried to control evil, and failed, but it gave the impression there was an attempt. It’s forum / blogging interface is piss-poor, but seems better than Facebook and twitter. It link to outside of G+, on the post level, but couldn’t be bothered to make that process clear. It offers OK content discovery… but this got overwhelmed by the final flaw; lack of critical mass meant poor noise control. G+ had critical mass of RPG players, but not enough to sustain it’s business… supposedly. ---- *6. What does G+ mean for shutting down?* G+ provided a middle ground that was acceptable to “RPG Celebrities” , indie publishers, and RPG hobbyists. I think that a lot of “hackers” prefer specialized communities, forum boards, or reddit, where you often get huge forum posts. But now it’s going to be shut down. What does this mean? * First of all, the connections and content from G+ will be lost. This can be partially mitigated, but not by much. Those with reputations outside of G+ can emerge without difficulty. Those connected mainly through G+ will suffer greater loss. *Important*: picking different substitutes without critical mass does not work!!! We are undergoing the destruction of our community. That means fracturing. * A problem which is just as big as the first problem is that there seemingly is no acceptable middle – grounds that can appeal to a critical mass of RPG users like G+ could (in spite of it’s flaws). Facebook is too evil, poor discovery, lack of exclusivity hidden with fake exclusivity, and lack of ease of use. Reddit is barely a social network. Twitter is not really good as a forum. MeWe is very immature and currently a closed network with zero external visibility. *7. What to do?* I may expand on this in a future post, but I would like to recommend the following suggestions. 1. We should experiment with multi-platform solutions with ad-hoc patches. The solution to this could and should use multiple platforms that reference and cooperate with each other on the user and moderator level. This will be difficult to establish as, assuming we can come up with the plan and get people to stick with it, there are no IT policy ( mechanics) that will force compliance. In other words, we need to homebrew solutions that connect one long campaign that would somehow use the Fate, OSR, Call of Cthulhu, and D&D3.5 rules from session to session, with the same story, settings, and characters, with veteran and new players, as well as a lot of drop-in players, and some of the "output" of this campaign would sync with the Pathfinder Adventurers Society. And the campaign must not be rail-roaded but there needs to be Red-Card systems and clear expectations at the table. It can be done, but it will not be easy. Ad-hoc patches represent rules that we push people to abide by that mirror rules on other platforms. *2. Let’s fight.* I mean really… let’s FUCKING FIGHT GOOGLE! Yeah, it’s their platform and they can do what they want with it. But we put spirit, emotion, and trust in this platform. What they are doing is a violation of trust. If that’s what they are going to do, their brand needs to suffer. We should not excuse them. We should not be understanding of their business needs. We need to be shouting this out loud, in strategically selected places, using well crafted and biting language. We need to make Google hurt, as much as we can. Everyone is talking about running. And that’s probably what we need to do in the end. But this community should be fighting as well.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Edward Morbius Well it should redirect to the logged in person's "About me" page where their own personal data is stored along with the permissions of who can see what. Personal contact info Work contact info Work history Education Places Sites Gender, date of birth and more Story Skills and so on. — Takeout - G+ Circles Beware. The current data from this takeout option is more or less the same in all 3 formats (CSV, HTML, VCard). First Name Last Name Nickname Display Name Profile URL So a tiny subset of their publicly visible profile information. It's broken out into one file per circle. Missing from that list of files is "Followers". This is really not sufficient on its own to do much of anything with.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationHaving to think about what else would be useful. In theory, anything on this page that they share with you. https://aboutme.google.com/u/0/?referer=gplus So the blocks marked public or circles where you are in their circles. — Takeout - G+ Circles Beware. The current data from this takeout option is more or less the same in all 3 formats (CSV, HTML, VCard). First Name Last Name Nickname Display Name Profile URL So a tiny subset of their publicly visible profile information. It's broken out into one file per circle. Missing from that list of files is "Followers". This is really not sufficient on its own to do much of anything with.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Help+Peggy K Thanks for that. I knew it must have gone somewhere! — I'm sure it used to be possible to view my own profile as if it was being viewed by somebody else. Did that option disappear, because I'm damned if I can find it? This is all on Desktop web.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearTwo things. 1) It turns out that the G+ API can work with +shortName to retrieve profile info. So it's comparatively easy to extract +shortName from a profile URL and then use people.get to get all the other accessible info. 2) I'm repeating myself, but I think Google's long term plans to provide public access to people's Google Account info is key. If it's likely to stay around, which is preferable, then we can try and pressure Google to provide redirects so that the two URLs (userID and shortName) don't 404. If it's not likely to stay, then we need to build our own stores of vCard data and migrate it to other platforms, even if that's another Google property like GMail contacts. — I've reached out to Ben Smith, VP of Engineering at Google through press@google.com Ben was the author of the Google+ sunset blog post. The Press website and autoresponse promise to ignore me if they won't accept my Krell-issued Altair IV press credentials, so I'm posting this here. If any of my Google followers/contacts care to let Ben know that I'm trying to reach him or, more likely, someone within his team to do an AMA at the Google+ Mass Migration Community, that would be peachy. (Ben ... does not appear to have a visible Google+ profile.) We're hoping to schedule a 1-2 hour AMA by 3 November 2018, and if possible follow-ups at 4-8 week intervals afterward, if possible. Topics for consideration: Some though not all of the questions are referenced in the "PlexodusWiki" FAQ: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/FAQ * Instructions for making Google Data Takeout exports, particularly regarding content, options (JSON vs. HTML), and selections. * Storage and securing of those exports. We're recommending Google Drive presently, or offline Flash/Disk storage. * Tools for importing Google+ data to new services or platforms, including working with third parties for effective and privacy-aware import mechanisms. * Respecting of privacy scope of original data creation. * Online/integrated tools for management. It seems a Google Drive integration, data explorer, and search capability, would be useful. We're not sure that that's feasible. * Post-sunset availability of the present Google+ site, and/or Google+ data. * Impacts and interactions on other Google products and services. Given the ... in retrospect, extraordinarily unfortunate forced integration presented in multiple cases ... there is considerable uncertainty and concern. * Options for ongoing use of Google+ by corporate or noncommercial entities. There's been some interest in this though it's difficult to gauge. * Rough numbers on actively-engaged Google+ users, for which a sense of those posting and commenting actively on the site, excluding bots and spam actors, would be a useful proxy. This is useful for those looking at planning and capacity questions, particularly in self-hosted or community-hosted capacities, as well as commercial services such as MeWe, Minds, Cake, Reddit.needing that.) The forum is G+, the G+MM Community. A Wiki page with format specifications and requirements (the session will require the subject to have a Google+ account) is given below. https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Ask_Me_Anything I am reachable by email: dredmorbius <at> protonmail <dot> com
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearHow times change. Only a little while ago, Robert Scoble would have been high up the list. There's something slightly backwards about this. A notable person ought to be easy to find. And their profile pages ought to have a link to somewhere with the list of all of their online accounts. So finding them on another platform should be easy. And all of this should be indexed by the search engines so it should be easy to search for "Robert Scoble Mastodon", go straight to that profile page and click follow. For us not so notable people we can start this by putting our own list of account profiles somewhere searchable (with rel='me' in the links) and then making sure every account profile has a link back to this list. There's then two related tasks. 1) Try and persuade the notables to do the same 2) Try and persuade the platforms to make "Follow" an easy, easy task when looking at their profile. 2) Should be obvious to platform developers. It's sad how often it isn't or requires numerous clicks and keystrokes. ps. "Notable" not "Deplorable" ;) — The Google+ Notable Names Database If there's someone (not yourself) you think deserves a discoverable future home from Google+ and they are notable, then consider adding them to this page. Please note: PUBLISH WELL-KNOWN SOCIAL MEDIA OR BLOG ADDRESSES ONLY, NOT EMAIL OR OTHER PERSONAL CONTACT INFORMATION, OR CLOSELY-HELD ONLINE IDENTITIES OR PSEUDONYMS. So: if their forwarding information is easily found (and most especially, in a pinned post or their Profile "About" section), fair game. If you had to track this down and there's no clear connection, do not post it. Also do not post direct personal contact information such as email addresses or phone numbers. https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/G%2B_Notable_Names_Database
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Commented on post by Cristian Motoiu in Google+ Helpwe will provide consumers with additional information, including ways they can download and migrate their data. We already have ways to download in Google Takeout. https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout G+ +1s, Circles, Communities, Stream. Although there are some limitations. The data is generally available in VCard and a choice of JSON or HTML. What we don't have yet is advice or tools from Google for migration. The G+ Mass Migration community is exploring these issues. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 — What will happen to g+ posts after August 2019? Posts will disappear from the internet?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Help+Shenan Stanley Have you got anything constructive to say? Because the distraction is being dragged away from my original post. — Google Takeout - Google+ Communities I'm active in a lot of communities on G+ but I don't own or moderate any. I went to Takeout Google+ Communities and it gave me nothing. When I tried to select single communities it didn't offer any. So either this is completely broken or it's only for community owners. Has anyone who owns a community tried to do this? What did you get? The aim here is to archive as much as possible of the content of a community you own/moderate. With a view to moving the content to another platform. Somebody else who has tried to do this says: I’m owner of a community and I only get the community description and image, vCard for all members and a list of all the posts but only as links to G+ posts. One could scrape these for post & comments. It’s not everything but at least it’s a structured starting point. But then what? Because there's no way of getting from a post URL (within the community) to the activityId that the API requires to interrogate a specific post.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitMy fav. Sum Yung Gai with a placard that says "PLACARD". https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — We have the best signs. Believe me, we have the greatest signs.
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Commented on post by Rob Meijer in Google+ Mass Migration+Filip H.F. Slagter Ah, interesting. That wasn't immediately obvious from the docs. — Is there a way to map the G+ URL found in Google Takeout files for group owners to the actual Google identity? It would be interesting to set up an ,(O-AUTH) aggregation service for takeout files that different alternative sites could use to allow group members to rejoin groups they were members of on G+. Is there any technical means to do this mapping?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Help+Shenan Stanley Um, what? — Google Takeout - Google+ Communities I'm active in a lot of communities on G+ but I don't own or moderate any. I went to Takeout Google+ Communities and it gave me nothing. When I tried to select single communities it didn't offer any. So either this is completely broken or it's only for community owners. Has anyone who owns a community tried to do this? What did you get? The aim here is to archive as much as possible of the content of a community you own/moderate. With a view to moving the content to another platform. Somebody else who has tried to do this says: I’m owner of a community and I only get the community description and image, vCard for all members and a list of all the posts but only as links to G+ posts. One could scrape these for post & comments. It’s not everything but at least it’s a structured starting point. But then what? Because there's no way of getting from a post URL (within the community) to the activityId that the API requires to interrogate a specific post.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Help+Shenan Stanley Orkut? Important to me because I posted a lot of content there and ran 3 communities. Then Google took it over ... If not Orkut, how about Buzz. Like G+ , takeout was possible for a while. But the site disappeared. All that content is gone now. — Google Takeout - Google+ Communities I'm active in a lot of communities on G+ but I don't own or moderate any. I went to Takeout Google+ Communities and it gave me nothing. When I tried to select single communities it didn't offer any. So either this is completely broken or it's only for community owners. Has anyone who owns a community tried to do this? What did you get? The aim here is to archive as much as possible of the content of a community you own/moderate. With a view to moving the content to another platform. Somebody else who has tried to do this says: I’m owner of a community and I only get the community description and image, vCard for all members and a list of all the posts but only as links to G+ posts. One could scrape these for post & comments. It’s not everything but at least it’s a structured starting point. But then what? Because there's no way of getting from a post URL (within the community) to the activityId that the API requires to interrogate a specific post.
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Commented on post by Cristian Motoiu in Google+ Help+Davi Silva Santos https://web.archive.org/web/20151007014127/http://orkut.google.com/en.html Which seems to be an Internet Archive capture of the site. Damn hard to find anything in it. — What will happen to g+ posts after August 2019? Posts will disappear from the internet?
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Commented on post by Jürgen Christoffel in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearCan someone who runs/owns/moderates a community do a takeout in JSON and HMTL of a small community and see what comes out? I'm assuming that the list of posts is just a list of URLs which means it can't be used by the G+ API. Is that correct? — Techncial question: I can "takeout" my stuff. But what happens with communities, e.g. this one? Are moderators able to do a "takeout" of their communities postings? If so, this might be a way to share community content: provide a takeout to Google Drive and make this takeout available to members.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Help+Shenan Stanley There's a social ethics issue here. It would be at least polite to let the membership know what was happening. And in the real world that's what happens. I've seen a group that upped sticks and moved to reddit en masse with nobody objecting. Then there's a computing side to this if the posts are public, anyone can view the post and scrape the content. It's just stupidly hard. It seems as though Google is going part of the way there. Owners/Moderators can get a set of VCards containing the publicly viewable data from the member profiles. It also provides a list of posts in the form of the URL for that post. Then there's the comparison with what happens with takeout for your own posts. They turn up complete with lists of +1s and the full content of all the comments on the post. Google doesn't require you to get permission from the people who +1ed or commented on that post. — Google Takeout - Google+ Communities I'm active in a lot of communities on G+ but I don't own or moderate any. I went to Takeout Google+ Communities and it gave me nothing. When I tried to select single communities it didn't offer any. So either this is completely broken or it's only for community owners. Has anyone who owns a community tried to do this? What did you get? The aim here is to archive as much as possible of the content of a community you own/moderate. With a view to moving the content to another platform. Somebody else who has tried to do this says: I’m owner of a community and I only get the community description and image, vCard for all members and a list of all the posts but only as links to G+ posts. One could scrape these for post & comments. It’s not everything but at least it’s a structured starting point. But then what? Because there's no way of getting from a post URL (within the community) to the activityId that the API requires to interrogate a specific post.
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Commented on post by Kenneth Andrews in Google+ HelpAll these questions, and more, are being discussed here. https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/112164273001338979772 — WHAT HAPPENS TO COMMUNITIES? HOW WILL i CONTECT/STAY IN TOUCH WITH COMMUNITIES THAT ARE SO INFORMATIVE WITH INFO ON MUTUAL INTERESTS?ANY ANSWERS,ARE GROUPS MOVING SOMEWHERE OR IS ALL THAT HAS BEEN CREATED JUST FADING AWAY?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ HelpYes, but, as an owner/moderator it's a perfectly reasonable request to be able to archive the contents of the community you started and run. Especially if it's a publicly open community. It may well be that Google considers this an ownership issue but IMHO, they're wrong. As for importing into other platforms, there is a standard and that's Atom. There are numerous platforms (such as Wordpress) that provide tools to take an Atom feed and turn it into posts on that platform. And I've thought seriously about writing a Takeout -> Atom converter even just for my own use. It's not a huge amount of work. Some social media content is indeed ephemeral (eg most of Twitter). Some is much, much longer lived. I've got blog posts on my own site that date back to 2001 and I hope to keep them on the web and avoid them going 404 for some years to come yet with their permanent URLs intact. I feel sure there are posts on Blogger that are as old. There certainly is content on G+ that should be archived and kept accessible, just as there was on Buzz before it. It may feel like there's plenty of time, but the remaining 10 months will go all too soon. So I really hope that Google puts some genuine effort into improving Takeout and even into methods of import into other platforms before it's too late. An example might be an official Google mechanism for moving a whole community to a Blogger blog. But always in the back of my mind is Orkut, that simply disappeared. — Google Takeout - Google+ Communities I'm active in a lot of communities on G+ but I don't own or moderate any. I went to Takeout Google+ Communities and it gave me nothing. When I tried to select single communities it didn't offer any. So either this is completely broken or it's only for community owners. Has anyone who owns a community tried to do this? What did you get? The aim here is to archive as much as possible of the content of a community you own/moderate. With a view to moving the content to another platform. Somebody else who has tried to do this says: I’m owner of a community and I only get the community description and image, vCard for all members and a list of all the posts but only as links to G+ posts. One could scrape these for post & comments. It’s not everything but at least it’s a structured starting point. But then what? Because there's no way of getting from a post URL (within the community) to the activityId that the API requires to interrogate a specific post.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is Near+Edward Morbius I hit a very similar problem with Post URL -> Post ID as well as People URL -> People ID. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/52889020/google-rest-api-is-there-any-way-of-getting-from-a-posts-url-to-the-activityi https://stackoverflow.com/questions/52912674/google-rest-api-is-there-any-way-of-getting-from-a-profile-url-to-the-account But if the Profiles disappear it makes a user visible HTML with links useless regardless of whether you can get at the data via the API now and while the API still exists. The JSON is full of blocks like this. Both for the Post Author block and the commenter author blocks. "author": { "displayName": "Julian Bond", "profilePageUrl": "https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23", "avatarImageUrl": "https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-y6QAo3xqmcg/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAAADT8/W0CEfzDL8dE/s64-c/photo.jpg", "resourceName": "users/106416716945076707395" }, This gets reduced to <a href="https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23" target="_blank" class="author">Julian Bond</a> in the html version. — I've reached out to Ben Smith, VP of Engineering at Google through press@google.com Ben was the author of the Google+ sunset blog post. The Press website and autoresponse promise to ignore me if they won't accept my Krell-issued Altair IV press credentials, so I'm posting this here. If any of my Google followers/contacts care to let Ben know that I'm trying to reach him or, more likely, someone within his team to do an AMA at the Google+ Mass Migration Community, that would be peachy. (Ben ... does not appear to have a visible Google+ profile.) We're hoping to schedule a 1-2 hour AMA by 3 November 2018, and if possible follow-ups at 4-8 week intervals afterward, if possible. Topics for consideration: Some though not all of the questions are referenced in the "PlexodusWiki" FAQ: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/FAQ * Instructions for making Google Data Takeout exports, particularly regarding content, options (JSON vs. HTML), and selections. * Storage and securing of those exports. We're recommending Google Drive presently, or offline Flash/Disk storage. * Tools for importing Google+ data to new services or platforms, including working with third parties for effective and privacy-aware import mechanisms. * Respecting of privacy scope of original data creation. * Online/integrated tools for management. It seems a Google Drive integration, data explorer, and search capability, would be useful. We're not sure that that's feasible. * Post-sunset availability of the present Google+ site, and/or Google+ data. * Impacts and interactions on other Google products and services. Given the ... in retrospect, extraordinarily unfortunate forced integration presented in multiple cases ... there is considerable uncertainty and concern. * Options for ongoing use of Google+ by corporate or noncommercial entities. There's been some interest in this though it's difficult to gauge. * Rough numbers on actively-engaged Google+ users, for which a sense of those posting and commenting actively on the site, excluding bots and spam actors, would be a useful proxy. This is useful for those looking at planning and capacity questions, particularly in self-hosted or community-hosted capacities, as well as commercial services such as MeWe, Minds, Cake, Reddit.needing that.) The forum is G+, the G+MM Community. A Wiki page with format specifications and requirements (the session will require the subject to have a Google+ account) is given below. https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Ask_Me_Anything I am reachable by email: dredmorbius <at> protonmail <dot> com
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in PLExodus: The Beginning is NearA key question that is emerging is what happens to the public account profile page. Both what still remains and also if it will redirect somewhere else. Presumably the profile data one enters in aboutme will remain, but it's useless if it's not visible to others. Part of the issue here is that the Takeout data references and points to lots of profile URLs so even if the Takeout is archived it could end up with numerous links that will 404. — I've reached out to Ben Smith, VP of Engineering at Google through press@google.com Ben was the author of the Google+ sunset blog post. The Press website and autoresponse promise to ignore me if they won't accept my Krell-issued Altair IV press credentials, so I'm posting this here. If any of my Google followers/contacts care to let Ben know that I'm trying to reach him or, more likely, someone within his team to do an AMA at the Google+ Mass Migration Community, that would be peachy. (Ben ... does not appear to have a visible Google+ profile.) We're hoping to schedule a 1-2 hour AMA by 3 November 2018, and if possible follow-ups at 4-8 week intervals afterward, if possible. Topics for consideration: Some though not all of the questions are referenced in the "PlexodusWiki" FAQ: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/FAQ * Instructions for making Google Data Takeout exports, particularly regarding content, options (JSON vs. HTML), and selections. * Storage and securing of those exports. We're recommending Google Drive presently, or offline Flash/Disk storage. * Tools for importing Google+ data to new services or platforms, including working with third parties for effective and privacy-aware import mechanisms. * Respecting of privacy scope of original data creation. * Online/integrated tools for management. It seems a Google Drive integration, data explorer, and search capability, would be useful. We're not sure that that's feasible. * Post-sunset availability of the present Google+ site, and/or Google+ data. * Impacts and interactions on other Google products and services. Given the ... in retrospect, extraordinarily unfortunate forced integration presented in multiple cases ... there is considerable uncertainty and concern. * Options for ongoing use of Google+ by corporate or noncommercial entities. There's been some interest in this though it's difficult to gauge. * Rough numbers on actively-engaged Google+ users, for which a sense of those posting and commenting actively on the site, excluding bots and spam actors, would be a useful proxy. This is useful for those looking at planning and capacity questions, particularly in self-hosted or community-hosted capacities, as well as commercial services such as MeWe, Minds, Cake, Reddit.needing that.) The forum is G+, the G+MM Community. A Wiki page with format specifications and requirements (the session will require the subject to have a Google+ account) is given below. https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Ask_Me_Anything I am reachable by email: dredmorbius <at> protonmail <dot> com
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Commented on post by Rob Meijer in Google+ Mass MigrationThis starts with the question of whether Google Profiles or Account Pages or whatever still exists after G+ Sunset. And where profilePageUrl will redirect to or if it will just 404. The JSON files from takeout have entries like this. "creationTime": "2011-08-21 17:28:29+0000", "author": { "displayName": "Stef Kunzer", "profilePageUrl": "https://plus.google.com/+SteveKunzer", "avatarImageUrl": "https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Na1TcEWJkfg/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAABsNA/72uWmmVbCWg/s64-c/photo.jpg", "resourceName": "users/107704291973085041225" So there is a map in there for URL <-> Profile identifier. However, you can't use the G+ API to do people.get using the URL name. eg SteveKunzer. Only the identifier 107704291973085041225. The HTML version of takeout builds links to commenters/posters profile pages but uses the profilePageUrl. — Is there a way to map the G+ URL found in Google Takeout files for group owners to the actual Google identity? It would be interesting to set up an ,(O-AUTH) aggregation service for takeout files that different alternative sites could use to allow group members to rejoin groups they were members of on G+. Is there any technical means to do this mapping?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt was massive. We got to Trafalgar sq with a big march behind us to meet people coming back up Whitehall saying that Parliament Sq was rammed and they couldn't get beyond Downing St. We couldn't get more than 50m down Whitehall before we gave up and headed out. Quite a crowd control problem. It was bigger than anything else I've been on and comparable to the big Stop The War march. Heard a few impromptu "Where's Jeremy Corbyn". — Live coverage of the People's Vote march from the Guardian. Not a gammon in sight. The organisers estimate 570,000 people on the march, the Guardian uses presently a more conservative older estimate of 100,000.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+D Doc That's why I keep referring to it as UK-Exit. Reminds people that it's the United Kingdom that's leaving not Great Britain. — U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is said to be ready to ditch one of her key Brexit demands in order to resolve the vexed issue of the Irish border and clear the path to a deal, according to people familiar with the matter. Big if true. She seems to want to ditch the time limit on the backstop. Which could keep the UK inside the customs union and the common market indefinitely. So how is she going to explain that to the DUP?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWould BRINO be acceptable to the EU and N.Ireland? Obviously not acceptable to lots of other people. As for single market, the problem is partial versus full. Goods only is cherry picking so no good for the EU. Full single market means we haven't left and has lots of other implications so no good for the ERG. No UK-Exit is better than a bad UK-Exit. And there are no good UK-Exits. Quite angry about the Labour sloganeering of "If the Tories can't negotiate Brexit, they should give it to somebody who can" when it's pretty obvious that Labour would find it just as impossible. — U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is said to be ready to ditch one of her key Brexit demands in order to resolve the vexed issue of the Irish border and clear the path to a deal, according to people familiar with the matter. Big if true. She seems to want to ditch the time limit on the backstop. Which could keep the UK inside the customs union and the common market indefinitely. So how is she going to explain that to the DUP?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Mixology 🍸And round we go again. This time with - 40ml Havana Club 7 - 20ml Punt E Mes - 2.5ml Grenadine - 6 drops Angostura Lush! This one brought to you via G+ closing down, Google Takeout and a fast scan of all the bollocks I've written in 7 years on this platform. — I need a name for this. - 40ml Dark Rum - 20ml Red Vermouth - 2.5ml Grenadine - 6 drops Angostura It's good, btw! Loosely based on something called a "Master at Arms" which is dark rum, port evaporation and home made Grenadine at Zetters Townhouse bar in London.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google+Um. Stackoverflow tells me that the answer is "you can't". There's no route from post url to post activityId. So I have two options. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/52889020/google-rest-api-is-there-any-way-of-getting-from-a-posts-url-to-the-activityi 1) Try and get Takeout to add ActivityID to streams.post.json. Unlikely. Apart from providing feedback, who would you ask? 2) Try and replicate Takeout to access the same posts via activities.search, activities.list and activities.get. Except that AFAIK, those can't access non-public posts or posts in communities which Takeout does. — activities.get requires an activityId. Is there any way of getting from a Post's URL to the activityId? Because as far as I can see Google's Takeout JSON doesn't include activityId which means there's no easy way for me to use the API to gather other info about the post.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google++Yash Trivedi https://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/google-plus is a lot closer than just the front page. +Allen Firstenberg G+ is continuing for GSuite customers. So presumably the API will continue as well? Take your point about there being no Google people here. But there is still a community of developers here. For a while anyway. I'm seriously thinking about writing some code to help me migrate my copy of Google Takeout into a blog platform. Maybe that will help others as well, even if it is likely to be in PHP! The problem is that takeout isn't quite good enough on it's own. But neither is the API. I've written code to turn a person's public posts into an Atom feed and have been using it myself for quite a while now. So there's potential there to turn the Takeout output into an Atom feed or possible to use activities.list, .get and .search into a set of Atom feeds. Given that a lot of other platforms can import Atom this might be a route into a migration utility. — activities.get requires an activityId. Is there any way of getting from a Post's URL to the activityId? Because as far as I can see Google's Takeout JSON doesn't include activityId which means there's no easy way for me to use the API to gather other info about the post.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google++Yash Trivedi I know. And I wish you'd given a URL? :( But then this community is still an entry on this page. https://developers.google.com/+/web/support — activities.get requires an activityId. Is there any way of getting from a Post's URL to the activityId? Because as far as I can see Google's Takeout JSON doesn't include activityId which means there's no easy way for me to use the API to gather other info about the post.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationYes, I've posted feedback. Yes, you got the description right. I guess we need a list of questions for Google. Of course I'm not sure how we get answers! - What happens to G+ Profiles? And the URL they exist on. - Will there be a public visible version of a Google Account "About Me" information? - Will G+ content stay up on the web read only? As a permanent fixture or for a period of transition time? — Getting your Google Data Takeout is only the start of the problem. Working with the data is most of it. This post is adapted from a comment I'd just made to a Plusser and G+MM Community member, and should be useful to many of you. Downloading and safekeeping your Google Takeout archive is only a first step, and there's far more work involved in safely turning into something useful. I've contacted Google, and will continue to contact them, requesting BOTH that they develop, AND communicate clearly timetables and capabilities, tools for processing, managing, filtering, and uploading extracts. First: You need to store the archive somewhere safe. Google Drive is one of the options Google offers and it's probably a very good one to use. Google already knows everything, so you're not publishing the data to other third parties. If Google develop tools for accessing, filtering, and importing data to other services, _there's some chance they'll do so using Web-based methods, and will support Google Drive based archives directly. (I don't know this, but I suspect this, and it would be a goddamned wise thing to do. My record on nudging Google on all these points is mixed, though miracles sometimes occur.) The alternative is that we here, or target platforms independently, develop parsing and uptake systems for your G+ archive. That runs numerous risks, with the one I'm most concerned about is the publishing of what had originally been private data. If that happens at scale (and Google's operations are nothing but scale), it can cause a lot of pain, grief, headache, and very much worse for a lot of people. As it happens ... in another and earlier life, I may or may not have been involved in data analysis and warehousing and what's known as ETL: extract, transform, and load. The G+ data migration process is basically an ETL task. It's an incredibly tedious job to do manually. I've seen situations where it takes weeks or months to match up source and destination data systems, and it's all kinds of awful. Much of the data never really gets through, and it's considered skilled and specialised work. Imposing that on many thousands to millions, or billions, of lay-public Google customers is kind of ridiculous. This problem is big enough and affecting enough people that I recommend getting the support of legislators and consumer advocates inside and outside of government. In the U.S., this means your state and national legislators (congressional and senate representatives), as well as your state Attorney General's office, in most cases. Support elsewhere -- the EU, Canada, Australia, UK, Japan, India, etc., will differ. Google+ has significant usage in most of these regions. So again: Request a Data Take Out. And request JSON rather than HTML formats, for further processing. Store that in a safe and secure location. Google Drive, or offline DVD/BluRay, Flash drive, or backup-drive storage is going to be the safest option. Press Google both to produce tools for curating and importing this data elsewhere AND to keep people informed as to what capabilities will be available and when. (Answering that question should be somebody's headache within Google presently...) Actually, tell you what: I'm just going to copy and past this comment directly into Google's Feedback dialog, and post it to the Community, noting we're about 2,300 strong already and growing.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI'm tempted to just throw the takeout HTML archive up on a public server. And then trim the index.html by hand so it's just a list of links to the posts. So basically don't attempt to do anything programmatically with the data. Just make sure it doesn't disappear off the web forever. — Getting your Google Data Takeout is only the start of the problem. Working with the data is most of it. This post is adapted from a comment I'd just made to a Plusser and G+MM Community member, and should be useful to many of you. Downloading and safekeeping your Google Takeout archive is only a first step, and there's far more work involved in safely turning into something useful. I've contacted Google, and will continue to contact them, requesting BOTH that they develop, AND communicate clearly timetables and capabilities, tools for processing, managing, filtering, and uploading extracts. First: You need to store the archive somewhere safe. Google Drive is one of the options Google offers and it's probably a very good one to use. Google already knows everything, so you're not publishing the data to other third parties. If Google develop tools for accessing, filtering, and importing data to other services, _there's some chance they'll do so using Web-based methods, and will support Google Drive based archives directly. (I don't know this, but I suspect this, and it would be a goddamned wise thing to do. My record on nudging Google on all these points is mixed, though miracles sometimes occur.) The alternative is that we here, or target platforms independently, develop parsing and uptake systems for your G+ archive. That runs numerous risks, with the one I'm most concerned about is the publishing of what had originally been private data. If that happens at scale (and Google's operations are nothing but scale), it can cause a lot of pain, grief, headache, and very much worse for a lot of people. As it happens ... in another and earlier life, I may or may not have been involved in data analysis and warehousing and what's known as ETL: extract, transform, and load. The G+ data migration process is basically an ETL task. It's an incredibly tedious job to do manually. I've seen situations where it takes weeks or months to match up source and destination data systems, and it's all kinds of awful. Much of the data never really gets through, and it's considered skilled and specialised work. Imposing that on many thousands to millions, or billions, of lay-public Google customers is kind of ridiculous. This problem is big enough and affecting enough people that I recommend getting the support of legislators and consumer advocates inside and outside of government. In the U.S., this means your state and national legislators (congressional and senate representatives), as well as your state Attorney General's office, in most cases. Support elsewhere -- the EU, Canada, Australia, UK, Japan, India, etc., will differ. Google+ has significant usage in most of these regions. So again: Request a Data Take Out. And request JSON rather than HTML formats, for further processing. Store that in a safe and secure location. Google Drive, or offline DVD/BluRay, Flash drive, or backup-drive storage is going to be the safest option. Press Google both to produce tools for curating and importing this data elsewhere AND to keep people informed as to what capabilities will be available and when. (Answering that question should be somebody's headache within Google presently...) Actually, tell you what: I'm just going to copy and past this comment directly into Google's Feedback dialog, and post it to the Community, noting we're about 2,300 strong already and growing.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationGah! The only unique post identifier in the takeout data (both JSON and HTML) is the URL. And there's no way to go from the URL to the G+ internal identifier activities.activityId And you need the activityId to use the API to get any information with activities.get. This is made worse because the Takeout system can get at data such as non-public posts and community posts which aren't accessible via the API. The Takeout data has extensive links to G+ Profiles and G+ Post URLs which of course will disappear after the sunset. So the data will be heavily affected by bitrot the moment G+ disappears. So what we get in the takeout is - a G+ unique layout, not standards based (such as Atom) - contains links to temporary URLs that will 404 in 10 months - is missing unique IDs that might allow expanding the data via the API in the mean time current mood: disheartened — Getting your Google Data Takeout is only the start of the problem. Working with the data is most of it. This post is adapted from a comment I'd just made to a Plusser and G+MM Community member, and should be useful to many of you. Downloading and safekeeping your Google Takeout archive is only a first step, and there's far more work involved in safely turning into something useful. I've contacted Google, and will continue to contact them, requesting BOTH that they develop, AND communicate clearly timetables and capabilities, tools for processing, managing, filtering, and uploading extracts. First: You need to store the archive somewhere safe. Google Drive is one of the options Google offers and it's probably a very good one to use. Google already knows everything, so you're not publishing the data to other third parties. If Google develop tools for accessing, filtering, and importing data to other services, _there's some chance they'll do so using Web-based methods, and will support Google Drive based archives directly. (I don't know this, but I suspect this, and it would be a goddamned wise thing to do. My record on nudging Google on all these points is mixed, though miracles sometimes occur.) The alternative is that we here, or target platforms independently, develop parsing and uptake systems for your G+ archive. That runs numerous risks, with the one I'm most concerned about is the publishing of what had originally been private data. If that happens at scale (and Google's operations are nothing but scale), it can cause a lot of pain, grief, headache, and very much worse for a lot of people. As it happens ... in another and earlier life, I may or may not have been involved in data analysis and warehousing and what's known as ETL: extract, transform, and load. The G+ data migration process is basically an ETL task. It's an incredibly tedious job to do manually. I've seen situations where it takes weeks or months to match up source and destination data systems, and it's all kinds of awful. Much of the data never really gets through, and it's considered skilled and specialised work. Imposing that on many thousands to millions, or billions, of lay-public Google customers is kind of ridiculous. This problem is big enough and affecting enough people that I recommend getting the support of legislators and consumer advocates inside and outside of government. In the U.S., this means your state and national legislators (congressional and senate representatives), as well as your state Attorney General's office, in most cases. Support elsewhere -- the EU, Canada, Australia, UK, Japan, India, etc., will differ. Google+ has significant usage in most of these regions. So again: Request a Data Take Out. And request JSON rather than HTML formats, for further processing. Store that in a safe and secure location. Google Drive, or offline DVD/BluRay, Flash drive, or backup-drive storage is going to be the safest option. Press Google both to produce tools for curating and importing this data elsewhere AND to keep people informed as to what capabilities will be available and when. (Answering that question should be somebody's headache within Google presently...) Actually, tell you what: I'm just going to copy and past this comment directly into Google's Feedback dialog, and post it to the Community, noting we're about 2,300 strong already and growing.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI've been digging around in the HTML and JSON exports. They seem to contain content that I don't think you can get at via the G+ API. So it's a more complete set. But just like the API it's a snowflake view of the data. It's quite a long way from any standards based view of the content that other systems might be able to import. So I'm thinking that a service/code that converts the takeout stream.posts output to an atom file would be useful. Because there are a number of blogging service that can create posts from an Atom feed. A big problem here is the sheer quantity of data. — Getting your Google Data Takeout is only the start of the problem. Working with the data is most of it. This post is adapted from a comment I'd just made to a Plusser and G+MM Community member, and should be useful to many of you. Downloading and safekeeping your Google Takeout archive is only a first step, and there's far more work involved in safely turning into something useful. I've contacted Google, and will continue to contact them, requesting BOTH that they develop, AND communicate clearly timetables and capabilities, tools for processing, managing, filtering, and uploading extracts. First: You need to store the archive somewhere safe. Google Drive is one of the options Google offers and it's probably a very good one to use. Google already knows everything, so you're not publishing the data to other third parties. If Google develop tools for accessing, filtering, and importing data to other services, _there's some chance they'll do so using Web-based methods, and will support Google Drive based archives directly. (I don't know this, but I suspect this, and it would be a goddamned wise thing to do. My record on nudging Google on all these points is mixed, though miracles sometimes occur.) The alternative is that we here, or target platforms independently, develop parsing and uptake systems for your G+ archive. That runs numerous risks, with the one I'm most concerned about is the publishing of what had originally been private data. If that happens at scale (and Google's operations are nothing but scale), it can cause a lot of pain, grief, headache, and very much worse for a lot of people. As it happens ... in another and earlier life, I may or may not have been involved in data analysis and warehousing and what's known as ETL: extract, transform, and load. The G+ data migration process is basically an ETL task. It's an incredibly tedious job to do manually. I've seen situations where it takes weeks or months to match up source and destination data systems, and it's all kinds of awful. Much of the data never really gets through, and it's considered skilled and specialised work. Imposing that on many thousands to millions, or billions, of lay-public Google customers is kind of ridiculous. This problem is big enough and affecting enough people that I recommend getting the support of legislators and consumer advocates inside and outside of government. In the U.S., this means your state and national legislators (congressional and senate representatives), as well as your state Attorney General's office, in most cases. Support elsewhere -- the EU, Canada, Australia, UK, Japan, India, etc., will differ. Google+ has significant usage in most of these regions. So again: Request a Data Take Out. And request JSON rather than HTML formats, for further processing. Store that in a safe and secure location. Google Drive, or offline DVD/BluRay, Flash drive, or backup-drive storage is going to be the safest option. Press Google both to produce tools for curating and importing this data elsewhere AND to keep people informed as to what capabilities will be available and when. (Answering that question should be somebody's headache within Google presently...) Actually, tell you what: I'm just going to copy and past this comment directly into Google's Feedback dialog, and post it to the Community, noting we're about 2,300 strong already and growing.
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Commented on post by Robyn Richards in Google+ Mass MigrationThis is another take on what I was trying to get at with https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23/posts/3wo7UBq8Si6 — I saw this article and it made me think of you guys.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Shelenn Ayres https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout Google+ Communities Click on Select communities radio button Click on Google+ Communities button I get "Select communities", a toggle all checkbox and no communities below it. I can only assume I'm not offered any communities because I don't own any because I certainly belong to some. (like this one!) — Google Takeout - Google+ Communities I'm active in a lot of communities on G+ but I don't own or moderate any. I went to Takeout Google+ Communities and it gave me nothing. When I tried to select single communities it didn't offer any. So either this is completely broken or it's only for community owners. Has anyone who owns a community tried to do this? What did you get?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationI was only expecting my posts in communities and possibly my comments but I'm not getting anything. I think this MIGHT turn up in G+Streams.ActivityLog and I'm currently collecting this to see. I also think it's likely to be buried in all the other stuff in Activity. If I owned a community, I'd expect to get the whole community content, not just my contributions. That might allow you to move the community as a whole to another platform and preserve the archive. Which is a reasonable use case. But I don't own a community so can't check that. — Google Takeout - Google+ Communities I'm active in a lot of communities on G+ but I don't own or moderate any. I went to Takeout Google+ Communities and it gave me nothing. When I tried to select single communities it didn't offer any. So either this is completely broken or it's only for community owners. Has anyone who owns a community tried to do this? What did you get?
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Commented on post by Dave Hill in Geekery and NerditudePretty sure all that will happen is I'll stop using G+. I'll continue to use Facebook, Twitter, Mastodon, Reddit and a personal blog. — Yet more pondering out loud over where to move to from Google+ I'm not finding either MeWe or Pluspora satisfying -- not to the point of wanting to quit either one, quite, but ... MeWe feels like I'm wading though glue every time I'm on the site, between the interface speed, the number of clicks to read and find stuff, and the constrained layout. I'm also annoyed at the cap on image uploads (ch-ching), which will add to the effort cost of using the service. Some of the visibility issues I've been concerned about might be going away with promised upcoming releases, but it has yet to feel like a place I am comfortable working in. Pluspora is snappy in performance, and I like the general way it groups and sorts info. But the interface is relatively crude, stuff doesn't always seem to work as expected, and I remain dubious about the whole distributed / federated Diaspora-etc-verse as a long-term platform that will survive and be stable, let alone see significant UI improvement over time. That last element about viability to me is important for both of these platforms. MeWe and the D* Federation are both small beans, even if they see a bump from the G+ shutdown. Their operation and sustainability models are both quite different, from what I can glean, but neither feels stable or perhaps even viable in the long haul. (Of course, on the Internet, nothing is necessarily stable or viable for the long haul. E.g., Google+.) Maybe I need to get back to looking at my use cases for a Social Media platform, just like a Project Manager would: 1. I want a place where I can share the stuff I find cool, thought-provoking, cathartic, cute, or whatever. 2. I want to see stuff that others find cool, thought-provoking, cathartic, cute, or whatever, with the ability to narrow down with whom I'm chatting. 3. I want a community that can and will discuss the above two items with me. Shouting into the darkness is not what I'm wanting. I'm looking for people I like, trust, respect, and/or enjoy being around. (I've had such a community at G+; where they are going matters.) I want to be able to kick people out of the conversation who are being deplorable. 4. I want the ability to use my WordPress blog as a canonical repository for as much of the stuff I write (and even comment on) as possible. That's my backup, and why G+'s closure hasn't hit me as hard as some. Promises that I can extract the data I put up there don't mean a lot to me; I want something ongoing and easy. 5. I want things to be as stable and long-lived as possible (with the understanding there are no guarantees, but taking what steps I can to make it that way). So beyond the above two choices (and with Pluspora include the other D* sites and Friendica and Hubzilla and that whole creaking federation), what else is there? A. Something New - People have recommended a number of other alternatives (e.g., Mind, Dreamwidth, etc.). But they seem to all have very thin slices of the pie, making both the Community and Stability aspects dodgy. B. Facebook - So everyone gasps at that, since the first words out of everyone's mouth outside of Facebook is "Never Facebook!" And, yes, it's a horribly run site, as far as exploiting user data. Is that the highest priority for me? I know folks who have actually taken serious discussions over to FB. It's certainly a (relatively) stable setup, it has the horsepower (even if the interface has some interesting gaps). A lot of the community I've had isn't there, but a lot of it is, in some measure. FB doesn't make it easy to get data out, but there are ways to work around that. C. Twitter - Everyone, after saying NO to Facebook, follows with Twitter being unusable for reasons of tweet length, difficulty of dialog, and trolls. The first is probably the biggest issue ... but, then, nothing says I can't do long-form stuff in WordPress and publish to Twitter, and use Twitter for the short shares and suck it back into WordPress. I would leave some community behind, but some of it actually is there. D. Tumblr - At least one correspondent (+John E. Bredehoft) is using this tool, and its visibility and interoperability are pretty darned good. I find dialog on Tumblr tough, though, and I worry a bit about its long-term viability under Oath. Also, it just ... man, Tumbler seems mainly for image shares, more than serious blogging (less so than Pinterist, to be sure, but in that same ballpark). E. Reddit - I've seen serious suggestions about this. While Reddit sometimes seems like a cess pool in some of its zanier corners, I have no sense as to whether it would serve my blogging purposes. Anyone with more info is welcome to chime in. F. Just Use My Blog - If I write it, will they come? I can post stubs, at least, out to other sites (FB, Twitter, even D* with some add-ons), but I know that ends up with fragmented discussions and overall lowered engagement. But, hell, maybe I should just go back to the old way of doing things, when bloggers were bloggers, and RSS roamed the Earth. No conclusions here, just continuing to work some of these issues out by nattering out loud.
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Commented on post by Phạm Chung Hiếu in Google+ Mass MigrationI've just discovered my takeout zip of 375 posts on Google Buzz between 10-02-2010 and 04/11/2011 Which is nice. Included in there is a post on Buzz saying "I seem to have made it into G+ and apparently I can invite people." — To the folks who have already downloaded and opened your takeout files, is there text posts, comments or other stuff like commenter account...
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Commented on post by Brian Holt Hawthorne in Google+ Mass MigrationI was wondering where this had got to. https://code.google.com/archive/p/google-plus-platform/issues/139 For a long time Google had an issue tracker for the G+ API. At some stage they basically moved to stack overflow and archived the old tracker. When this was done all the names were obfuscated to protect the innocent. This post was by me and apparently I became "Swift Kangeroo". Which I rather like. I think I might use that next time I need a quasi-anonymous alias! Any road up, the request is from Dec 16, 2011 and is for an Atom feed of a profile's stream of posts. We never got it. — Back before twitter introduced the concept of micro-blogging, we had actual blogs (web-logs). One of the most powerful parts of blogs was near-universal syndication using a few standards such as RSS. Then, along came walled gardens like Twitter and Google+, and suddenly you needed a separate app or web site for each. Google+ was compelling enough for me that I basically stopped reading blogs, except those linked to from Google+. Now that Google+ is going away, I am rethinking that decision. I’ve installed Feedly and I’m slowly adding all the blogs of people whom I used to just follow on Google+. Some of these are standalone Wordpress blogs. Some are journals on Dreamwidth. I’m sure I will find others. But however many people are moving to MeWe or pluspora or whatever, if it doesn’t support RSS syndication, I probably won’t be interacting with them much. I’ve downloaded apps for all those that have it, but I can’t see myself making the mistake of investing in any one self-enclosed site again. I am tired of walled gardens. I am tired of “social media” meaning a proprietary website. I am tired of seeing distributed problems solved and then those solutions destroyed by Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon. Before walled-gardens nearly killed blog syndication, we saw global standards like XMPP/Jabber that allowed universal chat through many services (AIM, iChat, Google Chat) with a single app destroyed by new proprietary systems and refusal to continue to use standards. So, MeWe is great, but without RSS support (which it will never have because of its privacy model), I won’t use it often. Pluspora (and diaspora) will consume RSS feeds, but unless I am missing something, it won’t generate RSS feeds. [ Update: +Edward Morbius points out you can follow a diaspora feed in Feedly https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/47cw3hzPmTv ] So, I am going back to reading blogs. I’ll probably resurrect one of my old blogs, or start a new one, and wash my hands of the whole walled-garden social media concept.
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Commented on post by Phạm Chung Hiếu in Google+ Mass MigrationHas * anyone * got data out with takeout and then done something useful with it? — To the folks who have already downloaded and opened your takeout files, is there text posts, comments or other stuff like commenter account...
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Commented on post by Michael Bruck in Google+ Mass MigrationOne advantage of G+ closing down is that you won't find your Google account and it's access to gmail et al suspended because of something you wrote on G+. Even if that post just happened to mention alcohol for instance without previously marking your account as for +18 only. Or for posting a picture of a model on the cat walk in Paris that was showing a bit of underboob. — Any alternative to G+ should take into account that censorship efforts have accelerated in the last two years under the pretext of weeding out 'Russian propaganda' or 'useful idiots' etc. A decentralized approach is much more urgent today than it was just a few years ago. From the article: "The clear implication is that censorship will not end with Google’s manipulation of its search platform or the removal of accounts by Facebook and Twitter. The ultimate aim is the total banning of oppositional news web sites. The publication of the PropOrNot blacklist and its promotion by the Washington Post helped trigger a wave of censorship measures against oppositional news sites by the major technology companies, working at the instigation of the US intelligence agencies and leading politicians."
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Commented on post by Peter Maranci in Google+ Mass Migration+Pat Kight If it's on a desktop, do you use Adblock (with Chrome)? — Please use the comment area of this post to talk about your experiences with Facebook (if you have any), and how it feels to use it in comparison with G+. I'm not looking for features or politics here. Thanks! #GooglePlusAlternativeReviews . #Facebook
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Danie van der Merwe When Google Buzz shut, the content just disappeared. We got a tool equivalent to Takeout but that was it. — Spare a thought for the developers. As well as the G+ UI, the API is going to sunset as well. All those buttons, badges, signin with G+, Share to G+, etc, etc are going to fail. They will have to be removed and/or replaced. If data doesn't come out of G+ via Google Takeout, then the only other option is to start writing code with the API. Except that the API has some major limitations that never really got addressed. Two big ones. - No API access to Communities - No API access to non-public data https://developers.google.com/+/web/
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Commented on post by Peter Maranci in Google+ Mass MigrationI use FB friends lists, page feeds, groups, events, chat every day. I almost never use the big stream. My main entry point is a bookmark of a carefully curated "close friends" list. I use adblock, some DNS control and Stylus to hide the bits I don't like. So I never see any ads. This is all through the desktop web interface. It works for me. — Please use the comment area of this post to talk about your experiences with Facebook (if you have any), and how it feels to use it in comparison with G+. I'm not looking for features or politics here. Thanks! #GooglePlusAlternativeReviews . #Facebook
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI'd suggest just taking over that community by posting to it. Except that having no friendly moderators is a worry. Is there a Facebook "G+ Migration / Exodus / Refugee" community? ;) — Is there a Reddit "G+ Migration / Exodus / Refugee" community? There is https://reddit.com/r/googleplus for general discussion, but it's not specifically about external migration and the mods aren't responding to queries. I thought I'd seen another but cannot find a reference. It didn't strike me as terribly useful. Should we create one as a secondary / offsite / out-of-band channel?
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Commented on post by Macdaddy Josh in Google+ Mass MigrationLooks like Facebook won and got all the names. There will be other niche players and sites providing niche function but FB is the big gorilla in the room. Interestingly, the one thing FB don't really do is micro-blogging. So they're not in direct competition with Twitter/Mastodon. Yet. With a bit of work on hiding adverts and some curation I find FB extremely useful. When G+ dies I probably won't actually migrate anywhere. I'll just use FB a bit more. And somewhat ironically, I've been unable to find an active G+ group or page on facebook. — I use facebook all the time
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Developing with Google++Remi F. Exactly. So what happens to all the G+ buttons, badges, embedded posts, API usage after they do? And in the short term, Takeout is incomplete for archiving and extraction all that G+ content. So it may require code and the API to get at some of it. Except that the API is incomplete as well. Any automated migration facility to another platform is going to have to use the API. And there's not much time. — The more I dig into this the more mind boggling I find the decision to sunset G+ - What happens to all those buttons, badges, embedded posts and signins for G+ on other websites? - How do you extract and archive content from within communities? - We now need APIs to extract and archive non-public data. And so on. Pretty much everything here is going to sunset as well. https://developers.google.com/+/web/
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Commented on post by Brian Holt Hawthorne in Google+ Mass MigrationThe one big thing we never worked out was sharing of lists of feeds, subscribing to other people's lists and even just viewing the composite feed for other people's lists. We've got a functioning standard in OPML but the only thing it's been used for really is migrating a subscription list from one feed reader to the next. OPML adoption and function needs work. - A convention for publishing a link to a person's OPML and getting people to actually do this. - Auto-discovery to match RSS auto-discovery - Viewing the "River of news" feed for a specific OPML file - Aggregating and Searching OPML lists - Easy permanent adding of an OPML to your feed list - Temporary subscription to an OPML list This is another layer on the stack. https://voidstar.com/opml.xml — Back before twitter introduced the concept of micro-blogging, we had actual blogs (web-logs). One of the most powerful parts of blogs was near-universal syndication using a few standards such as RSS. Then, along came walled gardens like Twitter and Google+, and suddenly you needed a separate app or web site for each. Google+ was compelling enough for me that I basically stopped reading blogs, except those linked to from Google+. Now that Google+ is going away, I am rethinking that decision. I’ve installed Feedly and I’m slowly adding all the blogs of people whom I used to just follow on Google+. Some of these are standalone Wordpress blogs. Some are journals on Dreamwidth. I’m sure I will find others. But however many people are moving to MeWe or pluspora or whatever, if it doesn’t support RSS syndication, I probably won’t be interacting with them much. I’ve downloaded apps for all those that have it, but I can’t see myself making the mistake of investing in any one self-enclosed site again. I am tired of walled gardens. I am tired of “social media” meaning a proprietary website. I am tired of seeing distributed problems solved and then those solutions destroyed by Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon. Before walled-gardens nearly killed blog syndication, we saw global standards like XMPP/Jabber that allowed universal chat through many services (AIM, iChat, Google Chat) with a single app destroyed by new proprietary systems and refusal to continue to use standards. So, MeWe is great, but without RSS support (which it will never have because of its privacy model), I won’t use it often. Pluspora (and diaspora) will consume RSS feeds, but unless I am missing something, it won’t generate RSS feeds. [ Update: +Edward Morbius points out you can follow a diaspora feed in Feedly https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/47cw3hzPmTv ] So, I am going back to reading blogs. I’ll probably resurrect one of my old blogs, or start a new one, and wash my hands of the whole walled-garden social media concept.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond+Per Siden The UN modelling in the 2017 revision only goes to 2100 and must be treated as pretty uncertain for >2050. But their medium fertility model still has +10m/yr in 2100. So no peak this century. Data collected is currently following the medium fertility model closely. And with 2050 only ~30 years away, the model should be fairly predictable out to there barring black swan events or some full on collapse. They kept pulling back the date for 10b but it's been stable for the last couple of revisions. So 10b in 2050-2060 seems very likely. — Paul Ehrlich - The Population Bomb By a spooky coincidence, Paul Ehrlich published The Population Bomb in 1968 in the same year that population growth rate peaked at 2.09%/yr. The global population that year was 3.55b. If that growth rate had been maintained ever since then we would have passed through 10b this year. So we're really lucky that 1968 was also pretty much when we transitioned from exponential growth to linear growth and hitting 10b is still 38 years away. It's easy to see now in retrospect that the demographic transition happened and come up with all kinds of reasons why it happened. It's harder to come up with reasons as to why Ehrlich should have seen it then. He was writing in a time when we'd had a 100 years or so of exponential growth over 1.5%/yr and in the previous 20 years it had been accelerating. So I think he deserves a break for being overly pessimistic back then. 10b, right now, and having got there so fast, would not be pretty. I don't think its going to be pretty in 2056 either, but we have a little more time to adjust. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Population_Bomb http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/#growthrate
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationFollowing a single person in Atom is handy. But what about feeds for a single community or for a person's home stream. Reddit does some of that. There was a brief spell of 5 years or so when every new system added feeds for everything. Now we're in the time of snowflake APIs (all different) or no feeds at all because "Who uses them?" and we've only just got the minimum Viable Product out the door. — Yes, Diaspora has Atom feeds (like RSS) Tag ".atom" to the end of the username, as in: https://joindiaspora.com/public/dredmorbius.atom
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass Migration+Brian Holt Hawthorne Mastodon atom feed titles. I requested more expressive titles, but the developer community said no and closed the issue. https://github.com/tootsuite/mastodon/issues/1438 So it was re-opened in a follow up. https://github.com/tootsuite/mastodon/issues/8125 — Yes, Diaspora has Atom feeds (like RSS) Tag ".atom" to the end of the username, as in: https://joindiaspora.com/public/dredmorbius.atom
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Commented on post by Brian Holt Hawthorne in Google+ Mass MigrationEvery blog has some sort of commenting system Except where the owner can't be bothered any more to deal with the spam and moderation. Or where integration with Disqus proved too hard. And part of the problem is keeping track of, and getting notifications from, all the places you've left a comment. — Back before twitter introduced the concept of micro-blogging, we had actual blogs (web-logs). One of the most powerful parts of blogs was near-universal syndication using a few standards such as RSS. Then, along came walled gardens like Twitter and Google+, and suddenly you needed a separate app or web site for each. Google+ was compelling enough for me that I basically stopped reading blogs, except those linked to from Google+. Now that Google+ is going away, I am rethinking that decision. I’ve installed Feedly and I’m slowly adding all the blogs of people whom I used to just follow on Google+. Some of these are standalone Wordpress blogs. Some are journals on Dreamwidth. I’m sure I will find others. But however many people are moving to MeWe or pluspora or whatever, if it doesn’t support RSS syndication, I probably won’t be interacting with them much. I’ve downloaded apps for all those that have it, but I can’t see myself making the mistake of investing in any one self-enclosed site again. I am tired of walled gardens. I am tired of “social media” meaning a proprietary website. I am tired of seeing distributed problems solved and then those solutions destroyed by Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon. Before walled-gardens nearly killed blog syndication, we saw global standards like XMPP/Jabber that allowed universal chat through many services (AIM, iChat, Google Chat) with a single app destroyed by new proprietary systems and refusal to continue to use standards. So, MeWe is great, but without RSS support (which it will never have because of its privacy model), I won’t use it often. Pluspora (and diaspora) will consume RSS feeds, but unless I am missing something, it won’t generate RSS feeds. [ Update: +Edward Morbius points out you can follow a diaspora feed in Feedly https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/47cw3hzPmTv ] So, I am going back to reading blogs. I’ll probably resurrect one of my old blogs, or start a new one, and wash my hands of the whole walled-garden social media concept.
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Commented on post by Julian BondAn incomplete list of discontinued Google products. http://uk.businessinsider.com/discontinued-google-products-2016-8 — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay - Feedreader https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't. Originally posted at https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23/posts/3wo7UBq8Si6 Apologies to +John Lewis
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationI have no idea how to go about archiving a community, let alone migrating it. +Edward Morbius Didn't we go through this with Miranda's Knitting and Tea House? ISTR attempts to extract the existing post and comment streams and copy them across to reddit that basically failed. — Action Item: Members, Moderators, and Owners of Google+ Communities Through several recent conversations, I’m realising that G+ Communities need to both migrate their users and the community itself, ranging from small groups to 400,000+ member, 2,000-3,3000 monthly post groups. I think some tools for that are missing – there’s no "export Community” button, for example – and there’s a lot of confusion over what to do, when, or how. The Google+ Mass Migration Community (2,300 members since 8 October) is the largest I know of on Google+ itself dealing with this problem, and we’re collecting and organising information on contacts, practices, possible destinations, Google tools, and more. With the voice and members of larger communities, the whole G+ Mass Migration effort has more sway. We’re 2,300 voices now, it would be Really Nice to say “hi, we’re representing about 50,000 (or 500,000, or 5 million) Google+ users, we’re looking for a new home, and we’d like to talk Features and Stuff We Care About with you”. There is power in numbers and unity, that’s an attractive pull to possible destinations, and can make things happen, especially representing multiple engaged and cohesive groups. Would you be interested in getting the word out about Google+ Mass Migration: https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 If you’re a mod or owner, engage with your members, if you’re a member, recruit your moderator(s) and community owners. And the #PlexodusWiki , which has been getting populated with information detailing goals, plans, schedules, data migration, and potential target platforms. It is agnostic to destination, and doesn’t pretend to speak for all Google+ users and groups, but to help each in their own process of moving communities forward. See: Goals: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Goals *How to Plan an Exodus: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/How_to_plan_an_exodus Exodus Planning and Scheduling: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Exodus_Planning_and_Scheduling Data Migration Process and Considerations: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Data_Migration_Process_and_Considerations Thank you. The text of this post should be a good template or copy or adapt for posting to your communities.
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Commented on post by Edward Morbius in Google+ Mass MigrationThe Guardian is on Diaspora via friendica. https://diasp.org/people/174591b4195831ac97e7116945967380 Those news feeds though are really like Pages in facebook, or bot driven users that auto-cross post, not communities/groups. — Action Item: Members, Moderators, and Owners of Google+ Communities Through several recent conversations, I’m realising that G+ Communities need to both migrate their users and the community itself, ranging from small groups to 400,000+ member, 2,000-3,3000 monthly post groups. I think some tools for that are missing – there’s no "export Community” button, for example – and there’s a lot of confusion over what to do, when, or how. The Google+ Mass Migration Community (2,300 members since 8 October) is the largest I know of on Google+ itself dealing with this problem, and we’re collecting and organising information on contacts, practices, possible destinations, Google tools, and more. With the voice and members of larger communities, the whole G+ Mass Migration effort has more sway. We’re 2,300 voices now, it would be Really Nice to say “hi, we’re representing about 50,000 (or 500,000, or 5 million) Google+ users, we’re looking for a new home, and we’d like to talk Features and Stuff We Care About with you”. There is power in numbers and unity, that’s an attractive pull to possible destinations, and can make things happen, especially representing multiple engaged and cohesive groups. Would you be interested in getting the word out about Google+ Mass Migration: https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772 If you’re a mod or owner, engage with your members, if you’re a member, recruit your moderator(s) and community owners. And the #PlexodusWiki , which has been getting populated with information detailing goals, plans, schedules, data migration, and potential target platforms. It is agnostic to destination, and doesn’t pretend to speak for all Google+ users and groups, but to help each in their own process of moving communities forward. See: Goals: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Goals *How to Plan an Exodus: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/How_to_plan_an_exodus Exodus Planning and Scheduling: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Exodus_Planning_and_Scheduling Data Migration Process and Considerations: https://social.antefriguserat.de/index.php/Data_Migration_Process_and_Considerations Thank you. The text of this post should be a good template or copy or adapt for posting to your communities.
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Commented on post by Brian Holt Hawthorne in Google+ Mass MigrationMastodon has Atom-Out. Needs some work though as the title of every item in a feed is the same. AFAIK, though this is just for a single user's posts, not for a user's home feed. — Back before twitter introduced the concept of micro-blogging, we had actual blogs (web-logs). One of the most powerful parts of blogs was near-universal syndication using a few standards such as RSS. Then, along came walled gardens like Twitter and Google+, and suddenly you needed a separate app or web site for each. Google+ was compelling enough for me that I basically stopped reading blogs, except those linked to from Google+. Now that Google+ is going away, I am rethinking that decision. I’ve installed Feedly and I’m slowly adding all the blogs of people whom I used to just follow on Google+. Some of these are standalone Wordpress blogs. Some are journals on Dreamwidth. I’m sure I will find others. But however many people are moving to MeWe or pluspora or whatever, if it doesn’t support RSS syndication, I probably won’t be interacting with them much. I’ve downloaded apps for all those that have it, but I can’t see myself making the mistake of investing in any one self-enclosed site again. I am tired of walled gardens. I am tired of “social media” meaning a proprietary website. I am tired of seeing distributed problems solved and then those solutions destroyed by Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon. Before walled-gardens nearly killed blog syndication, we saw global standards like XMPP/Jabber that allowed universal chat through many services (AIM, iChat, Google Chat) with a single app destroyed by new proprietary systems and refusal to continue to use standards. So, MeWe is great, but without RSS support (which it will never have because of its privacy model), I won’t use it often. Pluspora (and diaspora) will consume RSS feeds, but unless I am missing something, it won’t generate RSS feeds. [ Update: +Edward Morbius points out you can follow a diaspora feed in Feedly https://plus.google.com/104092656004159577193/posts/47cw3hzPmTv ] So, I am going back to reading blogs. I’ll probably resurrect one of my old blogs, or start a new one, and wash my hands of the whole walled-garden social media concept.
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Commented on post by Brad Borland in Google+ Mass MigrationThis reminded me that Google once had a Blog-Specific search engine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Blog_Search Long since discontinued. — Okay, this is a weird idea, but here it goes. What about jumping in blogger and using rss feeds? Blogger is pretty well networked and is searchable within itself. Just join in, post and comment.... Sort of a network of blogs where each one is like a profile. (Just a thought) : )
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Commented on post by Brad Borland in Google+ Mass Migration+John Lewis For specific communities of interest, we've been doing that for quite some time with products like phpBB, vBulletin, Drupal. As you say, the catch is scale. And doing the second and subsequent communities of interest. In a previous life, I built quite a substantial social network on top of Drupal V3 with a load of custom code. No longer with us, sadly. And I wouldn't want to do that again. — Okay, this is a weird idea, but here it goes. What about jumping in blogger and using rss feeds? Blogger is pretty well networked and is searchable within itself. Just join in, post and comment.... Sort of a network of blogs where each one is like a profile. (Just a thought) : )
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationFeel free to continue the discussion here. https://plus.google.com/+JulianBond23/posts/EhcAN1vQdCQ — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't.
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Commented on post by Brad Borland in Google+ Mass Migrationhttp://Wordpress.com as an alternative to http://Blogger.com ? I put some effort into creating an RSS feed of my G+ posts and then using that to auto-post into my blog platform. So at least I have an archive without needing to use takeout. After all these years, I still don't think we've got a good solution to blog comments. — Okay, this is a weird idea, but here it goes. What about jumping in blogger and using rss feeds? Blogger is pretty well networked and is searchable within itself. Just join in, post and comment.... Sort of a network of blogs where each one is like a profile. (Just a thought) : )
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+John Phillips Not a problem I've run into yet. I guess I'm just lucky. Seriously though, that language is a little excessive, no? — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+John Phillips Security and Privacy? If that's really important to you, then don't join and post on a big social network. — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Dima Pasechnik AdBlock, plus some DNS blocks and a little Stylus and I never, never see any ads on Facebook. I curate a small list of friends and then bookmark that feed. So I never see the big feed. If the "close friends" annoy me in any way (eg by clicking on bullshit). They first get removed from the "Close friends" list. If they keep doing it, they get unfriended and blocked. Problem? What problem? — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+John Phillips Facebook Posts, Groups, Messenger Chat, the Pages feed, Events, Friends lists. I use all these every day. They work. I'm not sure what it is people hate about it so much. Part of the problem here is that there aren't many social network systems of the scale and functionality of G+. FB is undoubtedly the leader. There are others that replicate * some * of the functionality. — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass Migration+Dima Pasechnik The danger, and likelihood, is that the free version disappears. So you won't be able to upload your 50k tracks or your 1k track playlists unless you take out the subscription. Then they'll notice that nobody is paying the £10pm. — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't.
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Commented on post by Matthew FongIf you want a vision of the future, imagine a pair of Vans Classics stamping on a human face - forever. — So when does Google++ come out?
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Commented on post by Matthew FongG++ is the one where we throw objects at them. Not by reference but by value. And before they invoke the inherited destructor. Google seem to be following the alchemist's instruction, "Invoke often". But also Lovecraft's dictum. “Do not call up that which you cannot put down.” — So when does Google++ come out?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationClose to real time Chat is just one major feature. I've been following GChat since the old days of XMPP support and when their major competition was Skype, MSN, ICQ, AIM and so on. For a brief moment, Google looked like it might unite an open source federation around XMPP. But no. And now I can no longer keep up with all the different and incompatible Google Chat systems. So my go to these days is Facebook chat. Because FB chat just works and people respond to it. — Google is proving itself to be an unreliable and untrustworthy partner. We're being chucked off G+ as it closes down. So which other Google properties should we leave now and stop investing time and effort into? Because we don't know when Google will decide to just close them down. Here's a short list of Google Products that feel to me like they might be at risk. - Music - Photos - Drive - Blogger - Calendar - News - GoogleGroups - Hangouts - Chromecast Audio - Wear OS - Android Auto - Google Pay https://www.google.co.uk/intl/en/about/products/ And that's just the consumer stuff. Want to invest time in Google APIs to build into products? Don't.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Gerhard Torges lol! — This just in: EU ambassadors being debriefed by Michel Barnier, the bloc’s chief negotiator, have been told that there is no deal, and that there are serious remaining issues over the Irish border question. The meeting in Brussels is ongoing. The Brexit secretary, Dominic Raab, was with Barnier for just over an hour before the briefing. One senior EU diplomat said that the British did not believe they had enough on the temporary nature of the customs union aspect of the backstop to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland. The UK wants it to be time-limited, but Brussels is resisting. “Raab had come here for a concession”, the diplomat said. “They don’t have enough.” The source did not dissuade me from the view that much of this is political theatre designed to help the prime minister sell the backstop at a later date back home. However a meeting of the leaders’ ‘sherpas’, the officials who are the most senior heads of state and government, that was due to take place on Monday afternoon to sign off on any deal, has now been cancelled. That is ominous.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ Mass MigrationAs you know, Google's Help, Support and Press communities are all over the place. There's GoogleGroups, Productforums, G+ Profiles, G+ Communities, blogs on Blogger, Help&Support FAQs and on and on. At some stage, probably in the Gundrota era, a lot of Google product teams were encouraged to create G+ communities to do customer relationship and support work. Some of these are still running and active. In theory, all that content and community outreach should be migrated somewhere else as part of the G+ sunset. In practice, we know Google will simply shutter them. And the people tasked with running them will just get re-assigned. Took me a while to find that Press page, listing all the customer and press relationship sites. Expect it to just disappear as well. https://www.google.com/press/blog-social-directory.html — I wonder what tools Google is providing internally to help their teams migrate the official Google Communities on G+ https://www.google.com/press/blog-social-directory.html eg https://plus.google.com/+Blogger or https://plus.google.com/+google
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Commented on post by Todd William in Google+ UpdatesThere's Google Takeout Use JSON Extracting your comments, especially from communities, may be difficult. see https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/112164273001338979772 — Is Google intending to offer any solutions to export our content? I've put a lot of effort into cultivating my content for multiple collections and I'm hoping I don't have to back up each post individually to preserve them.
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Commented on post by Jeffry Johnston in Google+ Mass MigrationJust ignore it. The culture is what the users make it. And you're a user. IMHO. CW is appropriate in a very few cases. eg NSFW and spoilers or joke reveals. In all other cases, the correct response to something somebody feels should be behind CW is for them to unfollow you or block you. — I've been looking into Mastodon, but the culture there is quite puzzling. A majority of posts and images are hidden behind content warnings. I opened a bunch of them and wasn't sure why they were even hidden. My first impression is that Mastodon seems to be a Twitter-style version of Tumblr for snowflakes that need trigger warnings on everything. It makes me afraid to post because someone might take offense. Am I missing the point?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIndefinite BRINO. A key issue is if it can be made vague and innocuous enough for Labour to whip their MPs to vote for it. — Looks like May has a plan: the UK would stay in a customs union, likely to be described as a customs arrangement by the prime minister, on an indefinite basis. However, the British government would be able to point to criteria under which the arrangement would be terminated, fulfilling the British desire for it to appear to be a temporary arrangement. Now she just has to convince the hardliners in the Tory party.
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Commented on post by Lauren WeinsteinI went back and looked at GoogleGroups. And was astonished at just how bad search was. I'm also concerned that the early archives of usenet via dejanews have pretty much disappeared now. — Of course there is another approach entirely to keeping in touch in the absence of G+ -- yep, Google Groups.
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Commented on post by Martha Magenta in Google+ Mass Migration+Martha Magenta And for the real old school. Usenet. — When you announce alternatives to G+ it would be helpful if you said whether we can create communities there Many of us are looking for sites where we can migrate our communities, not just individuals doing our own thing and posting stuff on a stream. Thank you.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeWe could do with one of these https://bridge.joinmastodon.org/ but for G+ to diaspora — 'We are shutting down Google+ for consumers.' We will implement this wind-down over a 10-month period, slated for completion by the end of next August. Well, its not actually a surprise, isn't it? So, any suggestions where to go? I have reddit and mastodon on my list. Anything else? (If you mention Twitter you risk to get blocked. I won't grace this cesspit with my presence.)
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Commented on post by Andreas SchouAssume good intent. At least to start with. Own your own words. If other people fail to understand them, that may be your fault. — On Moderation: An Ass-Backward Guide to Managing a Community Which Extends From Revolutionary Socialists to Anarcho-Capitalists (1) When responding as editor, always assume that you are talking to a reasonable person making the most reasonable possible version of their argument. This is not always true in the real world, but this sort of bad-faith good-faith heads off any risk of escalating, tit-for-tat misinterpretation of the other person's argument. (2) A new member of the community, especially a dissenting member, will often appear to be a troll. Dissenting members who have been socialized to dissent helpfully eventually become valuable members of the community. (3) Use soft power until you have reached its limits. If the community has a disruptive member who disagrees with you, see if you can get someone who agrees with the disruptive person to intervene on your behalf. It will seem less like you're punishing dissent. (4) There is no reason to be rude or cruel to someone whom you will not have a continuing relationship with. If you need to exercise hard power -- banning, reporting, excluding -- decide that that's what you need to do, do it, and don't comment on the subject. (5) Try to be epistemically multilingual. If you can explain a position using only assumptions that you and the other person share, don't try to force a new set of assumptions down their throat. More than likely, they'll just reject your position outright, and you will no longer have anything interesting to talk about. (6) The most difficult problem an ideological diverse community faces is not antisocial disagreement, but antisocial agreement. It is difficult to convince people that any such thing exists, but community punishment of people who operate outside the editorial consensus can stifle dissent and cause the community to go wildly awry. (7) Hard apriorists are not a useful part of most conversations. If someone believes he can determine the appropriate federal funds rate from I Think, Therefore I Am, you will probably not have a productive conversation with him, and it is best to politely tell him that he is being ignored. (8) Biographical details are important. They are anecdotal, but not peripheral. If someone believes they have insights into their own region, ethnicity, profession, gender, government, family, or life experiences, this is likely to be true. What's more, people demand more respect for their own lived experiences than for beliefs which they hold for other reasons. It is fair to demand that people tread carefully around biographical details and lived experience. (9) People overgeneralize from their own biographies. Anecdotal experience derived from lived experience is important. It is, however, still anecdotal. If you are inclined to make a strident point based on a biographical argument, it would help if you also went and found some data to support it rather than simply demanding concession from the person you're arguing with. If you see someone genuinely trying to make a fair argument against your biographical details and lived experience, try to assume that it was made in good faith.  (10) If you find yourself looking at a Wikipedia page to construct an argument against someone whom you believe to be better-informed on a subject than you, stop. At best, you are denying yourself the opportunity to learn something from a subject matter expert -- even one who turns out to be wrong. At worst, you are about to embarrass yourself.  (11) Argument about rules of evidence, especially in the middle of another argument,  is seldom productive. If you are aware of the rules of evidence generally adhered to by the people you're arguing with, try to produce evidence which at least meets that standard, and table the argument about evidentiary rules until it can be addressed separately. (Note: If you have seen this before, and you are seeing it again now, it's because I've pinned the rules for my space to the top of my profile.)
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Commented on post by Andreas SchouThere certainly are a lot of decorative motherfucking gourds around just now. And the leaves have only just begun to turn and fall. And I miss you most of all, my darling When decorative gourds begin to appear. — It's "it's decorative gourd season, motherfuckers" season, motherfuckers. https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/its-decorative-gourd-season-motherfuckers
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Commented on post by John Hattan in Google+ Mass MigrationWhen G+ disappears, will your Google Profile disappear as well? Because the profile is common to other Google properties. And it used to be possible to add links to other social networks. However. I'd strongly recommend having a personal domain with a personal website, that contains a roll of all your social media profile pages each with some semantic web markup in the form of rel='me' on each link. I call it a YASN-Roll. (Yet Another Social Network). — Public Service Announcement : If you are leaving G+ for good, please make your very last post a list of places where we can find you (Pluspora, Twitter, etc). That way, those of us who are trying to maintain communication with our old G+ friends will will know where to find/follow/aspect you.
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattWe need a name for whatever it is that Google is about to do. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKu7TYWNxqA — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattOn the plus side, you're less likely to get your main google profile banned, blocked or removed from Google because of something you posted on G+ — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Martha Magenta in Google+ Mass MigrationYes, Communities are a key and very important function. Yes. Facebook Groups work pretty well. Two other possible alternatives. With their own problems. - GoogleGroups - Yahoogroups re Googlegroups. Try and find a group on there talking about Google+. It's hard !!! — When you announce alternatives to G+ it would be helpful if you said whether we can create communities there Many of us are looking for sites where we can migrate our communities, not just individuals doing our own thing and posting stuff on a stream. Thank you.
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt+Gideon Rosenblatt Ah yes. Google Groups - The archive of the early years of usenet. — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattThere should be a sweep on which product is next for the hammer. Photos? Music? — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattWhere are you now +Vic Gundotra, +Dave Besbris +Bradley Horowitz and also +Joseph Smarr ? I don't even know who's currently in charge and wikipedia doesn't seem to either. — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeTo those arguing against Facebook, I'd suggest you're using it wrong. It doesn't have to be unpleasant. Used right, it has a lot going for it. Twitter is horrible. I wish it would just die. Mastodon is ok and improving, as far as it goes. But the discussions are still ephemeral. What I actually want is somewhere for medium to long form posts with medium to long form comments. Private blogs with rss feeds are all very well, but we still don't have a good way of aggregating them and their comments. And even with things like Disqus and akamai, moderating comments on your own blog is a nightmare. — 'We are shutting down Google+ for consumers.' We will implement this wind-down over a 10-month period, slated for completion by the end of next August. Well, its not actually a surprise, isn't it? So, any suggestions where to go? I have reddit and mastodon on my list. Anything else? (If you mention Twitter you risk to get blocked. I won't grace this cesspit with my presence.)
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatthttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vic_Gundotra where are you now? — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattI liked Buzz and put quite a bit of effort into it. I was very disappointed when Buzz was shut and migrated to G+ And in the process a bunch of useful function was lost. I then put quite a bit of effort into recreating Atom/RSS feeds for G+ using the G+ API. And building links to auto-crosspost from G+ to other platforms. Like tears in the rain, etc. Google screwed me over 3 times with Orkut. I was an early adopter and created some groups. Then Google came in and absorbed the login process. Then I discovered my old ID had gone and somebody else had taken over the groups. Then Google canned the whole project. I was never a user of Reader, except to try it out. But I am an early and heavy user of Atom/RSS. Destroying Reader effectively destroyed the Atom/RSS market as a mass user system. It still runs and people still use it, but increasingly signal sources don't see RSS feeds as a necessary part of a startup. So what's left? When do Drive, Photos, Gmail, Calendar, Music just get canned because G doesn't want to do them any more? And perhaps more importantly what happens when G destroys a dominant incumbent by coming into a market, and then later leaves that market? That's not just G but a whole market sector that gets damaged in the process. — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattI'm going to make a case for Facebook. 1) Create a list or two of close friends. 2) Bookmark the feed for this list and make it your entry point to Facebook. 3) Use a browser with lots of ad blocking. And use Stylus (or similar) to remove bits of facebook and fb sidebars you don't like. 4) Like and follow pages. Then view the pages/feed 5) join and contribute to groups 6) Set permissions so in general you post to your friends list and only accept comments and messenger from friends. 7) Like all social media, block early and block often. You've now got 3 functions in Friends, pages, groups which allow meaningful communication signal but reject all the noise. Do all that and facebook is a very useful tool. Facebook too, will pass. — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Gideon RosenblattPerhaps they could restart Buzz and Orkut. — And the main lesson for those end-users, like us, who have invested thousands of hours helping to build services like Google+ and Google Reader? Never invest deeply in a platform that isn't the primary focus of the company behind it. #GooglePlus #Google
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Commented on post by Julie Wills in Google+ UpdatesI heard they were going to restart Buzz and Orkut. Not. — So long, and thanks for all the fish 😢
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Dima Pasechnik Not sure I get that. The city in Czech Republic? And "JC's handlers": What, you mean Momentum? — So Theresa May has run the numbers during the Tory conference, and with the troglodytes around Mogg torpedoing any deal, she has noticed that she can win the final vote on whatever the EU offers only with the help of Labour. That would be the Labour party whose explicit strategy it is to make sure that May loses that vote, in order to trigger an election. And so she is reaching out to selected Labour MPs. I suppose mainly those from Leave voting constituencies. I bet Team Corbyn is super happy. I think the success of this strategy depends on four things: 1) How much she caves in and erases her silly red lines, so that the EU can throw her something. Do I smell a customs union in the morning? 2) How nice the EU wants to be. 3) How hard the Labour whips whip. 4) What those Labour MPs make out of all this, under all this pressure.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Joerg Fliege Are Labour edging towards officially aiming for BRINO? (Brexit In Name Only). — So Theresa May has run the numbers during the Tory conference, and with the troglodytes around Mogg torpedoing any deal, she has noticed that she can win the final vote on whatever the EU offers only with the help of Labour. That would be the Labour party whose explicit strategy it is to make sure that May loses that vote, in order to trigger an election. And so she is reaching out to selected Labour MPs. I suppose mainly those from Leave voting constituencies. I bet Team Corbyn is super happy. I think the success of this strategy depends on four things: 1) How much she caves in and erases her silly red lines, so that the EU can throw her something. Do I smell a customs union in the morning? 2) How nice the EU wants to be. 3) How hard the Labour whips whip. 4) What those Labour MPs make out of all this, under all this pressure.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThis sounds remarkably like the Galileo defence from AGW-Deniers as to why the 97% are wrong. — "Mr Tusk says it won't work, but that's what people said about the light bulb in 1878." There you go, folks. Brexit against physics. I know where my money is.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitOk. So who picked all the cherries off the Tories Secret Plan cakes? — And now on to actual Tory politics, which consists of promising everything to everyone, including mutually exclusive things. This didn't start with Brexit: right now, as before, they are promising to widen home ownership. (To get more votes from young renters.) Right now, as before, they promise to keep house prices up. (To keep votes from house owners.) In practice, these two policies are mutually exclusive.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitUKExit means U Keks It — Notes from the 'Brexit means Brexit' event, not part of the official Tory party meeting, but just next door. If you know what I mean. Priti Patel is running through a list of European treaties, and invites the audience to boo at each of them. Andrea Jenkyns says Remainers are "talking the country down." An audience member shouts: "Traitors!" Nuremberg in the Midlands.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Engrumpled Curmudgeon ME262. Baby, don't fear the reaper. Cities in flames (with rock and roll). On your feet or on your knees. Here they are. The amazing. Blue Öyster Cult! — Brexit is a comedy singularity. Blockchain May Resolve Irish Border Brexit Problem: Hammond A solution to providing frictionless trade across the Irish border after Britain leaves the European Union might be found using technology such as Blockchain, finance minister Phillip Hammond said on Monday. "There is technology becoming available (...) I don't claim to be an expert on it but the most obvious technology is blockchain," Hammond said when asked about how the government could achieve smooth trade after Brexit. And thats a wrap. The EU will be a cloud based solution, with a firewall from China. The Euro will be replaced by Bitcoin, and we chain May to a block and drop her into the Irish sea.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI, for one, am vigorously indifferent. — Brexit and the Anglican vote. It appears that 66% of all Anglicans who voted in the referendum voted for Leave. That is significantly more than the average in England (53%). Anglicans are more enthusiastically pro-Brexit than affiliates of other major religions. In England, 55% of Catholics voted Leave, 45% Remain. Amongst other non-Christian faiths – though sample sizes are small – the tendency was to favour Remain over Leave. The increasingly large group who report ‘no religion’ also favoured Remain: 53% Remain, 47% Leave. The effect stays after correcting for other demographic factors like age etc. Anglicans are generally centre-right in politics but liberal on matters of personal morality. Newspapers like the Telegraph or Daily Mail reflect their views. They take a generally negative view of the EU, with a quarter saying they can see no benefit at all in being a member. What they object to most are ‘EU rules and regulations’, followed by weak borders and unchecked immigration, and taking power from Parliament. Over half object to every one of these things. After that come economic objections. In other words, most Anglicans take a positive view of English culture and ethnicity, and regard the EU as a threat to their heritage, values, identity and parliamentary sovereignty. These concerns, which are sometimes lumped together as ‘nativist’ are greater even than their economic ones.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitPlease note, especially Americans:- Most of Europe is now >50% A-Religious. We're not Atheists. We just have zero interest in religion at all, at all. — Brexit and the Anglican vote. It appears that 66% of all Anglicans who voted in the referendum voted for Leave. That is significantly more than the average in England (53%). Anglicans are more enthusiastically pro-Brexit than affiliates of other major religions. In England, 55% of Catholics voted Leave, 45% Remain. Amongst other non-Christian faiths – though sample sizes are small – the tendency was to favour Remain over Leave. The increasingly large group who report ‘no religion’ also favoured Remain: 53% Remain, 47% Leave. The effect stays after correcting for other demographic factors like age etc. Anglicans are generally centre-right in politics but liberal on matters of personal morality. Newspapers like the Telegraph or Daily Mail reflect their views. They take a generally negative view of the EU, with a quarter saying they can see no benefit at all in being a member. What they object to most are ‘EU rules and regulations’, followed by weak borders and unchecked immigration, and taking power from Parliament. Over half object to every one of these things. After that come economic objections. In other words, most Anglicans take a positive view of English culture and ethnicity, and regard the EU as a threat to their heritage, values, identity and parliamentary sovereignty. These concerns, which are sometimes lumped together as ‘nativist’ are greater even than their economic ones.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademiahttps://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reimagining-of-schroedingers-cat-breaks-quantum-mechanics-mdash-and-stumps-physicists1/ Which depends on two boxes, two of Wigner's friends in them (Bob & Alice) and a secure quantum cryptography channel between them. Timetabling is worse than that. It's an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game involving multiple boxes, multiple experimenters, a herd of cats, incomplete communications and a random number generator. — The highlight of the week has been the Timetabling department's decision to turn next week's lectures into an exciting form of scavenger hunt – due to a series of unfortunate events involving faculty laxness, personnel turnover and a magnificent new piece of software, I have no idea where my classes might be occurring. I like it. It adds a frisson of unknowability to an already stressful week which keeps the cardio-vascular system going. I can relate. Around here, certain computer labs that are supposed to start early next week are in a state of quantum superposition, with students and lab hours drifting in and out of existence. Ah, the joy of having not enough lab seats. Or too many students, if thats how you want to phrase it. Soon, the wave function will collapse.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThere's a very large number of people in the UK who state "Anglican" as a tribal membership but are essentially A-Religious. That's true also of most of the other major religions. There's also an increasingly large number of people who identify (if asked) as A-Religious. They're more likely to be young but not exclusively. So using that as a split and trying to relate it to political feelings is risky, since what you're really comparing is tribal memberships and backgrounds with a strong correlation with age. We already know that the young voted remain, and people who feel strongly "British" (and likely to call themselves Anglican) voted Leave. 2 years on, all this stuff is moot though. It's more important how people feel now than how they voted then. — Brexit and the Anglican vote. It appears that 66% of all Anglicans who voted in the referendum voted for Leave. That is significantly more than the average in England (53%). Anglicans are more enthusiastically pro-Brexit than affiliates of other major religions. In England, 55% of Catholics voted Leave, 45% Remain. Amongst other non-Christian faiths – though sample sizes are small – the tendency was to favour Remain over Leave. The increasingly large group who report ‘no religion’ also favoured Remain: 53% Remain, 47% Leave. The effect stays after correcting for other demographic factors like age etc. Anglicans are generally centre-right in politics but liberal on matters of personal morality. Newspapers like the Telegraph or Daily Mail reflect their views. They take a generally negative view of the EU, with a quarter saying they can see no benefit at all in being a member. What they object to most are ‘EU rules and regulations’, followed by weak borders and unchecked immigration, and taking power from Parliament. Over half object to every one of these things. After that come economic objections. In other words, most Anglicans take a positive view of English culture and ethnicity, and regard the EU as a threat to their heritage, values, identity and parliamentary sovereignty. These concerns, which are sometimes lumped together as ‘nativist’ are greater even than their economic ones.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitLink to the poll for Facebonkers. https://www.facebook.com/NFarageHero/posts/2202705069947730 — Someone is trolling Nigel on Facebook. Its the will of the people
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Commented on post by Allen DowneyWas this the offending cross post? — Here's a Bayesian puzzle to start your day.
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Commented on post by Julian BondIn another instalment of festival memories, I did a post on a Stonehenge group on facebook. It was asking about which fields the various 70s Stonehenge festivals actually occupied. It seems that we all disagree and the Uk Free Festivals site has at least 3 diagrams which are all different. That led to a conversation about Caesar's Camp '78. Another commentor said he'd been there as well. Then that he'd run the free food kitchen. Then that I'd helped peeling spuds on the Bank Holiday Monday. So we must have sat next to each other. — 42 years ago, I received this hand painted invitation to a free festival in the ruined gardens of Rivington Pike near Chorley in Lancashire. I knew I still had it but it had gone missing and I'd been searching for it for 15 years at least. Yesterday it fell out of a bunch of old papers and yellowed copies of International Times. http://internationaltimes.it/ There's a detailed write up here of the adventures we and others had. http://www.ukrockfestivals.com/rivington-pike-78.html There's a postscript as well. Here And Now liked my write up so much, they asked me to do the liner notes for one of their Live CDs of their set at the festival. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_%26_Now_%28band%29
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt's the Long, Dark, Tea-Cake of the Soul. — Another brilliant analysis. Leaving aside the few who live on the wilder shores of Brexit, the vast majority of the UK political, academic, media and think-tank class do not really want to leave the EU, even those who say loudly how much the result of the 2016 referendum must be honoured. What they really want is to be able to remain in the EU but, like Joey Zasa [from The Godfather III], to be treated with the “respect” to which they think the UK is entitled. I call this “cakeism in the soul”, CIS for short. Those suffering from CIS want to be in the EU but on terms that suit the UK, because the UK is special and different. There is another variant of CIS: Red Mist CIS (RM-CIS). This is largely found among those on the left. You recognise that they are suffering from it when you hear the words “jobs-first-Brexit”. Those suffering from RM-CIS believe that the lack of progress in the Brexit negotiations is all the fault of Tory ineptitude. If only Labour were in charge of the negotiations, they reason, the EU would be much more accommodating.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Joseph Moosman Ni! — Jacob Rees-Mogg writes for the Daily Mail. An interesting treatise. Boadicea would have been impressed by Theresa May as she spoke from a room festooned with Union flags in Downing Street on Friday. The strains of Rule Britannia could have been playing in the background because her words made it clear that Britons never shall be slaves. I have not made this up. He really wrote this.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt's becoming impossible to vote for the 2 major parties. Which leaves 80% of the people disenfranchised. If only the SNP fielded candidates throughout the UK. — Officials in Brussels had been briefed by Whitehall to find a solution to the Irish border in a way “that it is not applicable for Scotland.” Hahahaha. They can't do their job, so they are asking the EU to do it for them. They have completely forgotten about the Irish issue, and now they have to come up with something that does not allow any Scottish gambit. Because of the Union, the sacrosanct, holy Union. Because no country can ever be divided. (Except Ireland. And Cyprus. And Germany. And Korea. But I digress.) Bunch of amateurs.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexithttps://www.libdemvoice.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Screen-Shot-2017-09-13-at-20.06.09-300x283.png — Jacob Rees-Mogg writes for the Daily Mail. An interesting treatise. Boadicea would have been impressed by Theresa May as she spoke from a room festooned with Union flags in Downing Street on Friday. The strains of Rule Britannia could have been playing in the background because her words made it clear that Britons never shall be slaves. I have not made this up. He really wrote this.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitNever mind will power, I think she needs a chariot with rotating knives. And a hoard of MPs behind her dressed only in woad. Where's Arthur and Merlin when we need them? And the Green Man. And men in tights. They will rise again in our hour of greatest need. ps. There's lots of wonderful Britannia images on DeviantArt but not entirely suitable. except perhaps this one. https://www.libdemvoice.org/cheer-up-britannia-brexit-is-coming-55259.html — Jacob Rees-Mogg writes for the Daily Mail. An interesting treatise. Boadicea would have been impressed by Theresa May as she spoke from a room festooned with Union flags in Downing Street on Friday. The strains of Rule Britannia could have been playing in the background because her words made it clear that Britons never shall be slaves. I have not made this up. He really wrote this.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademia+John Arrington Woodward Climate Denial and Techno-cornucopians — I mean, the confidence interval bit is actually not that bad. (Via +John Wehrle.)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Chris Blackmore Just play that one out. But without the fantasies. What's the timeline from about late October, post the party conferences if No Deal becomes the most likely end result. Because there's nothing on the table for the EU to vote on. I somehow can't believe that May and the current Tory government would actually survive till March 2019. There is no "just letting the time run out". That's fantasy. — More post mortem from Salzburg. For weeks the working assumption in Brussels had been that, on the Irish issue at least, a major step forward would be made by the next leaders’ summit in October. But over the coffee the prime minister dropped a bombshell. She did not believe it would be possible for the British government and Brussels to come to a solution by then. Six months after promising to come up with a fix that would avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland in all possible circumstances, the British appeared to be stalling for time again. Macron heard about this, and apparently lost his shit.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Engrumpled Curmudgeon An Ice Age? Is that when the House Of Commons freezes over? — Brussels has changed its attitude. Something is in the water, something is in the wind.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitAre we expecting a baby boom around 1-Jan-2020? — Looks like we are ready, boys! (Via +Gerhard Torges .)
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google Play MusicThere's another side issue here of the best way to move playlists from winamp to GPM and back again. Since GPM, GPM upload and Music Manager still don't understand standard .m3u and .pls playlist files. And there's no obvious way to download GPM playlists back to PC music players. — Is there any way of uploading a playlist from Android Play Music to Google Play Music? I don't mind going via a third party or via PC.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google Play MusicWell I've got a playlist of tracks local to the phone and in local storage. The tracks are also in my web GPM, but the playlist hasn't appeared. Do I have to do something to get it to sync with the web interface? As always it's kind of confusing where the music and playlists are. Is this one in local storage or in the cloud? The actual source of the playlist is a sync from winamp running on a laptop to the phone via USB. Winamp is reading files off a home NAS. It's been created on the phone as a .pla file, and the phones Play Music (and BlackPlayer) is reading it quite happily. Unfortunately, VLC-Android can't see it. All of this is trying to see if I can retire my ageing iPod and replace it with a phone upgraded with a big (256Gb) SD card. I'm still hitting limitations (eg 1000 track limit on playlists) that mean the phone is not yet as good as the iPod. — Is there any way of uploading a playlist from Android Play Music to Google Play Music? I don't mind going via a third party or via PC.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Joerg Fliege If you want a vision of the future, imagine a red stiletto from Jimmy Choo stamping on a human face - forever. In soft focus, with highlight lighting, wearing all white and a skirt that's just a little too narrow and a little too short. Now you have to work out if it's me being a bitch or her. — Lets hope that these statements are for domestic consumption and aimed at the hardliners in her own party. Because otherwise we are having a bit of a situation.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege"Unsafe at any speed" takes on a whole new meaning. Even stationary at a pedestrian crossing. — Another car for our Mad Max dystopian future. What's better than to barrel down the M25 at 170 km/h in a plywood box, with a propeller at the front to vanquish your foes? (Via +Lev Osherovich .)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaOf course schools function to condition individuals to their assigned roles. We may sneer at them, but society needs Deltas and Gammas to function. We can't all be Alphas and Betas. /s c/o Brave New World — I see that the "if you are poor then you are stupid" narrative is alive and well in English schools. Some secondary schools are failing teenagers from deprived backgrounds by giving them reading material for primary-age children, the head of Ofsted has warned. Amanda Spielman said she had been angered to find schools setting lower expectations for children simply because of their background. It follows evidence that students as old as 14 are being given English texts designed for primary children. In a wide-ranging interview with the Observer, Spielman said she had been driven “absolutely nuts” by evidence that some schools were assuming that disadvantaged children were “automatically low-achieving and need a watered-down curriculum”. The chief inspector also warned that the schools system had “stopped acting in children’s interests” by allowing thousands of underperforming pupils to be ushered out of the door to protect their school’s exam pass rates.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitFWIW, please try not to call them Brexiteers. They are Brexiters. The extra e in -eers implies some kind of dashing, swashbuckling, Russel Crowe, Francis Drake type. Other terms of abuse are of course acceptable. Especially Quitling. Given the confusion over Britain, British, Great Britain and so on, why didn't it get called Ukexit? Too close to UKIP? — Excellent news. The Brexit hardliner's attempt to plaster the newspapers with their plans backfired, and all they got was a thorough trashing by the media. Even the Daily Mail abandoned them. Meanwhile, the fingerpointing continues. The hard Brexiters now point at the May team, which might or might not have leaked news of Boris' divorce to journalists.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeAcoustic couplers FTW! — Hipsters have nothing on this guy. (Apparently a textbook illustration from a 1980ies technologies textbook. That modem though. Kids, I was there.)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaThe original post was about Britain and not the USA. But here we are again talking about the USA. I wonder how many people in the UK attended a private boarding school at some stage in their life. Somewhere between 1 and 10% of the population, I'd guess. Only a few of them end up as wealthy sociopathic bullies in public office. The vast majority end up as reasonably well adjusted, reasonably well off people living the typical UK middle class life of quiet desperation. However, central government does seem to be dominated by wealthy sociopathic bullies from private boarding schools. — When socially privileged children are separated from their families at a tender age, some develop what psychotherapists have called “Boarding School Syndrome”: “a defensive and protective encapsulation of the self,” in which they learn to hide emotion, fake maturity, and assert dominance over anyone weaker. They develop loyalty to their institutional tribe and suspicion of outsiders; they become bullies devoted to winning above all. If these traits sound familiar, it may be because the men who sent Britain careening into the catastrophe of Brexit—David Cameron, Boris Johnson, Nigel Farage—are all products of elite boarding schools, notorious symbols of social and economic inequality. For Britain’s privately educated leaders, politics is a ladder to be climbed, and policy-making a game. Never has this been clearer than in David Cameron’s colossal gamble on Brexit in the summer of 2016, when a referendum dominated by bad-faith messaging, data breaches, and campaign-finance violations triggered the UK’s limping exit from the European Union. It was not a cause for which the majority of citizens was seriously advocating. The only real victors so far have been those (often privately educated) financiers who made millions by betting on a massive drop in the value of the pound.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege"The Metropolitan Elite". "Tory-Voting, BMW-owners with an overwhelming sense of entitlement" "Mudlarks" — The struggle is real.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitSurrounded by buzzing furcups. — This is the most disgusting and vile cartoon on the Tory party that I have seen up to now. In other words, top notch work.
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Commented on post by Graham Reed in MotoGPShould be a lifetime ban. At the very least a ban for the rest of 2018. — Has Romano Fenati lost his mind???? Grabbing a rivals brake lever at 140mph!!! Misano moto2 GP today.
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Commented on post by Graham Reed in Motorcycle RoadracingI was sceptical. But it turns out a wide track and sweeping S bends produces close and hilarious racing. All 5 major races were superb. It's a shame they can't go a bit further round to Chapel before cutting back to the Wellington Straight. I veglia remember them using the same track back in the days of Lavilla. — BSB organisers have decided to use the Silverstone National Circuit for the upcoming race weekend. This follows the historic cancellation of the MotoGP meeting recently due to the amount of standing water experienced during prolonged rainfall.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Boris Borcic They said I was crazy, but when the crisis came I was ready. https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — That's quite an exclusive club we have down there at the bottom of the graph. Two of them have better beaches than the UK.
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Commented on post by Alan Stainer in Green Technology+Jaco Venter The business. not cheap, mind. https://www.altamotors.co/redshift-mx/ — Electric Bikes Another trip to the other Fully Charged. There are lots of nice electric bikes available these days and apparently there are lots on the roads as well.
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Commented on post by Alan Stainer in Green TechnologyThey're brilliant. Highly recommended. Even more fun are the highly illegal, off road versions. Full downhill bike but with 2kw through the gears. look for Bafang BBS02 and BBS-HD. Now can we please have shopper utility bikes. Sit up, comfy seat, rack and baskets front and rear, mudguards. And finally, we really need to sort out built in security. It shouldn't be an afterthought. And it should work. And it should be really easy to use so you always use it. There's too many thieving bastards in the big cities. — Electric Bikes Another trip to the other Fully Charged. There are lots of nice electric bikes available these days and apparently there are lots on the roads as well.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI was thinking more "Vera" than Breaking Bad. Grizzled veteran cop with a heart of gold, Treeza solves crimes around Maidenhead, endlessly driving her trusty Range Rover Discovery back and forth along the A4. All she's got at home is a bottle of scotch and a Charlie Bigham's Lasagne from Waitrose. Her sidekick Philip has got her back but will the disciplinary board let her get the job done before she gets told to stand down? — What is the name of this series? Is it on Netflix?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThe killer escapes through a wheat field. — What is the name of this series? Is it on Netflix?
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderWhat I find most impressive is that this is done with just 87 turbines of 7 and 8MW each. — The world's largest working offshore wind farm - covering an area equal to 20,000 football pitches - is due to open later off the coast of Cumbria.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeDid you buy one Apple Product? Only one? I'm sorry, Dave, I can't let you do that without buying into the entire ecosystem. — I upgraded to the latest version of iTunes.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeThe same treatment needs to be applied to all the other hope fiends in The Intellectual Dark Web (c). Perhaps in a TED talk. Climate change isn't that bad (yet, and may end up being less bad than the 97% think). And anyway, doing anything about it would cause far more hunger and food insecurity than climate change itself. (c Lomborg). It's true the oil will eventually run out. But with Fracking, Nuclear power, GMOs, Birth Control, Educating Women, Roundup, Neonics and moving everyone to cities, we can keep business as usual going until long after you've died. And without any of those pointless renewables that don't work and kill birds. So why worry? (c Ecomodern) Don't look at this constant rise in the numbers each year. Look at this falling percentage rise compared with the total each year. Extrapolate that out and the percentages will drop to zero, right? (c WorldInData) — Ouch, that hurts.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit8. Agnostics. What they want: A quiet life without Brexit. How many? The rest. I haven't done the numbers, but I'm pretty sure they're in a large majority. There's a lot in the Labour Party as well. "I campaigned and voted remain, but what can you do? The referendum happened and now we have to make the best of it." Some seek responsibility. Some have it thrust upon them. So now what are you going to do? Just follow the whip or stand for what you actually believe? — The eight Brexit tribes in the Tory party. Let me see. There are the Militant Brexiters, the ERG-lite, the Egomaniacs, the Careerists, the Pragmatists, the Soft-Brexit Rebel Coalition, the People's Vote Brigade, and the Agnostics. Not accounted for: the People's Front of Judea and the Judean People's Front. And then there is Labour.
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderInteresting point about this and other possible environments for life. Water based lifeforms (eg fish) have a roof to their environment. Even more so for life that exists in a liquid area with a frozen skin. The question is how that would shape their knowledge of the universe. — Water worlds could support life: Analysis challenges idea that life requires 'Earth clone'
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Commented on post by Woozle Hypertwin in Code DependencyBoth Android and ChromeOS seem to have a blind spot for Home NAS and samba shares. I came across this when asking how you were supposed to listen to your mp3 collection in google play music. And the answer is "upload to Google music and then stream it back again". There are obvious benefits to this with multiple devices. But after decades of collecting music, it feels absurd. And there are limitations. 320 not FLAC, syncing playlists is some time-ish, no support for m3u playlists, <1000 track playlists, <50k total tracks. And yet, VLC for android has no problem with any of this. And SMB/CIFS on linux is as old as the hills now. It begins to look like deliberate obtuseness not to support it. — +Android -- support for Windows network names when?? I'm tired of having to use IP addresses for my in-house servers, thanks. Don't make me set up my own DNS.
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Commented on post by Woozle Hypertwin in Code DependencyDid this happen? "Android Samba Client" seems to be 404. — +Android -- support for Windows network names when?? I'm tired of having to use IP addresses for my in-house servers, thanks. Don't make me set up my own DNS.
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Commented on post by Jenny Winder+Dave Wonnacott I think we just mis-heard. What they meant was "No Brexit is better than a Bad Brexit". At least I think that's what they should have said. — Brexit: Planes to be grounded if UK crashes out of EU without one-off air deal, Theresa May told 'If there are no alternative arrangements in place, it would be as bad as the worst fears suggest: planes would not be allowed to fly' #StopBrexitSaveBritain #PeoplesVote #FinalSay
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeAnother Chequers summit. Another set of useless compromises. Another bunch of resignations? — The government wants to "take stock" on Brexit preparations to see if the country "could survive" a no deal Brexit. Six months to go.
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderBread and pea soup, with a little dairy, eggs and the occasional meat. Fruit and veg mostly in season and with winter stores. That kind of diet is completely healthy and sustainable. The problem is that it doesn't really scale to 7.6b people. — If you want to save the world, veganism isn’t the answer Intensively farmed meat and dairy are a blight, but so are fields of soya and maize. There is another way
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderEven a final referendum will still require currently sitting MPs to cancel Art50. Which they could do without the referendum. Damn you, Representative Democracy! — Please sign and share #PeoplesVote #FinalSay #StopBrexitSaveBritain
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Commented on post by Jenny Winder+Pieter van Pelt FO. And I don't mean Foreign Office. Just because you don't fear the reaper, doesn't mean you shouldn't try to avoid him. — If you weren’t scared by the prospect of a no-deal Brexit before, you sure as hell should be now This isn’t ‘Project Fear’, it’s harsh reality – and even Dominic Raab has had to admit that #PeoplesVote #FinalSay #StopBrexitSaveBritain
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitMeanwhile, Hammond writes to Nicky Morgan to inform that the Treasury believes no-deal would crash the UK economy by nearly 8% and leave borrowing £80bn a year higher. https://twitter.com/PickardJE/status/1032638448757297152 Good timing. — First quick analysis of the first batch of 'no deal' papers that has been released by the government today. More bureaucracy. Lots of more bureaucracy. Tons of stuff will get more expensive, as VAT will apply on all small parcels coming in from the EU. Not a word about Northern Ireland. Or aviation, it seems. Oh, very important: up to now, the UK imported human sperm from Denmark. This will have to stop, of course. British boys will do their duty and step in, of course. Think of England!
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Commented on post by Armin Grewe in Europe, Brexit, Remoaning and all that nonsenseI looked at that photo and saw somebody rolling themselves a camberwell carrot. — When no deal is actually a deal. A very bad one to be precise, where you lose all the control you wanted to take back and introduce a huge bureaucracy instead of reducing it.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeISTR a plan to bury nuclear waste in the Cascadian sub-duction zone. Superficially sensible. Except that the sub-duction zones are the most earthquake active areas on the planet. Mainly it's yet another scale error (YASE). If you have a few 10s of million years the earth will suck it down. But in the mean time, it's just as liable to get thrown back up into the air or sea. As for chucking stuff in volcanoes, we have pretty much mastered fire now. To the point where we don't need to use natural fire just because it's there. Although, perhaps we could dump it on forest fires since they're going to burn anyway. — Interesting question. Even leaving the awkward logistics aside, the answer is 'no'.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeAlthough perhaps a complete withdrawal from the region and an end to drone bombing of the Afghani-Pakistan border areas might be no bad thing. Lest we forget, Afghanistan has a (porous) border with Iran. — What could possibly go wrong?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitHow ironic that so many of them write opinion pieces for that very organ. — We have become a nation run by people whose knowledge extends a mile wide but an inch deep; who know how to grasp the generalities of any topic in minutes, and how never to bother themselves with the specifics. Who place their confidence in their ability to talk themselves out of trouble, rather than learning how to run things carefully. And who were trained in this dubious art as teenagers: often together on the same university course. We have become a nation run by people whose knowledge extends a mile wide but an inch deep; who know how to grasp the generalities of any topic in minutes, and how never to bother themselves with the specifics. Who place their confidence in their ability to talk themselves out of trouble, rather than learning how to run things carefully. And who were trained in this dubious art as teenagers: often together on the same university course. [..] But other consequences are deeper still: the short-termism of our institutions is, in no small part, due to bluffing. As the Brexit preparations (or lack thereof) are beginning to demonstrate.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Doug Senko Cheap Afghani opium should take the edge off trying to cope with £7 a pint craft beer. — Anything in particular you want to bring into the UK post Brexit? A truck with dodgy meat? Some white powder? Or are you just into plain old human trafficking?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexithttps://twitter.com/PassportTotnes https://www.facebook.com/citystatetotnes/ https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — London next! Then Scotland, then Wales, then Cornwall!
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Technology Meets HumanityThe price for stealing fire and giving it to humans is to be chained to a rock and having your liver pecked out by an Eagle. For ever. So Technotopianism leads to cirrhosis of the liver? — "I'm highly pessimistic of human culture and optimistic of human nature." Jamie Wheal articulates a kind of updated Bodhisattva message in this interview. "Stay awake, build stuff."
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Analysis and News About GoogleHmmm? Android. Facebook app. Hamburger menu. see more. feeds. List feeds are still there. Seem to be identical to the browser versions. — Facebook Kills Friend List Feeds, The Best Feature Ever Stolen From Google+.
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Analysis and News About GoogleStill working for me in the web[1] version. Note also that Twitter has also had lists and list feeds for a long time. In both Twitter and facebook it's easiest to use browser bookmarks to get back to them as the UI to actually find the list feeds is awkward. My use case for this is to be be fairly indiscriminate about friending people. I then manually curate a "close friends" list which is my main way of viewing Facebook/Twitter. I then have a couple of special purpose community of interest lists eg "Motorcycle Racing". My use of Facebook boils down to three areas. 1) Close friends list feed 2) Pages list feed on pages I've liked and followed (I could do with sub-list curation on this as well) 3) Groups for specific communities of interest Between these and aggressive adblocking and function hiding with adblock and Stylus I can get high value and low noise out of Facebook. Finally improved with a bit of cutting down the notification settings. [1]With all social media sites, the browser version usually works better than the app version. If they'll let you use it. — Facebook Kills Friend List Feeds, The Best Feature Ever Stolen From Google+.
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Commented on post by Armin Grewe in Europe, Brexit, Remoaning and all that nonsense+Armin Grewe I have no idea what really happened in Salisbury, Amesbury and Douma (or even if they should be linked). But pretty much everything we've been told via the official channels makes no sense whatsoever. So it's hardly surprising the events are ripe with conspiracy theories. It's almost as if the official narratives were designed to generate conspiracy theories to obfuscate whatever it was that actually happened. While providing reasons to blame the Russians and justification to bomb stuff and expel diplomats. With extensive D Notices and gov-media pressure to control the state media and prevent the public media from asking too many questions. It's the 45 minutes/WMDs of 2018. Except executed by increasingly incompetent amateurs with even less credibility. IMHO. — A very valid point. Baffling. Why is the UK so complacent about Russia's meddling?
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Commented on post by Alan Stainer in Green TechnologyThis is one of many things I find deeply depressing about the design and style of current new builds. We're covering the SE of England with "Garden City" style "new villages". These consist of detached and semi-detached 3-4 bed room houses in cul de sacs with a tiny patch of garden and space for 1.5 cars. The trend is for 10 architecture designs chosen randomly and then laid out randomly so they all point in different directions. They're all white, cream, red brick, some times with some fake wood beams. Where are the - passive haus designs - electric car charging points - solar panels - basement storage - Victorian terraces - stacked 2 bedroom maisonettes - shops, pubs, play areas - places to walk the dog - social housing - Allotments and so on. Will these houses last >200 years like the previous housing stock in our villages and towns? Will they ever generate any feel of community? — Why aren't all new build houses fitted with solar? I have been saying this for a long time and it is a no brainer. If you are in the UK sign the petition! https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/218223
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeIn 100 days, they'll be playing Slade - Merry Xmas Everybody, 24/7. Is there a difference? — I pity the employees.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitNuclear weapons are not an answer to a break down of law and order. It's just one of many things they can't help with. — \begin{tinfoilhat} Modernising the armed forces when you absolutely have no money to spent might indicate the desire for some foreign adventure. Remember that Thatcher won an election due to the Falklands War. \end{tinfoilhat} The above, of course, would never happen in a mature democracy.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitJust say no to Bre卐it. — An increase of 23% in religious and racial hate crimes after the Brexit vote, with several police forces reporting an increase by 40% ? Surely just a blip, right? Nothing to do with enabling racists, right?
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Commented on post by Jenny Winderhttps://twitter.com/mattwridley/status/966074652006199296 Funny how right wing, climate denying, Bre卐iters just love Steven Pinker. — Brexit and the rejection of reason
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitAnother Brexit Cabinet away day. Another set of unworkable compromises that fall apart within hours. Will it bring another set of resignations? How about they have a cabinet summit on BINO and NOBREXIT. How about a cabinet summit on discarding "Red Lines". — A Cabinet summit on no-deal Brexit? I wonder what the agenda might be. 1) We are fucked. 2) How can we enrich ourselves? 3) Any other business.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThe one objective the present government has is to stay in power. Unfortunately, the one objective the present opposition has is to gain power. And their policy wonks also have an ideological objection to the EU, while believing that challenging Brexit is "political suicide". So both sides are practicing Kali-esque creative destruction, hoping something better for them will emerge from the wreckage. — Three signals suggest that we have entered the No Deal phase of the Brexit negotiations. (A) Liam Fox suggesting in the Times that the chance of No Deal is 60% (B) The eerie silence post Theresa May’s meeting with Macron (any positives would have been announced with great jubilation) (C) The Telegraph story suggesting the EU is legally obliged to provide the UK with a good deal - ie preemptive blame assignment. All rather plausible. The one objective the present government has is to stay in power. Preparing for Brexit or going for the EEA option would probably result in a leadership challenge, and so they just wait and hope that something happens. So the only chance left is to increase the political cost of the present 'carry on regardless' stance of the government. Not sure how can achieve that except by crashing the economy before Brexit.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit 1) England Leaving the EU 2) The UK staying together and Scotland, Wales, N.Ireland remaining part of the UK. — FFS.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Joseph Moosman Still no score after extra time so it goes to penalties. EU wins after Barnier stops one and Raab slips and Sky's one into the stands. — No one imagined a member state starting the negotiations clock before deciding on a negotiating position or delaying for over 15 months before seeking cabinet consensus on what kind of future relationship it sought. Don’t blame the treaty: the time pressure we’re now under is entirely of our own making. Must be something to do with those tax avoidance laws that the EU will enact in 2019. But intentions can change and an article 50 notification isn’t an irrevocable act. We could take the letter back at any time before 29 March 2019 or before the end of any agreed extra time. There would be no price, political or financial, to pay, because we would never have left. Behaving like a bull in a china shop does not come with a price? I know that this Guardian piece is written by the guy who drafted Article 50, but that sounds rather optimistic to me.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond+John Barker Satirical comment a month too late? An attempt at humour? It's your phone. Do what you want with it. Perhaps a bucket of water might help. — Are you going to hit the streets today? https://www.stopbrexitmarch.com/ https://www.theneweuropean.co.uk/top-stories/what-is-the-people-s-march-brexit-protest-and-rally-in-london-on-saturday-23-june-2018-1-5573899 https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-44575929 https://www.standard.co.uk/news/politics/brexit-march-2018-thousands-to-march-on-westminster-to-demand-second-referendum-a3869606.html Just Say No To Brexit
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderOk. So let's take this seriously. How exactly could this happen? At a minimum, it would require HoC to vote for it. So what are the pre-requisites for that to happen? — UK could cancel #Brexit and stay in EU on same terms, says French government 'We have always said, always, that the door would remain open,' says European affairs minister Nathalie Loiseau Do it! FFS DO IT! #PeoplesVote #StopBrexit
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Commented on post by Johnny Stork in PhilosophyCountries should have to prove that they can run fair elections before they should be allowed to give their people a vote. — Should People Need to Prove They Are Informed Before Being Allowed to Vote? "In 2016, Georgetown University political philosopher Jason Brennan published a controversial book, Against Democracy. He argued that democracy is overrated — that it isn’t necessarily more just than other forms of government, and that it doesn’t empower citizens or create more equitable outcomes." "According to Brennan, we’d be better off if we replaced democracy with a form of government known as “epistocracy.” Epistocracy is a system in which the votes of people who can prove their political knowledge count more than the votes of people who can’t. In other words, it’s a system that privileges the most politically informed citizens." #philosophy #democracy #epistocracy
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitDon't get ill. Especially, don't get ill enough to need blood products or imported medicines. https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — Tweet from Lisa O'Carroll (Guardian correspondent): BREAKING: Raab promises government will "make sure there is adequate food" in Britain in the event of no Brexit deal. But says it is wrong to say government itself is stockpiling "Adequate". Very reassuring.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitFor 30 years we've lived on Tripe. Now Brexit is coming, I don't know what we'll do. Never mind dear, I'll put the kettle on. We can have a nice cup of hot water. https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — Tweet from Lisa O'Carroll (Guardian correspondent): BREAKING: Raab promises government will "make sure there is adequate food" in Britain in the event of no Brexit deal. But says it is wrong to say government itself is stockpiling "Adequate". Very reassuring.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Gerhard Torges Just Say No To Bre卐it https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — The great Brexit con So what is Jacob Rees-Mogg up to with telling us that it might take 50 years to reap the benefits of Brexit? What he’s doing here is something con-men have always had to do – stopping their victim going to the police when the goods they have charged him for fail to arrive. This job is called cooling the mark out, as described back in 1952 by Erving Goffman: "An attempt is made to define the situation for the mark in a way that makes it easy for him to accept the inevitable and quietly go home. The mark is given instruction in the philosophy of taking a loss." Classican Nigerian scam. The millions are in a Swiss bank account, but there are some additional processing fees. There are three processes at work here: 1) Desire for consistency. "Once we have made a choice or taken a stand, we will encounter personal and interpersonal pressures to behave consistently with that commitment." 2) 'If its expensive it must be good'. Expensive placebos work better than cheap ones. Expensive cars. Trump salesmanship. University fees. Initiation rites in the military and the workplace. Stuff we have worked hard for we value more, even if there is no rational argument for it. 3) Sunk costs. We’ve come so far and paid so much we can’t turn back now. Good conmen can work all three processes to squeeze out their mark even more. Watch out for deregulation requests. We need to get rid of all these worker's rights to be more competitive. After all, we have come so far. It will be a small price to pay.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Gilles Bourdin Cry "Chapeau" for irony. — The great Brexit con So what is Jacob Rees-Mogg up to with telling us that it might take 50 years to reap the benefits of Brexit? What he’s doing here is something con-men have always had to do – stopping their victim going to the police when the goods they have charged him for fail to arrive. This job is called cooling the mark out, as described back in 1952 by Erving Goffman: "An attempt is made to define the situation for the mark in a way that makes it easy for him to accept the inevitable and quietly go home. The mark is given instruction in the philosophy of taking a loss." Classican Nigerian scam. The millions are in a Swiss bank account, but there are some additional processing fees. There are three processes at work here: 1) Desire for consistency. "Once we have made a choice or taken a stand, we will encounter personal and interpersonal pressures to behave consistently with that commitment." 2) 'If its expensive it must be good'. Expensive placebos work better than cheap ones. Expensive cars. Trump salesmanship. University fees. Initiation rites in the military and the workplace. Stuff we have worked hard for we value more, even if there is no rational argument for it. 3) Sunk costs. We’ve come so far and paid so much we can’t turn back now. Good conmen can work all three processes to squeeze out their mark even more. Watch out for deregulation requests. We need to get rid of all these worker's rights to be more competitive. After all, we have come so far. It will be a small price to pay.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI'm sure Waitrose will sort something out. — Tweet from Lisa O'Carroll (Guardian correspondent): BREAKING: Raab promises government will "make sure there is adequate food" in Britain in the event of no Brexit deal. But says it is wrong to say government itself is stockpiling "Adequate". Very reassuring.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIf we had a multi-choice referendum with transferable 2nd (or more) choices, are 3 enough? As I said earlier, there seem to be at least 6 identifiable options: ND (No Deal), HB (Hard), CC (Chequers), BINO (Name Only), ED (Endless Delay), NOB (No-Brexit). Regardless of a popular vote, we actually need MPs to vote on these. And parliamentary voting does not allow 2nd choices. IF MPs could have a free vote on these 6 options what would they vote for? And would they vote on their conscience and beliefs or on their perception of what their electing constituents wanted? All of which is just idle speculation, because the end game is not going to play out like this. It's going to involve knives, backs and meat hooks. — YouGov polling result, from 19/20 July 2018.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeOriginal: http://voidstar.com/images/cctv.jpg Related: http://voidstar.com/images/chemical_lge_2.jpg Watchful Eyes: http://voidstar.com/images/secure.jpg — The Civil Service Quarterly, a publication of the Cabinet Office, accidentally used a Scarfolk poster as the latest cover. The poster encourages parents to shoot their children. OK you good folks, what do you think? How accidental was this?
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeThe civil service have produced some wonderful posters in their time. The "Beneath the watchful eyes" series were classics. My fav is this Anti-Terrorism poster encouraging the public to report anything suspicious. http://voidstar.com/images/sonic_attack.jpg — The Civil Service Quarterly, a publication of the Cabinet Office, accidentally used a Scarfolk poster as the latest cover. The poster encourages parents to shoot their children. OK you good folks, what do you think? How accidental was this?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI wonder what preparations and warnings they're giving out in N Ireland. Stockpile red diesel? Get dual nationality and move south? — 'Britain steps up doomsday planning for no-deal Brexit' A 10-mile-long motorway in south-east England can be shut and turned into a lorry park to cope with tailbacks from the port of Dover if Britain crashes out of the EU with no deal, under one plan being considered by the government. The M26 in Kent would become a “holding area” for up to 1,400 goods vehicles to try to ease the gridlock as up to 10,000 lorries a day suddenly require customs checks to enter the EU. Over the summer, the government will start issuing weekly advice to businesses and households on how to prepare for a “disorderly” Brexit and 70 technical notes are being prepared. As part of the preparations, some 250,000 small businesses will be asked to start making customs declarations, in a dry run for a hard Brexit. I wonder how many people will wake up then. In the face of heavy traffic at the ports, however, HMRC said on Thursday that it would prioritise keeping the “flow moving” over collecting duties. About 5,000 new customs officials will be needed if there is no Brexit deal, and 1,113 have so far been hired, HMRC said. Taking back control.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond6 Now. ND = No Deal HB = Hard Brexit CC = Chequers Compromise BINO = Brexit In Name Only ED = Endless Delay NOB = No Brexit — 5 Brexit Options - Full Brexit JRM, BJ, DD, ERG. Crash out in the biggest possible way. - Chequers Compromise The impossible middle way. Not acceptable to pretty much everyone. EU, Leavers, Remainers, N Ireland, etc, etc, - Brexit in Name Only Leave EU but not any EU structure. Stay in the Customs Union, Single Market, 4 freedoms, ECJ, Euratom, etc, etc. Sensible, but not actually acceptable to anyone. - Delay Negotiate 2-year stays of execution. Repeat indefinitely. Give up control but don't change anything. Wait until political climate changes. - Cancel Art50 and Remain This is probably possible but nobody really knows the implications. Full Euro and Schengen as a minimum payment for wasting the EU's time? https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jul/16/back-second-brexit-vote-says-conservative-mp-justine-greening We are so screwed. But we're heading into an end game. And people are beginning to talk about the break up of the UK 2 party system. And some fundamental re-alignments. Which is going to be tricky because the sensible middle ground consists of MPs who have never rebelled and never gone against their party's whip. It's hard to see how they could grow a backbone and do anything. While simultaneously holding their nose and cooperating with the other tribe. More likely is that the extremes of each party break away. Leaving 2 rump parties, neither of which can get a majority.
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Commented on post by Jenny WinderThere is no answer to N Ireland that is acceptable to everyone. And the only two that actually work are BINO (Brexit In Name Only) and NOB (No-Brexit). ND (No Deal), HB (Hard Brexit) and CC (Chequers Compromise) simply don't work. Those three all require abandoning N Ireland which will bring down the government. The Tories and the factions within it (especially ERG) are still publicly in denial about this. But unfortunately, BINO and NOB will also bring down the government. Labour is very slowly inching towards BINO without really publicly opposing. Get the summer holidays out the way and we're into the end game. -- 6 options Now. ND = No Deal HB = Hard Brexit CC = Chequers Compromise BINO = Brexit In Name Only ED = Endless Delay NOB = No Brexit — May's Brexit proposals have been two years in the making. They were killed off in Brussels within eight minutes Does it feel like the risk that was taken with our children and our children’s children’s futures might not be paying off? #BrexitShambles #StopBrexit
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI suspect it's actually a subset of psychopathocracy: Sociopathocracy Achieved via a Pigopolist Tendency. — 'The Brexit campaign represents a triumph for a view of politics as mere marketing.' Many leftist remainers accuse Brexiters of being neoliberal. In one sense, this is questionable: "fuck business" is not a neoliberal sentiment, and nor is a desire for harsh immigration controls. (Many) Brexiters, however, have a different conception [of politics]. To them, politics is simply about getting what you want by whatever means you can, regardless of cost. We could have had a rational debate in the referendum about the trade-off between sovereignty and prosperity. But we didn’t. Those Brexiters who now privately claim that the loss of ‘hundreds of thousands of jobs’ would be worth it didn’t say so at the time. For them, getting what they wanted trumped duties of honesty. Of course, the Brexiters might have won an honest and legal campaign, but they never took that chance. In this sense, Brexit is like spivs mis-selling financial products. All that matters is that the sale gets booked, that the seller gets his bonus. The cost of achieving those sales – the future fines that’ll be paid by some other mugs - doesn’t matter. The author then claims that all this falls under the remit of neoliberalism. I don't know. It falls more under the remit of psychopathism, if you ask me. Its not a kleptocracy or an oligarchy, its a psychopathocracy.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitN Ireland either gets more complicated or is reaching some clarity depending on your point of view. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/19/theresa-may-i-will-never-accept-eus-ideas-on-irish-brexit-border Any kind of border between N Ireland and the rest of the UK was never going to fly but is now impossible. But Theresa wants to say that "Regulatory alignment", even temporarily, in the event of no deal is also impossible. Quite the dilemma. The Irish border is still the problem that will bring down all the rest. — I see that the new Brexit negotiator has arrived in Brussels.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeDonald Poutine — The new Time cover is a thing of beauty.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit5 Brexit Options - Full Brexit / NoDeal. JRM, BJ, DD, ERG. Crash out in the biggest possible way. - Today's Chequers Compromise. The impossible middle way. Not acceptable to pretty much everyone. EU, Leavers, Remainers, N Ireland, etc, etc, - Brexit in Name Only. Leave EU but not any EU structure. Stay in the Customs Union, Single Market, 4 freedoms, ECJ, Euratom, etc, etc. Sensible, but not actually acceptable to anyone. - Delay. Negotiate 2-year stays of execution via "Transition Periods". Repeat indefinitely. Give up control but don't change anything. Wait until political climate changes. - Cancel Art50 and Remain. This is probably possible but nobody really knows the implications. Full Euro and Schengen as a minimum payment for wasting the EU's time? We are so screwed. But we're heading into an end game. — That went exactly as expected. Led by Michel Barnier’s deputy, Sabine Weyand, the EU’s team of officials picked apart the most contentious parts of the paper as it was presented by Olly Robbins, Theresa May’s chief Brexit adviser, leading to increased concerns on both sides that a no-deal scenario is moving from possible to likely. “The white paper is not going to form the basis of the negotiations,” one senior EU diplomat told the Guardian.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeOi, Football, FFS man! Go home. You're drunk. And put some clothes on. — Approbating success, the Sun style.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI remember the gang of four and the Social Democratic Party (SDP). That was eminently sensible from eminently sensible people. But look where that led. Maybe there is room for a Pro-EU, Pro-Remain, Centrist, Mixed Economy, Social Democratic, Unionist Party. And if the other extremes fragment into Left, Right, UKIP, DUP, Sinn Fein it might well command a substantial majority. But to get from here to there would mean long-term moderate Tory and (Blairite) Labour MPs holding their noses to come together. And moderate MPs who have never voted against the whip and always hold the party line growing a backbone and actually rebelling. The only way I see this happening is the minority crazies of each major party leaving to each start their own new "One True X". So that the respective rumps end up as equal major parties neither of which can get anywhere near a majority. Followed by a temporary Tory-Labour pact. — Well, one can hope.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeThe 4 of them on the red carpet at Blenheim Palace with the mass guards band doing the full 10 minute fan fare perfectly timed to close the evening news. And our Treeza's showing a bit of ham and eggs. https://youtu.be/KCP0-XfbyRU?t=43 What a picture, what a photograph Stick it in your family, Stick it in your family, ... Al - bum — Borowitz is off the chains.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThis is a fake satirical site, right? — Holy guacamole, they have a Brexit plan. The Conservatives have a public Brexit plan. Well, at least they have a succinct URL: https://www.conservatives.com/brexitplan Anyone wants to count the inconsistencies which puts this into unicorn land?
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeSaxifrage or Sexy Farage? Only one of them is succulent. — Dear iOS, If you autocorrect "Frage" to "Farage" one more time, I am going back to Windows.
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Commented on post by Armin Grewe in Europe, Brexit, Remoaning and all that nonsense"Riots" could mean a lot of different things. Cable St or Tottenham, or The Troubles. A bit of unpleasantness with a handful of EDL/BNP is quite likely, but more than that? — Also be prepared for riots, as Farage will call for them. And at least some of his followers will oblige.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitExtend. Got to keep power till 2022. — Crash, capitulate, or extend? So what's going to happen? Leave your opinion in the comments. I might take bets.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitYou gotta be sure that it's something Everybody's gonna talk about Before you decide that the times arrived For making your mind up https://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — The Raft of the Maydusa Adrift at sea. And look how happy Macron is to see the back of the Brits.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThis one was particularly good. https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DSEQXRnWsAAGJ5R.jpg Of course the UK refugees won't be allowed to land anywhere in the EU. Except maybe Gibraltar. — The Raft of the Maydusa Adrift at sea. And look how happy Macron is to see the back of the Brits.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt was an ironic comment. It's Theresa May that is putting lives at risk in N. Ireland over Brexit by failing to offer a realistic solution to the N Ireland problem. Double the hypocrisy. — Theresa tries blackmailing. Its not very effective.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWas she referring to N. Ireland? — Theresa tries blackmailing. Its not very effective.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitYou can't build cars here. This is batshit country. — Where we are going, we don't need any cars!
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexita sizeable minority of relatively well-off and relatively well-educated people who voted leave because they thought the EU imposed on the sovereignty of the UK I've lost friends and wont speak to them any more over this. Left wing at 19, right wing capitalist at 29, fascist bastard at 59. And these are people that travel frequently in Europe and by any standard are European. How does that happen? There's often a well developed and well argued cognitive dissonance here. They'll find a way to argue in favour of Scottish, N Irish and Welsh independence because "if I argue for independence from the EU, how can I argue against independence from Westminster". But they don't seem to be able to see just how destructive they're being. Or they'll turn that into a positive and start talking about creative destruction and new beginnings. If you meet Shiva on the road, just shoot him. Especially if he's wearing the mask of Kali. — Long report (well, 27 pages PDF, [1]) on why Britain voted leave. TL;DR: as in many an analysis before, it's the xenophobic and the racists that expressed their vote. And these traits correlate strongly with age (positively) and education (negatively). Add to this toxic mix the left behinders who just want to stick it to the man. The one newsworthy bit seems to be that there is a sizeable minority of relatively well-off and relatively well-educated people who voted leave because they thought the EU imposed on the sovereignty of the UK. The other news is how well-entrenched those feelings are and have been. [1] http://www.matthewjgoodwin.org/uploads/6/4/0/2/64026337/leave_vote_lecture.pdf
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit"Only 156 MPs had campaigned for an outcome (Leave) that was supported by a majority of people in 401 seats." Also turn that around. A large number of MPs campaigned for Remain and personally voted for Remain were elected in constituencies that had a majority for Leave. In 2015, they made this clear. And largely in 2017, they didn't stand for their views but for acceptance of the referendum. This is troublesome. And a big part of Labour's problems with positioning. It also reflects that voting in general elections is tribal and rarely for the individual MP or the individual MP's views. The MP can be seriously out of step with their constituents providing they stand for the correct party. And having been elected, especially when there is a narrow majority, they can't realistically rebel. So we get the distasteful sight of comparatively sensible MPs voting with the whip and against their actual views. — Long report (well, 27 pages PDF, [1]) on why Britain voted leave. TL;DR: as in many an analysis before, it's the xenophobic and the racists that expressed their vote. And these traits correlate strongly with age (positively) and education (negatively). Add to this toxic mix the left behinders who just want to stick it to the man. The one newsworthy bit seems to be that there is a sizeable minority of relatively well-off and relatively well-educated people who voted leave because they thought the EU imposed on the sovereignty of the UK. The other news is how well-entrenched those feelings are and have been. [1] http://www.matthewjgoodwin.org/uploads/6/4/0/2/64026337/leave_vote_lecture.pdf
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Doug Senko https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96I2CWHa_-A The Brexit Anthem Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers - Roadrunner comes to mind as well. "Turn the Radio On". And all I hear is the Radio 4 Today programme. — Here comes the next.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt's just politics. But 'jeez, what is wrong with these people? Won't anyone actually stand up for what they believe in? My own Tory MP will tell you he was a Remainer, who voted Remain and believes we should stay in the EU. But has never, ever, ever, voted against the whip. And is quite happy to say "Well the referendum happened so what can you do? All we can do now is try and make the best of it". — Grieve and his rebels have climbed down: they voted against their own tabled amendment. Final outcome 303:319. Apparently, they settled for a concession that recognised "the authority of MPs to hold the government to account, and saying that it would be for the Speaker to decide at the time whether any government motion could be amended." Which means, basically, that the final part of the Grieve amendment has been killed off. Hard Brexiters are very happy.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeIf you're in the UK pointing at USA child internment camps, remember Yarls Wood. G4S and Serco are much more efficient at this stuff. The Private Prison (Military Entertainment) Industrial Complex is global now. — Ah, the "totally not like Nazi Germany" excuse. That's where we are.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Lee Rothstein The UK system is complicated. Trying to explain how an un-elected chamber that is stuffed with a mix of political appointments, hereditary representatives and other specialists is part of our ancient and developing democratic process may take a while. It's different, not undemocratic. If it helps, think of it as a large advisory body that votes internally on it's view of what ought to be done. That view is then taken as advice by the elected representatives. But then I was born and live here, and frankly, I don't really understand it either. — Aaaaand we are back to the House of Commons. The House of Lords wacked the Grieve amendment back to the Commons with a vote of 354:235. Grieve and his rebels (read: sensible Leavers) had been doublecrossed by May last week. May had promised to leave the Grieve amendment as it is, the rebels didn't rebel, and May turned around and deleted the amendment from the bill. Not so fast, said the House of Lords. Wednesday's parliamentary debate is going to be interesting.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitDo they think we're stupid? Yes. — All going according to plan.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliegehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deoNAOfkXxc — On someone who got his leg amputated after an accident, and decided to take his leg home. And cook it. (Recipe: marinate overnight and sautee with onions, peppers, salt, pepper, and lime juice. Served on corn tortillas with a tomatillo sauce.) Supposed to be very beefy, akin to venison. Maybe I should invite my PhD students for dinner.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademia+Edward Morbius +1 for Idries Shah - World Tales. Wonderful book. — On memory palaces, and song lines. (Via +Rhys Taylor.)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit- Nessie (Scotland voted remain, nearly voted for independence) - Minis (owned by BMW) - Didcot power station. Fell down while being dismantled What else can you spot? — German sheep, Italian architects, Greek engineers, Seraphim fish dishes, potatoes from across the Atlantic, and other totally British concepts.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeThere's a thought that won't go away. Trump (and the USA) thinks he's playing poker or american football or some "OK Corral", Mexican standoff, duel thing or fixed odds slot machines. N Korea (and China) are playing Go. — Kim seems to have completely out-negotiated Trump, and it’s scary that Trump doesn’t seem to realize this.
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Commented on post by Sisco Vanilla in Mixology 🍸It's all about the Vermouth. Cocchi Torino is a rare treat. Beware though, there's a LOT of sugar in a Negroni. Not sure about all this stirring and then pouring. Just chuck all the ingredients in a rocks glass with plenty of rocks, give it a stir and you're done. — It's Negroni week and here is the classic Negroni. Equal parts @campariofficial @plymouthginus and Vermouth Rosso. Garnish with Orange peel. As usual the Campari stands out and gets me on the back of the tongue. But mind you it's a pleasurable hit on the tongue. A tu salud!!! #FinnsCorner #Negroni #CountNegroni #NegroniWeek #Campari #PlymouthGin #VermouthRosso #Cocktail #Cocktails #Coctel #Cocteles #Cocteleria #SiscoVanilla #SiscoVanillaIsStepping
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Commented on post by Miyon Ishikawa in MotoGPHas there been a formal announcement that he's retiring? — Good bye! , Good luck! & Thank you❣️ LITTLE SAMURAI "Dani" Pedrosa 26
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in EnvironmentSuccessfully trolled Stewart Brand into tweeting the word, "terafart". Mission accomplished. Achievement unlocked. https://twitter.com/stewartbrand/status/1005133139939766274 — The #terafart What mankind does when we dump 1 Tera-Tonne of Carbon (1 TtC) into the atmosphere by burning all the accessible fossil fuel, mixed in with some methane liberated from the melting tundra. It isn't completed yet but we're well on the way with business as usual. We're currently blowing 8 Giga-tonnes of Carbon (8GtC) into the atmosphere per year. And it's still accelerating no matter what gets pledged for the Paris Climate talks. Deep human history to 1970 =~ 185GtC, 1970 to 2010 =~ 185GtC. 2010 to 2100 is predicted to be 700-1400GtC. That's one hell of a "Whale Fall". Unlike a real whale fall, there won't be another one. We get just one shot at this and when the whale's gone, it's gone. After that, it's all renewable sustainability. Hat tip to https://heteromeles.wordpress.com/ for coming up with the idea, described in http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hot-Earth-Dreams-climate-happens/dp/1517799392/ref=sr_1_1 
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege+Gilles Bourdin 1) She chose her path. So she gets no sympathy from me. 2) All heads of state age prematurely. If they don't, there's something fishy going on. 3) There is no plan. There is no hidden agenda. WYSIWYG. The headless chicken behaviour is real. 4) The bondage chain jewellery still scares me. Every PM is born free; and everywhere they are in chains. — Still no plan. Two years gone, and no plan.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege404 not found — Glitch in the matrix?
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Artificial Intelligence8) Be Most Excellent To Humans 9) Don't Be A Dick — Google sets out its principles around artificial intelligence. Encouraging. 1. Be socially beneficial. 2. Avoid creating or reinforcing unfair bias. 3. Be built and tested for safety. 4. Be accountable to people. 5. Incorporate privacy design principles. 6. Uphold high standards of scientific excellence. 7. Be made available for uses that accord with these principles: Many technologies have multiple uses. We will work to limit potentially harmful or abusive applications. As we develop and deploy AI technologies, we will evaluate likely uses in light of the following factors: Primary purpose and use: the primary purpose and likely use of a technology and application, including how closely the solution is related to or adaptable to a harmful use Nature and uniqueness: whether we are making available technology that is unique or more generally available Scale: whether the use of this technology will have significant impact Nature of Google’s involvement: whether we are providing general-purpose tools, integrating tools for customers, or developing custom solutions
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitJust as long as they don't help the Conservatives avoid defeat by abstaining or voting with them every step along the way until it's too late. It's such a dangerous game. — Step by step, Labour moves towards reality. Now they can already see the end of the tunnel.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThere doesn't seem to be a generic name for followers and supporters of Jacob Rees-Mogg. I suggest "The Moggies". — Sky News has also heard of major UK automotive suppliers now ceasing UK supply of major components to cars for export to countries currently covered by EU Free Trade Areas - countries such as South Korea, South Africa and Canada. Andrew Varga of Seetru, a manufacturer of safety valves in Bristol, said that last autumn, many existing customers showed caution in taking UK parts into new models. "There was an 'oh my god moment' last August. Our customers don't have the infrastructure to manage UK certificates of origin," he said. Looks like we need to sell more fish. And turnips.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+michael cole The real question. Does the UK leave or only England while the new countries of Scotland, Wales, and Norn stay in the EU? I have very little faith in another referendum being fought on the basis of rational thought and facts. So I thinks it's exceedingly dangerous. The only good ending would be 75-25 remain and upwards and I just don't think that's possible. Which leaves some possibilities. - An autumn 2018 general election in which Labour narrowly win. But perhaps somebody could explain how this would change anything. At all. - A minimum Brexit where we stay in all the EU institutions. Customs union, Single market, Euratom, ECJ. Formally and indefinitely. - A minimum Brexit where we stay in all the EU institutions for repeated temporary periods of 2 years. - Crash out (and burn) with no deal on 29 March 2019 — Here’s the thing, the last great taboo of Brexit, the unsayable. But I’ll say it anyway because it’s true: the British public were not smart enough to understand the consequences of Brexit. This isn’t elitist. Nobody was smart enough. We were all too ignorant, too lied to, too manipulated by media, too encouraged to believe the failings of domestic politics were someone else’s fault, and too hypnotised by abstracts such as “sovereignty” “taking back control”, “red, white and blue Brexit”. Deceits dressed up as patriotism. Based on this, the author then makes the case for a second referendum. Informed, clear-eyed, snapped free from hypnosis. While I think the premise is correct, the case made looks weak to me.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeI get a surprising amount of misdirected emails to the address without the dot. But not yet any phishing that doesn't also get caught by gmail's junk filters. — This blasted gmail feature has to go.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitFormer chancellor, fervent Brexiteer ... and Climate Change Denier. — Fantastic stuff from the Brexit comedians.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt's all just gammon and spinnage, gammon and spinnage. Maybe it's like the multiple buffalo sentence given that gammon now refers to a class of people as well as a cured meat and a form of common gossip. Gammon gammon gammons gammon gammon gammon. Hmm: Is it a verb[1] as well? [1]I never met a noun I couldn't verb. — "I felt a great disturbance in the Brexit, as if millions of gammons suddenly cried out in anger..."
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademialol! The "3" trick in YT is brilliant. Did not know that one. — Listing authors in alphabetical order discriminates against X, Y, and Z. And I am not being facetious: apparently, having a last name starting with A improves your chances of getting tenure by 26%, as opposed to someone whose last name starts with Z.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeThe X Market will be Y big in Z years. How X will kill Y. X is going to be the Y of Z. X vs Y - Who will win? These articles write themselves. I strongly suspect that in 2018 that's literally true and not just a metaphor. — Not bad for your first quest. Now take on Twitter.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaHow does that explain why so many of my favourite SciFi authors begin with S? — Listing authors in alphabetical order discriminates against X, Y, and Z. And I am not being facetious: apparently, having a last name starting with A improves your chances of getting tenure by 26%, as opposed to someone whose last name starts with Z.
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Commented on post by Graham Reed in Motorcycle RoadracingI hope he makes a full recovery. And I also hope he retires and doesn't return to racing. Last year and early this year, he was obviously still fast, but I definitely got the impression that he wasn't prepared to really push it any more. So much as I wanted him to push all the BSB records beyond reach, enough is enough. — Superbike star Shane Byrne ‘in good spirits’ after surgery following brutal crash Shakey suffered a fracture to his back plus several other injuries during a test session at Snetterton.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Motorcycle RoadracingThink I'm imagining it as I can't find pictures now of what I thought I saw on TV in parc ferme — Congrats to Van Der Mark. Just noticed something strange VdM uses two levers on the left bar of his Yamaha. Is this the Pasini option? Or an alternative for a rear brake?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitNot so much the US as a 3rd world developing country from the old commonwealth, circa 1930. Decaying infrastructure, huge inequality, stifling bureaucracy. — Austerity Britain, year 8. A view from the other side of the pond. They say the UK resembles the US more than any European state. I don't think that's a compliment anymore. Ah, well. The Tory government. This is all going according to plan.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademia+Joerg Fliege That's 750 years of mission creep and counting. There used to be an apocryphal story that you could walk from Trinity College to the City of London on Trinity land but you had to go via Cornwall. The current situation is like some Time Travel SciFi where the protagonist goes back centuries to invest pocket change at 1%/yr interest. And needs to liquidate the investment fund that now owns the world to fund building the time machine. And yes, it is way past time they divested from fossil fuels and invested ethically. — Things you could do if you had an appropriate endowment.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Boris Borcic I remember that slogan. "Let June be the End of May". Turned out well, didn't it. — First she is running through wheat fields, now she is playing hide and seek. Will she ever grow up? And then there is this: Last week the British negotiating team proposed that the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), the largest data protection authority in the EU, sit on the body that will regulate the new GDPR data rules. It also wishes to be part of the “one-stop shop” mechanism, whereby only one supervisory authority, rather than multiple bodies across the EU, decides on cross-border data disputes, so at to give EU and UK firms greater certainty. Are these people completely mad?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Andrew Meir There's no need for bad language. We'll have none of your foreign muck here. — Liam Fox has been wrong?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitZulus. Thousands of 'em. Coming over here. Blowing the bloody doors off! — Splendid rant. So many movie references. Dominic Cummings as the villain with the brilliant plan, foiled by his own idiotic henchmen. The Tories as Ladykillers, slowly stalking each other. And Boris Johnson was supposed to blow only the doors off.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitYes, But, "The Dilemma" doesn't make it clear enough. The Dilemma is that there is no solution to achieving Brexit that doesn't do huge harm to the country and to the Union. I'm in favour of some legal government and popular route to deciding what happens. And before Art50 completes so there is a realistic chance of calling the whole thing off. But it has to be made completely clear what the choice is. And it looks like it may be 3 way, not 2 way. - Try and negotiate a cancellation of Art50. - Leave but stay in the Customs Union and Single Market - Leave and crash out of everything, with all that entails. The full monte of no nukes, hard N.I. border, Dover chaos, Closing City of London, Scottish independence, etc etc etc. Calling it "The Dilemma" is meaningless if you don't understand what the "The Dilemma" means or can twist into something else. And yes, Labour's equivocation is doing nobody any good. And it's not "Blairite" to say it. — Yes, I know. It's Blair. Bear with me. Bear with him for two minutes. He is saying that Labour lost it. Labour lost the Leave voters, for accepting a customs union. And Labour lost the Remain voters, as a route to avoid Brexit. I agree with his analysis. His solution? Tell people that Labour accepts the referendum outcome, but that there is no resolution to the dilemma, and that thus the people should have a final vote.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademiaunsliced in a paper bag in a bread bin. I have no idea where that sits. — Moved from lawful good to chaotic neutral. What might my next steps be?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIs this the moment when the Tories flip and campaign on "Stop Brexit", leaving the Labour party stuck on "Brexit: Will O'People[1], for jobs"? [1]Ah, yes. William O'People. One of the famous O'Peoples of Armagh. — Not another one!
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Social Problems and Social ChangeThe Intellectual Dark Web - A long form justification for a categorisation https://medium.com/the-abs-tract-organization/enlightening-the-intellectual-dark-web-41f3a1e81b3e Joe Rogan, Steven Pinker, Camille Paglia, Owen Benjamin, Eric Weinstein, Nicholas Christakis, Gad Saad, Heather Heying, James Damore, Douglas Murray, Jonathan Haidt, Tim Ferriss, Stephen Hicks, Dave Rubin, Quillette/ Claire Lehmann, Jordan Peterson, Christina Hoff Sommers, Ben Shapiro, Dan Carlin, Lindsay Shepherd, Maajid Nawaz, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Sam Harris, and Bret Weinstein Also, https://www.vox.com/the-big-idea/2018/5/10/17338290/intellectual-dark-web-rogan-peterson-harris-times-weiss Now look at the kind of company that Pinker keeps. https://twitter.com/mattwridley/status/966074652006199296 Matt Ridley, Steven Pinker, Max Roser together at last! Outside the UK Houses of Parliament, and self described as "liberal optimists and protagonists of progress". — Progress is progressive. A powerful refutation to Stephen Pinker's "Enlightenment Now" by Jeremy Lent. It’s time to reclaim the mantle of “Progress” for progressives. By falsely tethering the concept of progress to free market economics and centrist values, Steven Pinker has tried to appropriate a great idea for which he has no rightful claim.
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Commented on post by Yonatan Zunger in Today I Learned:Some far future archaeologist. "We think they may have been wiped out by an asteroid. We've found traces of lead in a thin layer of sedimentary rock in a large number of locations. This points to an event approximately 300m years ago give or take 5m. The most likely source is a heavy metal rich asteroid but we're still looking for suitable candidates for crater sites." Are we sure that the Iridium layer isn't evidence of a technological dinosaur civilisation based on using Iridium jewellery as currency? — Roman coin production produced lead pollution - and that left traces in the Greenland ice pack clear enough for us to read out Roman economic history. This is not the sort of scientific result I ever expected to see from an ice core. Via +A.V. Flox
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Commented on post by Yonatan Zunger in Today I Learned:Is this another candidate marker for the beginning of the anthropocene? — Roman coin production produced lead pollution - and that left traces in the Greenland ice pack clear enough for us to read out Roman economic history. This is not the sort of scientific result I ever expected to see from an ice core. Via +A.V. Flox
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Commented on post by John Wehrle in Scientific WhatnotUgh. TL;DR! Many of these things are worth doing in their own right. However, I have to keep coming back to scale. Roughly: 10GtC/Yr turned into 30GtCO2/yr until the 1TtC of easily accessible fossil carbon is all gone. In one last #terafart . Leading to a temperature rise of at least 5C. And 200k years before CO2 and temperatures drop back again to pre-industrial levels. In the end and on a 100K year timescale, it's mostly rock weathering that locks up atmospheric CO2. — One way to pull our carbon out of the atmosphere is to cultivate plants in such a way that they do the hard work for us. (Seagrass can do the same thing with our oceans.) Such methods are now gaining steam thanks in no small part to state incentives and state cap and trade programs. (Vote in your state and local elections people.) I found this from an +Azimuth (and +galen stone and +rasha kamel) of this article from Grist about a CA program to work with farms to test our these strategies: https://grist.org/article/california-is-turning-farms-into-carbon-sucking-factories/ Quoting in full because a lot of people can't afford a NYT subscription. From NYT Magazine: Can Dirt Save The Earth? By Moises Velasquez-Manoff (4/18/18) [Warning, it's long] When John Wick and his wife, Peggy Rathmann, bought their ranch in Marin County, Calif., in 1998, it was mostly because they needed more space. Rathmann is an acclaimed children’s book author — “Officer Buckle and Gloria” won a Caldecott Medal in 1996 — and their apartment in San Francisco had become cluttered with her illustrations. They picked out the 540-acre ranch in Nicasio mostly for its large barn, which they planned to remake into a spacious studio. Wick, a former construction foreman — they met when he oversaw a renovation of her bathroom — was eager to tackle the project. He knew the area well, having grown up one town away, in Woodacre, where he had what he describes as a “free-range” childhood: little supervision and lots of biking, rope-swinging and playing in the area’s fields and glens. The couple quickly settled into their bucolic new surroundings. Wick began fixing leaks in the barn. Rathmann loved watching the many animals, including ravens, deer and the occasional gopher, from the large porch. She even trained the resident towhees, small brown birds, to eat seed from her hand. So smitten were they with the wildlife, in fact, that they decided to return their ranch to a wilder state. For nearly a century, this had been dairy country, and the rounded, coastal hills were terraced from decades of grazing. Wick and Rathmann would often come home and find, to their annoyance, cows standing on their porch. The first step they took toward what they imagined would be a more pristine state was to revoke the access enjoyed by the rancher whose cows wandered their property. Within months of the herd’s departure, the landscape began to change. Brush encroached on meadow. Dried-out, uneaten grass hindered new growth. A mysterious disease struck their oak trees. The land seemed to be losing its vitality. “Our vision of wilderness was failing,” Wick told me recently. “Our naïve idea was not working out so well.” Wick was especially bothered by the advance of a prickly, yellow-flowered invasive weed called the woolly distaff thistle. He pulled it, mowed it, doused it with herbicides. But the distaff kept moving into what had been pasture. He thought about renting goats to eat the weeds and brush, but they were too expensive. He even considered introducing wild elk, but the bureaucratic hurdles seemed too onerous. Then Wick and Rathmann met a rangeland ecologist named Jeff Creque. Instead of fighting against what you dislike, Creque suggested, focus on cultivating what you want. Squeeze out weeds by fostering conditions that favor grasses. Creque, who spent 25 years as an organic-pear-and-apple farmer in Northern California before earning a Ph.D. in rangeland ecology, also recommended that they bring back the cows. Grasslands and grazing animals, he pointed out, had evolved together. Unlike trees, grasses don’t shed their leaves at the end of the growing season; they depend on animals for defoliation and the recycling of nutrients. The manure and urine from grazing animals fuels healthy growth. If done right, Creque said, grazing could be restorative. This view ran counter to a lot of conservationist thought, as well as a great deal of evidence. Grazing has been blamed for turning vast swaths of the world into deserts. But from Creque’s perspective, how you graze makes all the difference. If the ruminants move like wild buffalo, in dense herds, never staying in one place for too long, the land benefits from the momentary disturbance. If you simply let them loose and then round them up a few months later — often called the “Columbus method” — your land is more likely to end up hard-packed and barren. Wick was persuaded. He began preparing for the cows’ return. He dug wells for water, pounded in steel posts and strung nonbarbed wire. He even bought a molasses lick to supplement the animals’ diet of dry thatch. He didn’t want medicated livestock excreting drugs that might harm the worms and insects living in his soil — most cows are routinely dewormed — so he tracked down a herd of untreated cows and borrowed them for the summer of 2005. The cows beat back the encroaching brush. Within weeks of their arrival, new and different kinds of grass began sprouting. Shallow-rooted annuals, which die once they’re chewed on, gave way to deep-rooted perennials, which can recover after moderate grazing. By summer’s end, the cows, which had arrived shaggy and wild-eyed after a winter spent near the sea, were fat with shiny coats. When Wick returned the herd to its owner that fall, collectively it had gained about 50,000 pounds. Wick needed to take an extra trip with his trailer to cart the cows away. That struck him as remarkable. The land seemed richer than before, the grass lusher. Meadowlarks and other animals were more abundant. Where had that additional truckload of animal flesh come from? Creque had an answer for him. The carbohydrates that fattened the cows had come from the atmosphere, by way of the grass they ate. Grasses, he liked to say, were like straws sipping carbon from the air, bringing it back to earth. Creque’s quiet observation stuck with Wick and Rathmann. It clearly illustrated a concept that Creque had repeatedly tried to explain to them: Carbon, the building block of life, was constantly flowing from atmosphere to plants into animals and then back into the atmosphere. And it hinted at something that Wick and Rathmann had yet to consider: Plants could be deliberately used to pull carbon out of the sky. Climate change often evokes images of smokestacks, and for good reason: The single largest source of carbon emissions related to human activity is heat and power generation, which accounts for about one-quarter of the carbon we put into the atmosphere. Often overlooked, though, is how we use land, which contributes almost as much. The erosion and degradation of soil caused by plowing, intense grazing and clear-cutting has played a significant role in the atmospheric accumulation of heat-trapping gases. The process is an ancient one. Ice cores from Greenland, which contain air samples trapped thousands of years ago, reveal increases in greenhouse gases that correspond with the rise of farming in Mesopotamia. Since the start of the Industrial Revolution, agricultural practices and animal husbandry have released an estimated 135 gigatons — 135 billion metric tons — of carbon into the atmosphere, according to Rattan Lal, a soil scientist at Ohio State University. Even at current rates, that’s more than a decade’s worth of carbon dioxide emissions from all human sources. The world is warming not only because fossil fuels are being burned, but also because soils, forests and wetlands are being ravaged. In recent years, some scientists have begun to ask whether we can put some of that carbon back into the soil and into living ecosystems, like grasslands and forests. This notion, known as carbon farming, has gained traction as it becomes clear that simply reducing emissions will not sufficiently limit global warming. According to the 2014 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an authority on climate science that operates under the auspices of the United Nations, humankind also needs to remove some of the carbon already in the atmosphere to avoid, say, the collapse of polar glaciers and the inundation of coastal cities worldwide. “We can’t just reduce emissions,” Keith Paustian, a soil scientist at Colorado State University and an author of an earlier I.P.C.C. report, told me. “It’s all hands on deck. Things like soil and land use — everything is important.” Some of the proposed methods to begin this drawdown include scrubbing the air with great air-conditioner-like machines; fertilizing the oceans with iron dust to prompt algal blooms that, when they die, carry captured carbon to the bottom of the sea; capturing and storing the carbon dioxide that results when energy is produced by burning trees and other plants that removed carbon from the atmosphere during their growth; and crushing and spreading certain types of rock, like basalt, that naturally absorb atmospheric carbon. None of these approaches are yet proved or affordable at the scale needed to make a difference. The most obvious hurdle is the additional energy some of them require, which, unless it comes from a free, renewable source, adds more costs. Plants, however, remove carbon from the atmosphere already, require no additional power and grow essentially free. During photosynthesis they harness the sun’s energy to make sugars by combining hydrogen atoms (acquired from water molecules) with carbon atoms (from carbon dioxide), while emitting oxygen as a byproduct. (Lest we forget, the fossil fuels that now power civilization contain carbon removed from the air during photosynthesis millions of years ago.) Every spring, as the Northern Hemisphere greens, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere dips, before rising again the following fall and winter as foliage dies. Some scientists describe this fluctuation as the earth breathing. Nearly all the carbon that enters the biosphere is captured during photosynthesis, and as it moves through life’s web, every organism takes a cut for its own energy needs, releasing carbon dioxide as exhaust. This circular voyage is the short-term carbon cycle. Carbon farming seeks to interfere with this cycle, slowing the release of carbon back into the atmosphere. The practice is often conceptualized and discussed in terms of storing carbon, but really the idea is to change the flow of carbon so that, for a time at least, the carbon leaving a given ecosystem is less than the carbon entering it. Dozens of land-management practices are thought to achieve this feat. Planting or restoring forests, for one: Trees lock up carbon in woody material. Another is adding biochar, a charcoal made from heated organic material, directly to soil. Or restoring certain wetlands that have an immense capacity to hold carbon. (Coal beds are the fossilized remains of ancient marshes and peatlands.) More than one-third of earth’s ice-free surface is devoted to agriculture, meaning that much of it is already managed intensively. Carbon farming’s fundamental conceit is that if we change how we treat this land, we could turn huge areas of the earth’s surface into a carbon sponge. Instead of relying solely on technology to remove greenhouse gases from the air, we could harness an ancient and natural process, photosynthesis, to pump carbon into what’s called the pedosphere, the thin skin of living soil at the earth’s surface. If adopted widely enough, such practices could, in theory, begin to remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, nudging us toward a less perilous climate trajectory than our current one. In a 2016 paper, Pete Smith, a soil scientist at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, and the influential climate scientist James Hansen argued that land-management practices are one of the few affordable options available today for drawing down carbon. “What’s surprising to me is that we’ve not done it sooner,” says Smith, who is also a lead author on a recent U.N. report that explores carbon-dioxide-removal technologies. “This has the potential to make a huge difference.” Otherwise, Hansen told me, we’re leaving the problem to our grandchildren. “That assumption that somehow young people, and people later this century, are going to figure out how to suck it out of the air — that’s a pretty big burden to place on them,” he said. The I.P.C.C. is preparing a special report on climate change and land use, to be finalized in 2019, that will consider in greater detail the potential of sequestering carbon in soil. But for now the biggest international effort to promote carbon farming is a French-led initiative called “four per 1,000.” The proposal aims to increase the amount of carbon in the soil of crop- and rangelands by 0.4 percent per year through a variety of agricultural and forestry practices. These include agroforestry (growing trees and crops together increases carbon retention), no-till agriculture (plowing causes erosion and carbon loss) and keeping farmland covered (bare dirt bleeds carbon). Doing so, the French argue, could completely halt the buildup of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Few experts I spoke to think the impact would be quite that grand; Pete Smith, for example, estimates that soil could, at the most, store just 13 percent of annual carbon-dioxide emissions at current levels. “I appreciate that everyone wants to save the planet,” he told me, “but we shouldn’t fool ourselves that this is all we need to do.” Even so, the four-per-1,000 goal highlights how a relatively small annual increase in soil carbon could, on a large-enough scale, have a substantial impact. Increasing soil carbon could yield other benefits, too: Improvements in soil fertility, water retention and greater crop resilience would help agriculture adapt to a warming world. More soil carbon would also reduce the amount of fertilizer needed, decreasing emissions of the powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, a byproduct of excess nitrogen fertilization. It would be profoundly appropriate if agriculture, whose modern practices have themselves contributed to climate change, could become part of its solution. Farming, responsible for the birth of civilization, could now help save it. In 2007, at Jeff Creque’s behest, John Wick got in touch with Whendee Silver, an ecologist at the University of California, Berkeley. Letting cows graze on his property had certainly made the land look healthier, he told Silver. But he and Creque wanted to know: Had it put carbon in the ground? And if so, was it possible to measure how much? Silver was skeptical that she could measure what was likely to amount to very small changes in his land’s soil carbon. The endeavor seemed akin to looking for cups of water added to a swimming pool. But she did sketch out a way to arrive at a definitive answer. When Wick offered to underwrite such a study, she warned him that he might not like the results. She wasn’t just going to tell him what he wanted to hear. “That’s when I knew I had to work with her,” Wick recalls. Silver agreed to the project, which she began that year. Seeking baseline values for the carbon concentrations in the soil, she and her students collected samples from different rangelands in Marin and Sonoma Counties. The samples with the most carbon, it turned out, came from current and former dairy farms. What distinguished these operations, she learned, was that they often sprayed manure onto their pastures; this was done both to fertilize the land and dispose of waste. Apparently, how soil was treated could very much affect its carbon content — a surprise. The larger implication was that people could potentially “grow” soil carbon deliberately. But how quickly could they do so? Silver found an answer, in part, by looking for nuclear fallout. In the mid-20th century, radioactive carbon isotopes were spewed into the atmosphere as a result of aboveground nuclear tests. Plants around the world absorbed those isotopes during photosynthesis, effectively turning them into a time stamp. Wherever that carbon shows up, it must have arrived there relatively recently. On dairy farms, Silver found the isotopes a full three feet below the surface. This was another surprise. Conventional wisdom holds that it takes perhaps hundreds of years for carbon-rich topsoil to accumulate. On these dairy farms, however, atmospheric carbon had pushed deep into the earth in a matter of decades. Wick wanted to know if he could deliberately replicate this process on his ranch — but without manure, which, as it decomposes, can release potent greenhouse gases like methane and nitrous oxide. The former traps about 30 times as much heat as carbon dioxide, the latter 300 times as much. As a carbon-farming tool, manure might be self-defeating. Jeff Creque, a onetime organic farmer, had a suggestion: Why not use compost? Compost can contain manure, but whereas manure alone can release nitrogen as nitrous oxide, the nitrogen in compost becomes locked up in complex molecules. At least in theory, that limits the escape of a powerful greenhouse gas. In 2008, Wick, Silver and Creque spread several semi trucks full of the stuff, purchased from a composting plant near Sacramento, onto Wick’s ranch and on another ranch in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. In total, it amounted to about half an inch spread over three acres. After three years, Wick was disappointed to discover that grazing on its own wasn’t leading to carbon sequestration. In fact, the soil lost carbon in untreated control plots. No one knows precisely why, but grasslands throughout California are bleeding carbon. European settlers introduced shallow-rooted annual grasses to the state, which partly displaced deeper-rooted perennial grasses. So carbon put into the ground long ago by deep-rooted grasses may now be seeping out. That’s what made the treated plots so remarkable. They had the same history and were exposed to the same conditions, but instead of losing carbon, they absorbed it — at a rate equivalent to nearly 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide per acre per year. That’s roughly equal to your car’s emissions if you drove from Miami to Seattle. Silver had thought that the compost would simply break down, releasing its carbon back into the atmosphere or, worse, produce nitrous oxide. But those emissions never occurred; moreover, judging by its chemical signature, most of the carbon moving into the soil came from the air, not the compost. The compost appeared to help the plants draw more carbon from the atmosphere than they otherwise would have. When it comes to mitigating climate change, soil scientists are most interested in what Silver calls occluded carbon — organic material, often in the form of dead microbes, trapped in clods of dirt. This type of carbon can potentially stay locked away for centuries. (Another carbon type, called labile carbon, continuously cycles among the atmosphere, plants and organisms in the soil.) It was precisely this more durable carbon, Silver discovered, that increased in the treated plots. Her findings corresponded with a shift in recent decades in scientists’ understanding of how soil carbon forms. Previously they emphasized how dead organic material had to physically work its way into the soil. But the newer model stressed the importance of living plants. Their rootlets are constantly dying, depositing carbon underground, where it’s less likely to go airborne. And perhaps more important, as plants pull carbon from the air, their roots inject some of it into the soil, feeding microorganisms and fungi called mycorrhiza. An estimated 12,000 miles of hyphae, or fungal filaments, are found beneath every square meter of healthy soil. Some researchers refer to this tangled, living matrix as the “world wood web.” Living plants increase soil carbon by directly nourishing soil ecosystems. In the years that followed, Silver’s analyses of soil cores indicated that the treated land kept taking in carbon. Computer simulations suggest that it will continue to do so for decades. It also retained more moisture and grew about 50 percent more grass. One dose of compost ignited what Silver calls a state change: The plants and the soil — and everything that inhabited it — moved toward a new equilibrium in which the soil ecosystem pulled in and retained greater amounts of carbon. Silver began publishing her findings in scientific journals in 2010. Her second paper, written with her postdoc Marcia DeLonge and the graduate student Rebecca Ryals, offered a remarkable bit of extrapolation. California has about 56 million acres of rangeland, the single largest type of land use in the state. If compost made with manure was applied to just 5 percent of that area, they calculated, it would offset emissions from about 80 percent of the state’s agricultural sector — all the cows raised, crops grown, fertilizer applied and tractors driven in California. Much of that offset came from diverting manure from festering lagoons — where it releases methane and nitrous oxide into the atmosphere — into compost, a one-time benefit. But the ongoing drawdown of carbon dioxide from enhanced grass growth could be important, too. If you treated 41 percent of the state’s rangeland, Silver told me, carbon pumped into the earth by photosynthesis might render the entire agricultural sector of the world’s sixth-largest economy carbon-neutral for years to come. The soil-improving practices that Wick, Silver and Creque stumbled into have much in common with another movement known as regenerative agriculture. Its guiding principle is not just to farm sustainably — that implies mere maintenance of what might, after all, be a degraded status quo — but to farm in such a way as to improve the land. The movement emphasizes soil health and, specifically, the buildup of soil carbon. This happy coincidence is one reason that carbon-farming advocates repeatedly describe their project as a “win-win.” Society could theoretically remove carbon from the atmosphere and store it in the earth, and at the same time enhance the fortunes of farmers and the overall stability of the nation’s food supply. Farmers’ obsession with soil health isn’t new, of course. It has been a preoccupation for ages. But modern, conventional agriculture has largely relied on synthetic fertilizer to compensate for losses in natural fertility. And while fertilizers help plants grow, some evidence suggests that they can, in excess, accelerate the loss of carbon from the soil. An influx of nutrients may feed precisely those microbes that release carbon back into the atmosphere. Plants may also excrete less carbon into the earth when bathed in synthetic fertilizers, causing the ancient relationship among plant roots, soil fungi and microbes — the symbiosis that increases soil carbon — to fray. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, which was founded in response to the Dust Bowl crisis of the 1930s, has promoted the fostering of soil carbon as an important farming practice. But one of the more remarkable aspects of the regenerative-agriculture movement is that it has been driven largely by farmers themselves. Its proponents fret over soil carbon not necessarily because the N.R.C.S. tells them to, or because they worry about the planet’s fate. They have discovered that doing so can help their bottom line. Darin Williams is one such farmer. He lives near Waverly, Kan., with his wife, Nancy, in a tidy, gray-painted house with a stone chimney. A life-size plastic deer sits on his front lawn, run through with arrows; he uses it for target practice to sharpen his hunting skills. He’s a big man with a baby face and a mischievous squint. When he drove me around his farm last October in his red “one-tonner” pickup truck, he talked incessantly about soil. For nearly 20 years, Williams worked as a contractor, building houses in Kansas City. But work dried up after the financial crisis hit in 2007. Williams decided to return to the family farm near Waverly, an area of gently rolling plains, and give farming a try. His family had farmed some when he was a teenager before leasing the land to tenants for years, and he knew it was difficult to make ends meet. But he was inspired by an article about a North Dakota rancher and farmer named Gabe Brown, who claimed to have developed, through trial and error, a more efficient and cost-effective way to farm. The gist of Brown’s argument was that if you focus on the health of the soil and not on yield, eventually you come out ahead, not necessarily because you grow more corn or wheat per acre but because the reduction in spending on fertilizer and other inputs lets you produce each bushel of grain more cheaply. Williams decided to follow Brown’s prescription. “If after three years, I’m bankrupt, I’ll admit it was a bad joke,” Williams remembers thinking. Seven years later, his gamble seems to have paid off. He started with 60 acres, now farms about 2,000 and, when I visited last fall, had just purchased an additional 200. In one of his fields, we walked down a lane he had mowed through his warm-weather cover crops — plants grown not to be harvested, but to enrich the soil — which towered over us, reaching perhaps eight feet. They included sorghum, a canelike grass with red-tinted tassels spilling from the tops, mung beans and green-topped daikon radishes low to the ground. Each plant was meant to benefit the earth in a different way. The long radishes broke it up and drew nutrients toward the surface; tall grasses like sorghum produced numerous fine rootlets, adding organic material to the land; legumes harbored bacteria that put nitrogen into the soil. His 120-strong herd of British white cattle — he introduced livestock in 2013 — would eventually eat through the field, turning the plants into cow patties and enriching the soil further. Then he would plant his cash crops. “Had I not found this way to farm,” he told me, “we would not be farming.” A mat of dead vegetation — from cover crops, cash-crop residue and dung — covered Williams’s fields. The mulch, along with his cover crops, inhibited weeds from becoming established, a major concern for conventional farmers, because so many weeds have evolved resistance to herbicides. “I don’t lie awake at night wondering how I’m going to kill weeds,” Williams said. Williams doesn’t till his fields. By minimizing soil disturbance, no-till farming prevents erosion, helps retain moisture and leaves the soil ecosystem — worms, fungi, roots and more — mostly intact. At one of his soybean fields, Williams showed me how this translated to soil with “structure.” “See how that crumbles into a cottage-cheese look?” he said, massaging a fistful of earth. Small clods fell through his fingers. “That’s what you want.” Worm holes riddled the dirt, giving it a spongelike quality that was critical, he said, for absorbing rain and preventing runoff. Weather patterns seemed to be changing, he noted. Rain used to arrive in numerous light storms. Now fewer storms came, but they were more intense. “We have to be able to capture rain and store it,” he said. By focusing on soil health, Williams says he has reduced his use of herbicides by 75 percent and fertilizers by 45 percent. He doesn’t use pesticides — he relies instead on beneficial insects for pest control — and he saves money by not buying expensive genetically modified, herbicide-resistant seed. He estimates that he produces a bushel of soybeans for about 20 percent less than his conventionally farming neighbors. Last fall, he claims, his yields ranked among the highest in the county. While doing all this, he has so far raised the amount of soil organic matter, a rough predictor of soil carbon concentrations, from around 2 percent to 3.5 percent in some fields. Gabe Brown, for his part, says he has more than tripled his soil carbon since the 1990s. And an official with the U.S.D.A.’s Agricultural Research Service confirmed to me that the amount of carbon in Brown’s soil — what his farming has pulled from the atmosphere — was between two and three times as high as it was in his neighbors’ land. The successes of Brown and Williams suggest that farmers can increase carbon in the soil while actually reducing their overall expenses. This could be vital, because in order for carbon farming to have an impact on the climate, as much land as possible, including both crop- and rangeland, will have to be included in the effort. Critics of regenerative agriculture say that it can’t be adopted broadly and intensively enough to matter — or that if it can, the prices of commodities might be affected unfavorably. Mark Bradford, a professor of soils and ecosystem ecology at Yale, questions what he sees as a quasi-religious belief in the benefits of soil carbon. The recommendation makes sense intuitively, he told me. But the extent to which carbon increases crop yield hasn’t been quantified, making it somewhat “faith-based.” William Schlesinger, an emeritus soil scientist at Duke, points out that “regenerative” practices might inadvertently cause emissions to rise elsewhere. If you stop tilling to increase soil carbon, for example, but use more herbicides because you have more weeds, then you probably haven’t changed your overall emissions profile, he says. He thinks the climate-mitigation potential of carbon farming has been greatly oversold. Williams has reduced his herbicide use, not increased it, but Schlesinger’s broader point — about the need for a careful overall accounting of greenhouse gases — is important. Williams, Brown and others like them aren’t focused on climate change; no one really knows if the carbon they put in the ground more than offsets the methane produced by their cows, for example. What they do demonstrate is that augmenting soil carbon while farming is not only possible, but also beneficial, even in a business sense. And that makes the prospect of rolling out these practices on a larger scale much easier to imagine. The carbon-farming idea is gathering momentum at a time when national climate policy is backsliding. The Trump administration has reversed various Obama-era regulations meant to combat or adapt to climate change, including the Clean Power Plan, which required power plants to reduce their carbon emissions, and a rule instructing the federal government to consider sea-level rise and other effects of a changing climate when building new roads, bridges and other infrastructure. In the absence of federal leadership on climate — and as emissions continue to rise globally, shrinking the time available to forestall worst-case outcomes — state and local governments (as well as nonprofits) have begun to look into carbon farming. Last year, Hawaii passed legislation meant to keep it aligned with the Paris agreement, which President Trump has said he will abandon; the state has also created a task force to research carbon farming. The New York state assemblywoman Didi Barrett introduced legislation that would make tax credits available to farmers who increase soil carbon, presumably through methods like those employed by Darin Williams and Gabe Brown. A bill to educate farmers about soil has been proposed in Massachusetts. And in Maryland, legislation focused on soil health passed in 2017. Other carbon-farming projects are in the works in Colorado, Arizona and Montana. But it is California, already in the vanguard on climate-mitigation efforts, that has led the way on carbon farming. By 2050, the state aims to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions to 20 percent of what they were in 1990. Nearly half its 58 counties have farmers and ranchers at various stages of developing and implementing carbon-farming plans. San Francisco, which already has the largest urban composting program in the country, hopes to become a model carbon-farming metropolis. Cities don’t have much room to plant trees or undertake other practices that remove carbon from the atmosphere, says Deborah Raphael, the director of San Francisco’s Department of the Environment. But they can certainly produce plenty of compost. “If we can show other cities how doable it is to get green waste out of landfills, we can prove the concept,” Raphael told me. “We like to say that San Francisco rehearses the future.” Many of California’s carbon-farming efforts owe a debt to Wick, Creque and Silver. In 2008, they founded the Marin Carbon Project, a consortium of ranchers, scientists and land managers. The goal is to develop science-based carbon-farming practices and to help establish the incentives needed to encourage California farmers to adopt them. Silver continues to publish her findings in respected journals. Creque also started a nonprofit, the Carbon Cycle Institute, that assists farmers and ranchers in making carbon-farming plans. Wick has thrown himself into the policy realm, hiring a lobbyist in Sacramento to push a carbon-farming agenda. (In 2014, he even testified before Congress, outlining the project’s discoveries and explaining how compost could increase soil carbon on public lands. He deliberately mentioned “climate” only once.) Educating policymakers matters because, as Torri Estrada, executive director of the Carbon Cycle Institute, points out, carbon-mitigation efforts that focus on agriculture can be much cheaper per ton of carbon avoided than the flashier energy-efficiency and renewable-energy projects that usually get most of the attention. The major obstacle to their implementation, he says, is that government officials don’t understand or know about them. California’s Healthy Soils Initiative, which Wick helped shape, explicitly enlists agriculture in the fight against climate change. In principle, that means this carbon farmers can receive money from the state’s climate-mitigation funds not just for compost but also for 34 other soil-improving practices already approved by the Natural Resources Conservation Service. That’s important because the compost needed to cover just a few acres can cost thousands of dollars. Wick has also tried to tap federal funding. Once N.R.C.S. scientists vet Silver’s work, a compost amendment could become the service’s 35th recommendation. As a result, farm bill money, which farmers receive to subsidize food production, could help finance carbon farming done according to Wick’s protocol — not to fight climate change explicitly (which is now seen as politicized), but to bolster the health of soil (which isn’t). As a carbon-farming tool, compost bears some notable advantages — namely, it works both preventively and correctively. Composting prevents emissions from the starter material — manure, food scraps — that, if allowed to decompose, might emit potent greenhouse gases. (About one-fifth of United States methane emissions comes from food and other organic material decomposing in dumps.) By enhancing plant growth, it also aids in removing carbon from the atmosphere, a corrective process. And because the carbon in nearly all organic material was originally pulled from the atmosphere during photosynthesis, compost that enters the soil represents the storage of carbon removed from the air earlier — the grass eaten by cows that became manure, or the trees that became wood chips — and at a different location. That, too, is corrective. Calla Rose Ostrander, Wick’s right-hand person at the Marin Carbon Project, told me that the project’s greater goal is to completely reframe how we think about waste, to see it as more than a nuisance — to recognize it as a resource, a tool that can help us garden our way out of the climate problem. Before the modern era, farmers had no choice but to return human and animal waste to the fields. (Wick is looking into the possibility of composting human waste as well; the end product is called humanure.) In a sense, Wick and Ostrander seek to resurrect these ancient practices and, with the aid of modern science, to close the loop among livestock, plants, air and soil — and between cities and the agricultural land that feeds them. What seems to most impress experts about the Marin Carbon Project is the quality of Silver’s research. Eric Toensmeier, the author of “The Carbon Farming Solution” and a lecturer at Yale, says that the project figured out a new way to increase carbon storage on the semiarid grasslands that cover so much of the world. Jason Weller, the former head of the Natural Resources Conservation Service, told me that “the level of science investment is out of the ordinary, or extraordinary, for a group that is really self-started.” Weller added that the agency’s scientists still needed to vet the research, which they are in the midst of doing. In late 2016 the agency oversaw the application of compost to different California regions — inland, Southern, Northern — to see if land in various conditions would, like Wick’s ranch, suck up atmospheric carbon. But the group also has critics. “I’m very skeptical of their results and their claims,” William Horwath, a soil scientist at the University of California, Davis, told me. He wants to see Silver’s experiments replicated. This is the project’s major weakness: Its big idea is based almost entirely on extrapolation from a few acres in California. At this point, it’s impossible to say whether compost can cause land to become a carbon sponge in all climates and conditions, and for how long treated grassland will continue to take in and retain its carbon. Cows, a flash point in any discussion about climate change, may also present problems. Ruminants burp methane, and while carbon farming does not require their presence, some argue that merely accepting them on the land undermines the goal of reaching a carbon-neutral or -negative future. Livestock emissions account for almost half the heat-trapping gases associated with agriculture, so an obvious way to reduce emissions is to decrease the number of cows on the planet. Instead of dumping compost on rangeland, says Ian Monroe, a lecturer on energy and climate at Stanford University, why not allow forests cleared for pasture to regrow, and change people’s eating habits so they include less meat? Criticism is directed at compost too. The stuff requires energy to produce; huge machines are required to shred the material and keep it aerated. And it’s unclear if compost, like synthetic fertilizer, can cause nitrogen pollution when put on the land, or how much greenhouse gas composting itself generates. (As long as compost mounds are regularly aerated to prevent low-oxygen conditions, composting is thought to produce few emissions.) Organic material from municipal sources can contain bits of plastic and glass, which no one wants on their fields. Manure might carry seeds of invasive plants. (Silver has seen no evidence of this.) Spreading compost on public rangeland could disrupt plant communities, squeezing out species adapted to conditions of scarcity. And in any carbon-farming scheme, who will monitor and verify that far-flung stretches of land are really absorbing and storing the carbon as they’re supposed to? Horwath considers the amount of compost used in Silver’s research — about 10 times the usual application, he estimates — to be unrealistically high for practical use. “It seems an inordinately large amount to apply to any system,” he told me. And given what he sees as the many unknowns in Silver’s research, that compost would be put to better use on cropland where, he says, scientists know with greater certainty that it could improve water retention and the efficiency of fertilizer. Then there’s the problem of supply. Demand for San Francisco’s compost, which mostly goes to vineyards in California’s wine country, already outstrips what’s available. But Wick thinks more starter material shouldn’t be hard to find: Americans throw out between 30 and 40 percent of all the food they buy, sending it to landfills where it rots and generates greenhouse gases. Silver has calculated that there’s enough organic waste material in California to treat one-quarter of its rangeland every few decades. Still, given the energy requirements, the logistical headaches and the cost, skeptics question whether spreading compost across extensive portions of the world’s surface — including conflict zones in the Sahel or Central Asia — is really feasible. Even if it is, soils probably can’t soak up carbon indefinitely. If they have a saturation point, increases in carbon will eventually stop when that moment is reached. And because soil degradation can cause the release of whatever carbon it holds, treated lands would have to be well cared for in perpetuity. On a cool autumn day at Wick and Rathmann’s ranch house, Wick fielded phone calls while I wandered around the cluttered, semicircular room that served as his office and meeting space. A whiteboard displayed scribbles from a presentation on the carbon cycle. Coils of warmly hued yarn hung from the doorways. They came via a local nonprofit dedicated to climate-friendly ranching practices called Fibershed. And draped over a chair was a T-shirt bearing what might as well have been Wick’s battle cry: “seq-C,” it read, punny shorthand for “sequester carbon.” Under that it read, “Doing it in the dirt.” Down the road, he showed me a composting facility that Creque dreamed up initially. He and Wick hoped it would serve as a self-sustaining prototype. “Anything that has ever been alive can be composted,” he told me, surveying the 10-foot-tall piles of chicken droppings and feathers, horse bedding (manure and straw) and shredded trees. A tractor mixed woody refuse with animal waste — to get the composting process started requires the right mix of carbon- and nitrogen-rich materials. (That’s why some backyard composters recommend urinating on the pile to kick things off: Urine is rich in nitrogen.) Across the lot, a hulking machine straddled rows of steaming black compost, turning them with a metal spinner. Compost has to be regularly “fluffed,” or aerated, Wick explained, to prevent anaerobic microbes from producing methane and nitrous oxide. The manure piles were acrid, but the compost itself had a rich and pleasant odor, like cigars. Wick hopes that facilities like this will someday dot the American agricultural landscape. The idea is to manufacture compost close to both its source material and the place where it will be used, obviating the emissions from carting heavy materials over long distances. The plant also embodied Wick’s contention that composting can help farm carbon and manage waste at the same time. The challenge of affordably creating millions of tons of compost and applying it to great expanses of land is formidable. But there is a pleasing symmetry to the idea that we could use waste to bring the excess carbon in the atmosphere back to Earth, all while making the world lusher and more bountiful. When I first got in touch with Wick, in late 2016, he greeted me with a question: “Do you know how the earth’s atmosphere was oxygenated?” He was referring to a period 2.3 billion years ago when oxygen, produced by photosynthetic organisms, began building up in the atmosphere, prompting a mass extinction and clearing the way for multicellular life (and, eventually, humans). “Cyanobacteria?” I guessed. “Very good,” he said. “This might work.” Evidently I had passed some sort of scientific literacy test. But his bigger point was that living things — and particularly photosynthetic life — had always been the great engineers of the planet’s climate. Now, he believed, we could use that fact to our advantage. That sort of cosmic thinking about the planet and its history is ultimately what makes Wick’s vision so compelling and potentially powerful. The essential insight is one often overlooked when we talk about climate change: The element that threatens to smother civilization is also, in different forms, the fundamental building block of life. To prevent carbon from causing misery and destruction, perhaps we just need to change its location. Perhaps we can find a way to pull it from the air and restore it to the earth.
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Commented on post by Julian BondWell that's awkward. Being reminded of Mark Fisher. RIP, you old curmudgeon. — It's late 2014 and there are cultural critics still arguing that creativity stopped in 2003, using examples from 2004 and 2006. Arctic Monkeys vs Burial as symptom vs diagnosis? That's * so * last decade! http://crackmagazine.net/music/mark-fisher-interviewed/ I think we fairly desperately need a Post-Retromania and Post-Hauntology in pop cultural analysis. ps. He's got a book out. How drole. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ghosts-My-Life-Depression-Hauntology/dp/1780992262/ref=sr_1_1
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit"you can't argue with The People's Willy". Or The Willy of the People — The Guardian cartoon: you can't argue with the people's willy.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliegehttps://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — The EU has thrown Theresa May a banana by asking how her "custom partnership" idea would actually work in practice. That partnership is the idea that all widgets entering the UK are somehow tracked, in case they enter the EU via the UK, so that then the UK reimburses the EU according to the tariffs the EU usually imposes. (Apart from the "tracking every little screw entering the country" this is a great idea, until you start thinking about flour entering the UK and frozen pizzas leaving towards the EU. Who is going to track what here?) I think this is just the EU being a bit nice to May, so that she can face down Boris Johnson, who has positioned himself against such a partnership. Here, Johnson is actually not wrong, but the EU much prefers to deal with May than with the raving mad lunatics that might follow her if she gets ousted. Its like Afghanistan. You rather prop up an utterly corrupt government in Kabul with some semblance of order, because the alternative is dealing with religious crackpots.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege+Engrumpled Curmudgeon I'm sure you know this, but I don't see how you could get a parliament with a "No To Brexit" majority when both major parties think campaigning on "No To Brexit" is political suicide. What you're actually asking for is for both major parties to break into small pieces and then reform as the Remain and Leave parties. Like some competing slime moulds in a lightless cave, deep underground. There was a chance that Labour could fight and win on a Remain ticket but that was last year. It's the referendum that needs destroying and remaking. Then both parties can claim that the "will 'o' the people" (Will-o'-the-wisp) has changed. "Game of Tyrones". Now that is perfect. — The EU has thrown Theresa May a banana by asking how her "custom partnership" idea would actually work in practice. That partnership is the idea that all widgets entering the UK are somehow tracked, in case they enter the EU via the UK, so that then the UK reimburses the EU according to the tariffs the EU usually imposes. (Apart from the "tracking every little screw entering the country" this is a great idea, until you start thinking about flour entering the UK and frozen pizzas leaving towards the EU. Who is going to track what here?) I think this is just the EU being a bit nice to May, so that she can face down Boris Johnson, who has positioned himself against such a partnership. Here, Johnson is actually not wrong, but the EU much prefers to deal with May than with the raving mad lunatics that might follow her if she gets ousted. Its like Afghanistan. You rather prop up an utterly corrupt government in Kabul with some semblance of order, because the alternative is dealing with religious crackpots.
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Commented on post by Sisco Vanilla in Mixology 🍸Cocchi needs a mention. And Spanish Vermouths like Lustau — Often times many people think of Vermouth as just being in ingredient that you add to a cocktail. Not so folks. Vermouths are of standalone quality and should be enjoyed on their own merits. This article from Gear Patrol highlights some of the best Vermouths on the market for a variety of uses. Check it out. #Vermouth #VermouthBianco #VermouthRosso #Wine #FortifiedWine #Cocktail #Cocktails #Coctel #Cocteles #Cocteleria #SiscoVanilla #SiscoVanillaIsStepping
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt would solve a lot of problems if you needed an ID card to cross the M25. We could call it an "Oystercard" to celebrate being shucked open with a security knife. For those that didn't want to queue to touch in, there could be a phone app that automatically logged your transit in and out of the London Free Trade Zone. Commercial vehicles would be automatically logged by the ULEZ ANPR as primary ID, backed up with additional pre-registration of goods each marked with an RFID and barcode. Special taxes (or tax avoidance benefits) could be levied during travel into the two parts of "Zone Zero". viz: The City of London and the Isle of Dogs. What an excellent idea. Of course it would also require CCTV and enforcement of hard borders across the various footpaths, bridlepaths and minor roads that cross the M25 without authorised intersections. Otherwise there might be a problem with illegal immigrants, foxes, badgers, rabbits and hedgehogs trying to tunnel through the invisible security fence. — A no-go while the DUP still props up the UK government, as a Hongkong-style solution would effectively move the Irish border into the Irish sea. Still, one can dream. Maybe we can have a Hongkong-style arrangement for London and the South?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitMaybe this was the plan all along? Wait until the final planned elections before Brexit and then allow Labour's position to shift strongly towards Brexit-Min and Remain. Except perhaps not by forcing rebellion. — And the cold war inside the Labour Party just got hotter. On Europe, both big parties in the UK could perish. Funny.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeDid somebody say, "PHP" ? — "Don't worry, in 10 years this will all be gone away." COBOL. I'll make a bet and say that in 100 years COBOL will still be around, albeit in some niches only. Like, moving most ATM transactions across a whole continent. So what can we learn from this? I shudder at all the Java out there, for instance. Should we ask for a bit more restraint before companies and affiliated CS departments force new languages into the market? (Found in a private stream.)
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Commented on post by Yonatan Zunger in Politics, Society, and the Law+Benjamin Baugh Pretty sure we're post-future as well — Today in "the death of irony:" https://twitter.com/FoxNewsInsider/status/994018362710634496?s=19
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Commented on post by Zaid El-Hoiydi in SustainabilityFrancis Fukuyama's "The end of history" was in 1992. I think he or somebody needs to write "The End of the Future". Because I think I'm seeing a curious inability in the west to think about the future. Predictions seem to stop at 2100 despite it being within the likely lifetime of people being born now. Even though 2050 is 32 years away, we have trouble imagining even something as close as that. The Collapsniks are expecting the crash to come in the 2020s. Where did the future go? — Two Hellish Curves Is that what sustainability looks like? Clearly not! I keep coming back at those curves, strongly interrelated ones, population and CO2 concentration. Both will largely determine the fate of our species as well as that of countless other species, the collateral damages we cause along with our relentless growth. In ecosystems energy means food which then can sustain life. From the sun on the surface of our planet, or in caves below ground with the chemical energy from nutrients from above, present in stream flows, through percolation or decompositional material for troglodytes, and finally from those incredible deep sea hydrothermal vents. The industrial revolution was definitely the stepping milestone for the outburst of our population when we suddenly began to mass produce food and goods as well as considerably improving our health and thus survival. What these curves should tell us, but only a tiny few will read them that way, is that most of today's population's existence (me and you) owes it to the vast amount of non renewable fossil energy we've turned into CO2 over the last two centuries. If we dare looking a mere 100 years in the future over this 10'000 years range it is pretty sure the CO2 curve will flatten simply because we will run out of stuff to burn and then photosynthesis will very slowly absorb the excess CO2 again, how long? Well, how long did it take for nature to put it underground in the first place? And then, what about us?
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Commented on post by Zaid El-Hoiydi in SustainabilityAs a 60 year old, I'm constantly surprised by predictions of radical changes in 10-30 year timescales. In many ways, 2008-1988 doesn't feel significantly different to me so I have a hard time imagining huge upheavals in societies structures in 2028-2048. I'm not denying that we have seen some amazing things in the last 30 years. eg mobile phones, internet. But there's a huge amount of fundamentals that haven't changed. — Two Hellish Curves Is that what sustainability looks like? Clearly not! I keep coming back at those curves, strongly interrelated ones, population and CO2 concentration. Both will largely determine the fate of our species as well as that of countless other species, the collateral damages we cause along with our relentless growth. In ecosystems energy means food which then can sustain life. From the sun on the surface of our planet, or in caves below ground with the chemical energy from nutrients from above, present in stream flows, through percolation or decompositional material for troglodytes, and finally from those incredible deep sea hydrothermal vents. The industrial revolution was definitely the stepping milestone for the outburst of our population when we suddenly began to mass produce food and goods as well as considerably improving our health and thus survival. What these curves should tell us, but only a tiny few will read them that way, is that most of today's population's existence (me and you) owes it to the vast amount of non renewable fossil energy we've turned into CO2 over the last two centuries. If we dare looking a mere 100 years in the future over this 10'000 years range it is pretty sure the CO2 curve will flatten simply because we will run out of stuff to burn and then photosynthesis will very slowly absorb the excess CO2 again, how long? Well, how long did it take for nature to put it underground in the first place? And then, what about us?
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Commented on post by Zaid El-Hoiydi in Sustainability+Steve S I live in the cucumber capital of the UK! We've been growing salad crops intensively in glasshouses for centuries. So I find nothing particularly odd about the benefits of high density farms on the edge of suburban areas. But crucially, they only make sense for some crops. — Two Hellish Curves Is that what sustainability looks like? Clearly not! I keep coming back at those curves, strongly interrelated ones, population and CO2 concentration. Both will largely determine the fate of our species as well as that of countless other species, the collateral damages we cause along with our relentless growth. In ecosystems energy means food which then can sustain life. From the sun on the surface of our planet, or in caves below ground with the chemical energy from nutrients from above, present in stream flows, through percolation or decompositional material for troglodytes, and finally from those incredible deep sea hydrothermal vents. The industrial revolution was definitely the stepping milestone for the outburst of our population when we suddenly began to mass produce food and goods as well as considerably improving our health and thus survival. What these curves should tell us, but only a tiny few will read them that way, is that most of today's population's existence (me and you) owes it to the vast amount of non renewable fossil energy we've turned into CO2 over the last two centuries. If we dare looking a mere 100 years in the future over this 10'000 years range it is pretty sure the CO2 curve will flatten simply because we will run out of stuff to burn and then photosynthesis will very slowly absorb the excess CO2 again, how long? Well, how long did it take for nature to put it underground in the first place? And then, what about us?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliegehttp://theguardian.com/politics/2018/may/04/sajid-javid-combative-capitalist-and-courtier-of-us-neocons Follower of Ayn Rand. Neocon. American Enterprise Institute (AEI) supporter. Obviously fits right in to the nasty party. And what better place to fit in than as Home Sec in charge of the "Hostile Environment". — Because they are cunts.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitSpelling mistakes, bad kerning, bad punctuation, inappropriate fonts, cost lives. — Stamford Street, London.
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Commented on post by Susan Stone in Climate ChangeBuoy 14 was lost but now is found. Awww! ;) https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,327.msg153140.html#msg153140
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Commented on post by Zaid El-Hoiydi in Sustainability+Steve S Nice SciFi future you have there. Is there a worlds government and a dilithum warp drive as well? 1) Scale problem. Indoor intensive agriculture doesn't work or scale for staples like wheat, soya, corn, rice, potatoes, roots. And you're trading passive solar energy collection via photosynthesis for electricity production. 2) Urbanisation is already happening and increasing. http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/ 1970 urban population 1.3b - 36.5% 2018 4.1b - 54.9% If I called you a Technotopian, would you find that offensive? — Two Hellish Curves Is that what sustainability looks like? Clearly not! I keep coming back at those curves, strongly interrelated ones, population and CO2 concentration. Both will largely determine the fate of our species as well as that of countless other species, the collateral damages we cause along with our relentless growth. In ecosystems energy means food which then can sustain life. From the sun on the surface of our planet, or in caves below ground with the chemical energy from nutrients from above, present in stream flows, through percolation or decompositional material for troglodytes, and finally from those incredible deep sea hydrothermal vents. The industrial revolution was definitely the stepping milestone for the outburst of our population when we suddenly began to mass produce food and goods as well as considerably improving our health and thus survival. What these curves should tell us, but only a tiny few will read them that way, is that most of today's population's existence (me and you) owes it to the vast amount of non renewable fossil energy we've turned into CO2 over the last two centuries. If we dare looking a mere 100 years in the future over this 10'000 years range it is pretty sure the CO2 curve will flatten simply because we will run out of stuff to burn and then photosynthesis will very slowly absorb the excess CO2 again, how long? Well, how long did it take for nature to put it underground in the first place? And then, what about us?
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Commented on post by Zaid El-Hoiydi in Sustainability+Steve S It's all about timescales and one's opinion about when overshoot and collapse kicks in. The UN Demographics group put a huge amount of work into the stats and forecasts and that's where the 10b-2056 figures come from. There's a valid criticism that they don't take enough account of Limits to Growth style resource and pollution constraints so their long term forecasts >30 years out should therefore be taken with a huge pinch of salt. But it seems to me that predicting collapse, crash and burn in <30 years is too pessimistic. The cracks in the system will probably be increasingly obvious though. I do agree that BAU can't keep going indefinitely and certainly not in nice smooth curves out to 2100 and beyond. I've been thinking that since the early 70s. But the axe hasn't fallen yet. — Two Hellish Curves Is that what sustainability looks like? Clearly not! I keep coming back at those curves, strongly interrelated ones, population and CO2 concentration. Both will largely determine the fate of our species as well as that of countless other species, the collateral damages we cause along with our relentless growth. In ecosystems energy means food which then can sustain life. From the sun on the surface of our planet, or in caves below ground with the chemical energy from nutrients from above, present in stream flows, through percolation or decompositional material for troglodytes, and finally from those incredible deep sea hydrothermal vents. The industrial revolution was definitely the stepping milestone for the outburst of our population when we suddenly began to mass produce food and goods as well as considerably improving our health and thus survival. What these curves should tell us, but only a tiny few will read them that way, is that most of today's population's existence (me and you) owes it to the vast amount of non renewable fossil energy we've turned into CO2 over the last two centuries. If we dare looking a mere 100 years in the future over this 10'000 years range it is pretty sure the CO2 curve will flatten simply because we will run out of stuff to burn and then photosynthesis will very slowly absorb the excess CO2 again, how long? Well, how long did it take for nature to put it underground in the first place? And then, what about us?
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Commented on post by Zaid El-Hoiydi in Sustainability+Steve S Population growth in percentage terms is reducing. But that's because we're in the linear middle part of the S Curve. +80m/yr for 5 decades now. And it's now 7.6b. If Business As Usual keeps going it will be 10b in ~ 2056. The main CO2 absorption in geological time is rock weathering. Roughly: 10GtC/Yr turned into 30GtCO2/yr until the 1TtC of easily accessible fossil carbon is all gone. In one last #terafart . Leading to a temperature rise of at least 5C. And 200k years before CO2 and temperatures drop back again to pre-industrial levels. — Two Hellish Curves Is that what sustainability looks like? Clearly not! I keep coming back at those curves, strongly interrelated ones, population and CO2 concentration. Both will largely determine the fate of our species as well as that of countless other species, the collateral damages we cause along with our relentless growth. In ecosystems energy means food which then can sustain life. From the sun on the surface of our planet, or in caves below ground with the chemical energy from nutrients from above, present in stream flows, through percolation or decompositional material for troglodytes, and finally from those incredible deep sea hydrothermal vents. The industrial revolution was definitely the stepping milestone for the outburst of our population when we suddenly began to mass produce food and goods as well as considerably improving our health and thus survival. What these curves should tell us, but only a tiny few will read them that way, is that most of today's population's existence (me and you) owes it to the vast amount of non renewable fossil energy we've turned into CO2 over the last two centuries. If we dare looking a mere 100 years in the future over this 10'000 years range it is pretty sure the CO2 curve will flatten simply because we will run out of stuff to burn and then photosynthesis will very slowly absorb the excess CO2 again, how long? Well, how long did it take for nature to put it underground in the first place? And then, what about us?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThe media is trying so hard to portray Labour's results as disastrous and the end of Corbyn. But maybe the question is not why didn't Labour do better but why didn't the Tories do even worse. Those UKIP votes almost certainly went back to Tory and yet they still managed to lose councillors and councils. And they were still propped up by people who vote and who will always vote Tory. And it's not just the media. There's a centrist, pro-Europe segment of the Labour Party that seems determined to undermine the party as well. And the party still hasn't worked out how to deal with the anti-semitism story. Again, this is internal as much as external. There are MPs and activists attacking their own party and fuelling the story. — The Economist declares Corbymania for dead, but we all know how we should treat such pronounciations. Nevertheless: the Tories are comically inept at present, so any half-competent opposition should be wiping the floor with them. But Labour doesn't. So whats going on? Corbyn is too left for the country, writes the Economist. Indicating that a more centrist figure is needed.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitA pair of Guardian comments today. Can Corbyn now please resign? He is passively allowing Brexit to take place and will help to usher in a post-Brexit Ress-Mogg government : thanks Corby! "He is passively allowing Brexit to take place" Political suicide to openly oppose it. The support for stopping Brexit isn't what you imagine it to be. - Both parties are now openly self-destructive. But mainly Labour. - Labour aren't very anti-semitic. But they are incapable of dealing with the charge of being anti-semitic. And there's a large section of Labour that are Blair-ite, pro-Israel who are quite prepared to destroy Labour to get rid of what they see as the Corbyn, Pro-Palestine wing. And charges of anti-semitism are a powerful weapon to do that. Things like failing to win Barnet are seen as a small price to pay. - Labour aren't very pro-leave. But Labour will be officially pro-leave for the sake of political power. Meanwhile, nobody speaks for the 48. — A self-identified Labour voter who ain't gonna vote Labour anymore. Labour under Jeremy Corbyn is blindly following the agenda of the most ghastly Tory government in history in pursuing the most suicidally stupid and unnecessary political endeavour since – well since ever. By enabling Brexit the Labour party hierachy is ignoring the will of most of its members and supporters and doing the 48% of largely progressive and outward looking Britons, who voted Remain, a massive disservice. I would disagree on the use of the word "blindly". Corbyn knows exactly what he is doing. The problem is that there are two possible explanations. Maybe Corbyn is a (reluctant/secret) Remainer, but is afraid of losing northern Labour voters, who are inclined to be Brexiters. So thats just old-fashioned electoral calculus: being all kinds of different things to different people. Or maybe Corbyn is just an anti-European Brexiter.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWas hoping Ilford had declared but not yet. — Today are local elections, and in Ilford the Tories are giving absolutely everything.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitTo understand Corbyn's position, I think you need to pay close attention to what Momentum are doing. And they are focused on political expediency. It's all about swing constituencies that could be pushed towards Labour. Unfortunately, too many of those are in areas that voted Leave. Even though there is a big numerical majority of Remain voters in Labour overall, all that matters is the small number of Leave voters in these swing constituencies that might be persuaded to switch to Labour. The council elections we've just had are probably the last elections before Brexit becomes completely inevitable. So there's a window of opportunity here for Labour to swing towards an open strategy of Brexit-Min where we stay in the customs union and single market. Without it being seen to be damaging to immediate Labour's attempts to regain political power. Maybe the fact that the previous strategy of ambiguity didn't really work in grabbing council seats gives us an opening to push them harder in this direction. The next one is exactly one year away when another huge batch of Tory Councillors are up for re-election. I hate this and I despair that there's no mainstream party now that represents the 48%. And I hate that Labour is so ineffectual at providing any realistic opposition to the Nasty Party. And I hate that even the relatively sensible parts of the Nasty Party are following the party line and supporting the frankly insane sections that are leading Tory strategy. The lack of clear majority has re-inforced the craziness rather than encouraged rational debate and compromise because every vote is a 3-line-whip. We are so f*ck*r*d. — A self-identified Labour voter who ain't gonna vote Labour anymore. Labour under Jeremy Corbyn is blindly following the agenda of the most ghastly Tory government in history in pursuing the most suicidally stupid and unnecessary political endeavour since – well since ever. By enabling Brexit the Labour party hierachy is ignoring the will of most of its members and supporters and doing the 48% of largely progressive and outward looking Britons, who voted Remain, a massive disservice. I would disagree on the use of the word "blindly". Corbyn knows exactly what he is doing. The problem is that there are two possible explanations. Maybe Corbyn is a (reluctant/secret) Remainer, but is afraid of losing northern Labour voters, who are inclined to be Brexiters. So thats just old-fashioned electoral calculus: being all kinds of different things to different people. Or maybe Corbyn is just an anti-European Brexiter.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexithttps://plus.google.com/legacy_photo_redirect — Tuesday caption contest. Any takers?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitYes, Minister. Your very posture tells me, "Here is a man of true greatness". It's weird isn't it. Too young to remember the Ministry of Silly Walks. Probably too young to remember Yes, Minister. But surely not too young to remember Black Adder. They were all humorous satire, not an instruction manual. — Tuesday caption contest. Any takers?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitAnd the big questions. 1) Did she knowingly lie to parliament? 2) Who else knowingly lied to parliament? Particularly when backing her over the last few days. — One horcrux down. Resigns for being caught lying, mind you, and not for trying to deport UK citizens. So who is next as Home Secretary? Rees-Mogg? Gove? When does May run out of human shields?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit1 down. 28 Cabinet ministers and attendees to go. https://www.gov.uk/government/ministers Amber Rudd really is that horrible. https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2017/05/ambder-rudd-really-horrible/ Now will she get censured for lying to Parliament? It would be good if she has to resign as an MP and there's a by-election. Given the tiny size of her majority. On human shields: Cabinet Reshuffle Now! Boris is quite wide and thick and should be able to stop the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune ... On replacements: Oh good grief! https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/apr/29/the-favourites-to-take-over-from-amber-rudd-as-home-secretary Sajid Javid Michael Gove Jeremy Hunt David Lidington Karen Bradley Wild cards: Dominic Grieve or Nicky Morgan Yes, they really are the "Nasty Party" (c Theresa May 2002, https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2002/oct/08/uk.conservatives2002) — One horcrux down. Resigns for being caught lying, mind you, and not for trying to deport UK citizens. So who is next as Home Secretary? Rees-Mogg? Gove? When does May run out of human shields?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI believe Heseltine encouraged May to install the Brexit gang. 1) to make them fail in public. 2) to punish them and 3) because nobody else would do it. A very risky strategy and extremely painful for everyone involved. Whether it's true or not, reason 3 is probably the real one. And I'm still of the opinion that what you see is what you get from the whole of this cabinet. There's no hidden agenda, they really are this incompetent. But then there's Labour-Corbyn and the rush to support Art50 followed by an almost complete inability to drive the narrative and oppose the Tories on Brexit. We * are * doomed. — "Some on the EU side of negotiations thought it impossible that the UK side should be as under-prepared and aimless as they seemed, and that it must all be a clever ploy." "Pretty sure no one’s floating that theory any more."
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Commented on post by Woozle Hypertwin in Code Dependencyhttp://dlvr.it will collect from G+ and post elsewhere. I kind of think IFTTT can do it as well. There is (php?) code out there to create RSS/Atom from G+ posts. That can often be imported automatically. I wrote my own as a test case to try and understand the G+ API, natch. There's no API to post TO G+ unless you're a special big business case. So G+ has to be the master in the master-slave relationship to other YASNs. But then you get to the point of feeling, "why bother". Why not start from somewhere else in the big "post once, sync everywhere" game. — I think I would be posting here a lot more if I had some automated way of saving my posts over onto one of my own sites. A cross-poster that works with Hubzilla would be just about perfect. I wonder if there's a plugin... I won't even demand that comments come along for the ride, though that would be nice. (n.b. Google Takeout fails on two counts: not automated, doesn't repost.)
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Commented on post by Raphaël Mentrel in Motorcycles - ModifiedHossack-Fior style? Can't really tell from the pics. — FFE: Kawasaki ZX10R TTS Excent
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Commented on post by Raphaël Mentrel in Motorcycles - ModifiedReally can't fault the Sportsmart. Except is the Roadsmart enough for the rest of us? Especially if you have to cross Europe to get to Brno. — Coming next, the front tire (Dunlop SportSmart² MAX) to change my old pair of Pirelli SuperCorsa
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeICE baby, ICE. Stay away from the ICE or you'll get burned. Luckily it's not evenly distributed! I kind of wonder what the owners of the bricked IoT thing do when it no longer works and turning it off and on doesn't help. Just buy another one and repeat the whole process? — A malware that nukes IoT devices is not a malware, but a helpful tool. See it as part of the immune system of the internet. Sometimes some white blood cell is gonna eat a healthy cell just because it looks the wrong way.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege+James Carlson Yup. Me too. ZX81 with custom box and keyboard+16k rampack. To BBC-B which morphed into an Osborne-Compaq transportable clone in a home made case with a 9" B&W monitor and twin disk drives. Led via a cobol course to putting the first 1000 IBM PCs into Merrill Lynch London and building the biggest token ring network in Europe outside IBM. 20 years later I was writing php as a 1-man IT department. :( — RIP, Rick Dickinson. You will have to answer other forces now for your rubber keyboards, and I hope St. Paul will give you a good grilling on this. But you did keep the cost down, and the gods of the marketplace will vouch for you.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitRich people who can afford iPhones can afford an immigration lawyer. What's the problem? It's as easy as shopping at a luxury brand website. Just do it. Do it now. Free cap and sunglasses with a brand name on them to all successful applicants. — Loooool.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliegehttps://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b09yp1gr Great Britain is at a fork in our crossroads. — Cunk on Britain. The United Kingdom of Britain and England. Or something like that. It all started with the Big Bang, and beforehand everything was a bit like Plymouth. (Via +Rhys Taylor .)
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeSpace Junk Clearance Services 'R' Us. — Please meet SJ-17, the Chinese satellite that maneuvres a lot and which got awfully close to at least five different Chinese spacecraft recently. As in, "a couple of hundreds of meters" close, which is danger close as far as satellites go. So whats it doing? Just taking a close look? Refuelling? Pushing and shoving? Mimicking offensive maneuvres? Nobody knows.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThose aren't just bananas. They're fairtrade, small, ripen in the non-plastic compostable bag, ready-to-eat, Waitrose, luxury, gay, space, capitalism, bananas from a sustainable, red-tractor farm, from a country with a great human rights record that buys our arms, owned by a multi-national that contributed to the http://leave.eu Brexit campaign and branded with a made up name that focus groups thought evoked sympathy for nature. — Did someone say "banana republic"?
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeYet again, I'm reminded of this. http://shorttermmemoryloss.com/nor/2014/11/07/all-cameras-are-police-cameras/ And especially with the brief rash of ID machines used as security for getting into clubs and even some bars in the big cities. Put some ID down, like a driving license and take a mug shot. I figured at the time it was training for some facebook/google face recognition AI algorithm. But 4 years later it turns out it was just the cyberstate[1] gathering more data that might come in handy later. [1] Ugh! I need some neologism for the whole Google/Facebook/Police/CA/SecurityServices/ data cloud. — So the UK police is storing 20 million mugshots of people. And there are just about 60 million living in this country. (The joys of facial recognition software and public CCTV.) Now, this is of course highly illegal. So the police has been ordered to scrape their databases and only store images of actual perps. "Can't do that, too expensive." they say. Try that next time you are in court.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitSo as a Brit, living in Britshire, how do I register as an EU Citizen? — "Developing innovative ways to increase registration figures" Oh kindly fuck off.
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Commented on post by Allen Varney+Olman Feelyus Like too many other Google properties an original vision has been screwed with repeatedly. - A competitor for Yahoogroups that never got finished - A Usenet Newsreader that didn't really work - Some all purpose forum software missing some obvious features - A platform for Google support - A series of redesigns - A poor relation of G+ when G+ was going to transform everything Google. In short, it's rubbish! — "Facebook repeats the pattern of Usenet, this time as farce. As a no-holds-barred Wild West sort of social network, Usenet was filled with everything we rightly complain about today. [...] The first thing we should learn from Usenet is the importance of moderation. Fully human moderation at Facebook scale is impossible. With seven billion pieces of content shared per day, even a million moderators would have to scan 7,000 posts each: roughly 4 seconds per post. But we don't need to rely on human moderation. After Usenet's decline, research showed it was possible to classify users as newbies, helpers, leaders, trolls, or flamers, purely by their communications patterns, with only minimal help from the content. This could be the basis for automated moderation assistants that kick suspicious posts over to human moderators, who would then have the final word. [...] "Usenet had no engagement metrics, no means of linking users to stronger content. Islands of hatred certainly existed, but in a network that didn't optimize for engagement, hate groups didn't spread. Neo-Nazis and their like were certainly there, but you had to search them out; you weren't pushed to them. The platform didn't lead you there, trying to maximize your 'engagement.' I can't claim that was some sort of brilliant design on Usenet's part; it just wasn't something anyone thought about at the time. And as a free service, there is a need to maximize profit. Facebook's obsession with engagement is ultimately more dangerous than their sloppy handling of personal data. 'Engagement' allows -- indeed, encourages -- hate groups to metastasize. "Engagement metrics harm free speech, another ideal carried to the modern internet from the Usenet world. But in an 'attention economy,' where the limiting factor is attention, not speech, we have to rethink what those values mean. I've said Usenet ended in a 'whimper' -- but what drained the energy away? The participants who contributed real value just got tired of wading through the spam and fighting off the trolls. They went elsewhere. Usenet's history gives us a warning: Good speech was crowded off the stage by bad speech. [...] "If we're to put an end to the farce, we need to understand what it means to enable speech, rather than to drown it out. Abandoning 'engagement' is part of the solution. We will be better served by a network that, like Usenet, doesn't care how people engage, and that allows them to make their own connections. [...] We need to revisit, reassess, and learn from all of our past social networks. Demanding and building a social network that serves us and enables free speech, rather than serving a business metric that amplifies noise, is the way to end the farce." (Mike Loukides, O'Reilly Media): https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/from-usenet-to-facebook-the-second-time-as-farce
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Commented on post by Allen Varney+Olman Feelyus Was that Deja News? Which was then bought by Google and turned into Google Groups. Which Google then screwed with before effectively abandoning. A big problem (or upside) with usenet is the lack of a consistent client. This might have introduced client competition but actually destroyed the platform when all the clients sucked and faded away. There's a big layer of blame to be attached here to Microsoft. At Usenet's height, when it might have made the leap to the next level of engagement, MS was pushing Outlook which had no Usenet client. Which meant running Outlook Express as well, which was pretty pathetic. Mailing lists suffered the same fate and have many of the same problems. Even now there are really no email readers that understand mailing lists and have any mailing list specific function. Google owns both Gmail and Googlegroups, but they don't play well together. And Gmail doesn't really understand maling lists either. Running your own mailing list software is an exercise in horror. Which means the easiest option is Yahoogroups. Which again is horribly flawed and dying. And then there's RSS/Atom. Competition among clients, leading to a dominant player (Google reader) which then closed down. Leading to the "river of news" function moving to Twitter and Facebook. Where it sucks and has been co-opted by the troll factories. Next rant, chat software. And especially group chat. "IRC/AIM/XMPP to Facebook/Twitter: The second time as farce." — "Facebook repeats the pattern of Usenet, this time as farce. As a no-holds-barred Wild West sort of social network, Usenet was filled with everything we rightly complain about today. [...] The first thing we should learn from Usenet is the importance of moderation. Fully human moderation at Facebook scale is impossible. With seven billion pieces of content shared per day, even a million moderators would have to scan 7,000 posts each: roughly 4 seconds per post. But we don't need to rely on human moderation. After Usenet's decline, research showed it was possible to classify users as newbies, helpers, leaders, trolls, or flamers, purely by their communications patterns, with only minimal help from the content. This could be the basis for automated moderation assistants that kick suspicious posts over to human moderators, who would then have the final word. [...] "Usenet had no engagement metrics, no means of linking users to stronger content. Islands of hatred certainly existed, but in a network that didn't optimize for engagement, hate groups didn't spread. Neo-Nazis and their like were certainly there, but you had to search them out; you weren't pushed to them. The platform didn't lead you there, trying to maximize your 'engagement.' I can't claim that was some sort of brilliant design on Usenet's part; it just wasn't something anyone thought about at the time. And as a free service, there is a need to maximize profit. Facebook's obsession with engagement is ultimately more dangerous than their sloppy handling of personal data. 'Engagement' allows -- indeed, encourages -- hate groups to metastasize. "Engagement metrics harm free speech, another ideal carried to the modern internet from the Usenet world. But in an 'attention economy,' where the limiting factor is attention, not speech, we have to rethink what those values mean. I've said Usenet ended in a 'whimper' -- but what drained the energy away? The participants who contributed real value just got tired of wading through the spam and fighting off the trolls. They went elsewhere. Usenet's history gives us a warning: Good speech was crowded off the stage by bad speech. [...] "If we're to put an end to the farce, we need to understand what it means to enable speech, rather than to drown it out. Abandoning 'engagement' is part of the solution. We will be better served by a network that, like Usenet, doesn't care how people engage, and that allows them to make their own connections. [...] We need to revisit, reassess, and learn from all of our past social networks. Demanding and building a social network that serves us and enables free speech, rather than serving a business metric that amplifies noise, is the way to end the farce." (Mike Loukides, O'Reilly Media): https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/from-usenet-to-facebook-the-second-time-as-farce
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Commented on post by Julian BondEvery UK Prime Minister has to have a war. If Theresa's is limited to a small strike by 4 aircraft against pointless targets then the world will have got off lightly. And without recalling Parliament? Even Blair & Cameron had the good grace to go through the motions of democratic process. — That Feeling When: You wake up, check the news and discover we're at war again. https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2018/04/just-whos-pulling-the-strings/ https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/14/theresa-may-britain-air-strikes-syria-chemical-weapons-raf
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaThink yourself lucky they didn't get turned into unpaid internships. Or 6 week unpaid trials. If you can't afford to pay a living wage, then you're not running a business. You're running a government sponsored charity. — Fast food giants, coffee shops and retailers are relabelling low-skilled jobs as apprenticeships [...]Many firms have rebranded existing roles after being obliged to contribute cash to on-the-job training. This happens, of course, because the government wants it to happen. [The government] introduced an apprenticeship levy on organisations paying more than £3m in salaries a year. They have to pay 0.5% of their wages total into a "digital account" held by HMRC. They then "spend" these contributions on apprenticeship training delivered by registered providers. They can also get back up to 90% of the cost of training. And those registered providers allow KFC to relabel someone who fries potato chips as 'apprentice hospitality team member'. I wish I would make this up. Its almost as if the UK government wants an uneducated, low-skilled, pliable workforce.
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Commented on post by Meep in ShenanigansMorning funny. The Facebook is strong in this one. And in the culture of corruption. In all the pictures of the dead eyes, you can almost hear the voices echoing inside. "It'll soon be over. A few hours of unpleasantness is a small price to pay." https://plus.google.com/photos/106416716945076707395/albums/6543115237834643681/6543115240451778178 — Facebook suspends another data analytics firm after CNBC discovers it was using tactics like Cambridge Analytica. The CubeYou discovery suggests that collecting data from quizzes and using it for marketing purposes was far from an isolated incident. Moreover, the fact that CubeYou was able to mislabel the purpose of the quizzes — and that Facebook did nothing to stop it until CNBC pointed out the problem — suggests the platform has little control over this activity. #techweasels
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitIt's annoying, but not really surprising, that you can't simply refer them to other government departments. He seems like a fairly normal chap. So there should be HMRC PAYE, NI contributions, NHS records, Electoral roll, council tax, school records. He's just old enough to have had a job prior to 1973 and paid tax. But I bet there's a bureaucratic catch 22. They're allowed to destroy records older than 7 years. But to prove who you are, you have to produce them. — Braithwaite is one of an emerging group of people who were born in Commonwealth countries and arrived in the UK as children who have discovered half a century later that they have serious and hard to fix immigration problems. Lawyers working for people in this situation say the level of documentary proof required by the Home Office is extremely high, with officials requesting to see a minimum of one, but preferably four, pieces of documentary evidence for every year spent in the UK. Often GP surgeries and schools that might have been able to provide documentary proof of their residence have since closed, and records destroyed. Alright folks, hands up. Which of you could provide four documents for every year you spent in the country you are presently living in? (Freed from a private share.)
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Commented on post by Meep in ShenanigansIf that is the case, then clearly the common carrier defence no longer works. It's a familiar sequence for these things. - Did they do evil? - Did they help other people to do evil? - Did they know evil was being done, but failed to do anything about it? - Did they specifically create systems for people who wanted to do evil? - Will the appearance of evil do anything to their bottom line? - And so on ... On that last one. Facebook may or may not have broken any laws. But the suggestion that they might have has already wiped billions off their stock. Has it reduced their income though? How bad has it been for marketing and sales? — Facebook suspends another data analytics firm after CNBC discovers it was using tactics like Cambridge Analytica. The CubeYou discovery suggests that collecting data from quizzes and using it for marketing purposes was far from an isolated incident. Moreover, the fact that CubeYou was able to mislabel the purpose of the quizzes — and that Facebook did nothing to stop it until CNBC pointed out the problem — suggests the platform has little control over this activity. #techweasels
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Commented on post by Meep in ShenanigansFacebook is the problem because it's an out of control enabler that sells access to data. But it's also a distraction because the real problems are the organisations that used the data they extracted from Facebook and the systems it provided. It wasn't Facebook that poisoned elections and referenda. It was the alt-right, ACL, CA, AiQ, Leave.eu, , etc, etc, etc that used Facebook as a weapon. — Facebook suspends another data analytics firm after CNBC discovers it was using tactics like Cambridge Analytica. The CubeYou discovery suggests that collecting data from quizzes and using it for marketing purposes was far from an isolated incident. Moreover, the fact that CubeYou was able to mislabel the purpose of the quizzes — and that Facebook did nothing to stop it until CNBC pointed out the problem — suggests the platform has little control over this activity. #techweasels
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Commented on post by Benjamin Ljung in Why's that?Widen the Bell curve! (c Neal Stephenson - Cryptonomicon)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaIf only Google had followed that law instead of "don't be evil". — Can I buy, say, 20 copies? (Via +Erica DeMers .)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaTwo simple rules that should be enshrined in a UN convention of human rights. If implemented widely, they could lead to universal world peace. Among other things. 1) Be most excellent to each other 2) Don't be a dick — Can I buy, say, 20 copies? (Via +Erica DeMers .)
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Commented on post by Uche Eke in The bre-X-it FilesEvery election there's a little question mark over some aspect. Occasionally, as with the Tower Hamlets mayor, we ask somebody to resign. But I don't think we've ever thrown out the result or forced a re-run of the election. Having said that, dragging the leaders of the Leave movements like Aaron Banks, Farage, Johnson, Fox, Gove, Davies into court would be entertaining. Even getting them to answer to a Parliamentary committee. We can only hop that they get so disgraced that they have to leave politics forever.
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Commented on post by Alex Pedro in Google+ UpdatesTopics remains completely useless, because the choice of topic genres is static and frankly bizarre. It's so obviously broken, it's hard to understand what on earth G+ is playing at. — Does anyone use the Topics feature? I think it'd be more useful if we could follow a topic and get the best posts from that appearing in our feed (kinda like what's trending does). Edit: To be clear, this is the feature I'm talking about: https://www.blog.google/products/google-plus/googleplus-topics/
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Commented on post by Sisco Vanilla in Mixology 🍸I'm going to store this and the previous blackberry recipe up for 6 months, because these are autumn fruits not spring! There's a couple of variations possible for both recipes with Raspberries (Chambord or creme de framboise) or Blackcurrants (creme de cassis). We've always got Creme de Cassis for Kir and Kir Royale. The best brand I've found is Briottet for all these fruit syrups. The Cassis works with all kinds of things. The Crème de Mure, not so much. — Since I posted a Blackberry Basil Margarita recipe the other day, here is a rum recipe for you. Bacardi Blackberry Bramble Ingredients: 2 oz. Bacardi Superior 1 oz. Lemon Juice 1/2 oz. Simple Syrup 1/2 oz. Crème de Mure Basil Leaf and Blackberry for Garnish Preparation: Shake the first three ingredients vigorously with plenty of ice, strain into a glass, drizzle Crème de Mure on top. Garnish with basil and blackberry skewer Sounds delicious #BacardiRum #RonBacardi #BacardiSuperior #Rum #LemonJuice #SimpleSyrup #CremeDeMure #Blackberry #Basil #Bramble #Cocktail #Cocktails #Coctel #Cocteles #Cocteleria #SiscoVanilla #SiscoVanillaIsStepping
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Commented on post by Sean Roan in ¯\_(ツ)_/¯And then, Jacob Rees-Mogg — As proven daily by +Peter Thomas
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaConflicted by this because I find Facebook really useful. However, I wish Twitter was consumed by fire and then eaten by a grue. Cambridge Analytica (in all it's guises, shell companies and it's supporters) though, is just plain evil. — 'I am being used as scapegoat - academic who mined Facebook data' Ah, the often murky world of collaborations between business and academia. Aleksandr Kogan, a Moldovan-born researcher from Cambridge University, harvested the personal details of 50 million Facebook users via a personality app he developed. Kogan told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that he was being unfairly blamed for the scandal. He said: “My view is that I’m being basically used as a scapegoat by both Facebook and Cambridge Analytica. Honestly we thought we were acting perfectly appropriately. We thought we were doing something that was really normal.” Sure, scraping 50 million Facebook profiles is the new normal. Kogan said he was told that the scheme was legal but accepts he should have questioned the ethics of the exercise. Told by whom? The ethics board of Cambridge University, by which every research involving personal data has to be approved, I presume? Kogan set up Global Science Research (GSR) to carry out Cambridge Analytica’s data research. Nice. You still have to follow EU data protection directives, pal. While at Cambridge he accepted a position at St Petersburg State University, and also took Russian government grants for research. I have so many questions.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexithttps://twitter.com/Howard_Goodall/status/976005850941837314 Nice bloke at Heathrow currency exchange desk asks whether Brexit will be good for my industry. When I said no, disastrous, he said he asks everyone the same question: and Every. Single. Person gives the same answer. But a bunch of Old Etonian conmen think they know better. — Yo dawg, I need a transition from your transition, in order to deal with another transition. Meanwhile, "nearly one in seven EU companies with U.K. suppliers have already moved some of their business out of Britain and almost a quarter of U.K. businesses are planning to reduce their workforce to offset Brexit-related costs."
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Commented on post by Diane Takaki in NewsworthyQuit Facebook Now. Um. Why? - Apply aggressive ad blocking. Keep killing the right hand sidebar with the helpful suggestions in it. - Set up a list of Close Friends - Bookmark the Close Friends feed and use that as your entry point into Facebook - NEVER visit the main facebook feed. Not even once. NEVER. - If you post on facebook, Post only to close friends or in groups. Use Post to Public sparingly and carefully. - Use security to prevent anyone but close friends commenting on your posts. - Use groups, events and whatever else takes your fancy. - NEVER use the iPhone and Android apps unless you absolutely have to because you can't easily apply the previous items - Like all social media. Aggressively block and unfriend the idiots. None of that's hard. And it turns Facebook from an evil spy in your life into quite a useful tool. — Seriously this is turning into a horror movie.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitPost-Brexit. When the UK is a tax haven and money laundering centre. We'll welcome them back. — Meanwhile, in Londongrad For two decades, the British establishment has agreed not to think too hard about where the Russians got their money — how cash was stolen from the state, recycled in the West, then used to help bring Vladimir Putin and his ex-KGB colleagues to power. In return, the Russians spent a lot of that money in Britain, to the benefit of the British. The relationship has, at times, been extraordinarily complicit. There was the 2006 London flotation of Rosneft, the oil company created from the stolen assets of another oil company, whose owner had been arrested and sent to prison in Siberia. The prospectus did actually warn potential purchasers of the risks: “Crime and corruption could create a difficult business climate in Russia.” But the sale went forward, reaped rewards for those who arranged it and established a principle: Stolen goods can become legal, as long as the London financial establishment approves. We could outlaw tax havens, in the Virgin Islands as well as in Delaware and Nevada; we could make it impossible to buy property anonymously; we could ban Russian companies with dubious origins from our stock exchanges. But that would cost our own financiers and real estate agents, disrupt the discreet flow of cash into the coffers of political parties, deprive the art market of its biggest investors. Does May have the nerve to do that? Do any of us?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Tony Hales You mean the one in the Irish Sea? Or maybe the one at Gretna Green. — A bit of cold water, just in case next week's Brexit agreements will be hailed as a "breakthrough". The upcoming agreement is a political one, and not a legal text. Further, it is contingent to a solution to the Irish border problem. Everything now revolves around the Irish border.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, SchmacademiaShakes fist at sky. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P65V-cst6TY — Today's lunchtime conversations focussed on: the proper application of nerve agents, moles, double agents, triple agents, false flags, rogues, global thermonuclear war and spies that came in from the cold.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeA Russian ConAir. Maybe this - "Shtrafbat" ? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shtrafbat Or is it another part of Operation Mindfuck from the infamous Gold'N'Appel Corp? — Someone is going to make a movie about this. With Nic Cage.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeNot to argue with the main thrust of the post, but both post WWI and post WWII produced huge social change in the UK in the immediate aftermath. Lloyd George Liberal and Attlee Labour were instrumental in bringing in the Welfare state. There was a fundamental and Socialist change as a landslide reaction to the predominantly Capitalist and Conservative war years. — 'Almost too successful' On changes in political systems, and that they are sometimes catastrophic, but that this is not necessarily a bad thing, in the long term. Let us start with the wars of the 20th century. Unsurprisingly, the countries that were invaded or defeated tended to be the ones that underwent the most fundamental changes. Germany, Japan and France all gained new constitutions after 1945. By contrast, neither the UK, which was seemingly a victor power, nor the US, which was certainly a victor power, changed its political system in the wake of the Second World War. Instead, in both countries, victory served for a while to burnish and strengthen the existing political order. Over the centuries both the United Kingdom and the United States have indeed been almost too successful in their recourse to war, and this has had mixed repercussions for their political systems and democracy. And so the political system established in 1787 in the US is still reasonably well cemented in the present. You can call this a success story, and it certainly is. But certain root causes for political dysfunction are growing from that tree as well. That amendment, passed in 1791, when most firearms were muskets? The UK exhibits comparable problems, but to a more pronounced degree. Like the US, but over a longer period of time, the UK has been both a markedly warlike state and generally a successful one. No invasion since 1688, most overseas adventures a success. As a result, in the United Kingdom even more than in the United States, old structures of politics were able to persist. It’s true that the electorate steadily widened, though only slowly. But the House of Commons, the House of Lords, the monarchy, the pre-eminence of London, and certain conventions of political and electoral practice: these things endured. Nothing has happened that might have forced a major process of political reconfiguration, as distinct from ad hoc adjustments. And this raises a set of questions and possibilities. Certain conventions, indeed. It all looks pretty droll from the outside, but Westminster reeks of decay. Could it be that Britain’s political stability has become too pronounced? That, by not having to adjust and alter its political system as so many other countries have had to do, the UK has stored up unaddressed problems and unhelpful stagnancies? If so, might the convulsions and divisions over Brexit have some tonic effect? I suppose we will see. But note that many countries which got shiny new constitutions in 1945 did so on a continent thoroughly soaked in blood.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeHe's not playing Chess. Or Poker. Or American football. He's playing Go. — A bit of Korean chess, anyone?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitA Customs Union. Whatever that means. No Single Market. No discussion about Brexit Oh, Jeremy Corbyn. When are you going to start listening to your new young members, supporters and voters? Just keep on dissembling until the May local elections are out of the way. Then what? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-43343196 — The disheveled man, who was addressing people in Dundee, is seen to intersperse oddball and complex socialist theory with paranoid ramblings about the EU destroying the British working class using cheap labour from abroad. A friend of Mr Corbyn from the care group Momentum, Simon Williams, explained that it was unfair to judge the man by contemporary standards. “Jeremy’s got a heart of gold. He doesn’t mean any harm by it. It’s just he’s from a generation that sees outsiders as invaders. On a one to one basis he’ll treat immigrants like brothers. It’s just he reads a lot of tabloids and he’s a got a thing for Northerners. If someone from Yorkshire says something bigoted, he’ll just nod along because he doesn’t like ruffling feathers." Took me a bit to notice that this was NewsThump.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThat article needs to be written. — Portrait of the reactionary as a quaint forthright man.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitInteresting article. Thank you for that. But note that there's no reference to "Mao-ist" in the article. Or even much talk of creative destruction. Apart from the early paragraph about not preserving that which is moth-eaten. — Portrait of the reactionary as a quaint forthright man.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitCan I just say, Corbyn really whips the Llama's Ass. Llamas for the many not the few. — Meanwhile, Boris Johnson visits a primary school. Kids are obviously thrilled.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI've long been puzzled why a shortage of energy supply leads to a drop in frequency. This seems to be related to some kind of Victorian steam engineering involving governors. These days there's lots of solid state AC-DC-AC conversion going on. In which case a Europe wide phase synchronisation should be completely independent of local supply imbalances. But. It's complicated. And given that complication I'd expect all kinds of weird waves of chaotic system behaviour. — I found it fascinating how the BBC spun a technical issue about electrical frequencies into a story with an anti-European sentiment. Just imagine this happening for 30 years in a row.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeStore all the things! — "You can't have everything. Where would you put it?" Steven Wright
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI've been wondering where to add it, but I just saw this in a local UK Labour Party newsletter. "After the May Local Government elections the Labour Party will revise its position on Brexit" Ah, politics and the pursuit of power. Donchajusloveem! The Labour Party is so busy trying to get itself elected, it's ignoring the big problems. And it's somehow persuaded itself (ahem, Momentum has pursuaded it) that an overtly anti-brexit stance will hurt it in the polls. So it won't do that until the May->Mar 2019 window when there's no elections scheduled. It is to weep. — Milestones. Milestones are coming.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Chris Blackmore It seems to require some kind of revolution of the middle. The people who need to rise up and stand for what they actually believe are the boring MPs who always vote along party lines and never rebel. They personally voted Remain. But then they all voted for Art50. If given half a chance, they now need to vote to stop the madness, no matter what party central says. And yes, this cuts right across party lines. There's just as many of these types of MPs in Labour as there are in the Conservatives. — If you happen to be in London on Monday morning: the sound you hear is the sound of worst-case contingency plans executed.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWell we can't have the city of London making so much money and keeping everything else afloat by selling their financial products across Europe from a base in the City of London. Because then they'd be at the mercy of rules and a court in Europe. So since the City of London is already a law unto itself with it's own police force, it should just unilaterally leave the union and stay in/join the EU. Crossing the congestion charge zone boundary is already fully automated and CCTVed. So Boris should have no problem with a hard brexit border between the City and the rest of London that is electronically and almost invisibly mediated. You'll just have to look up and smile at the camera each day as you tap in with your contactless card to pay your "Passporting Tax", as you travel in and out of The City. Any homeless found within the City will be shipped out to it's emigration holding tank in the City's lands in Epping Forest. — If you happen to be in London on Monday morning: the sound you hear is the sound of worst-case contingency plans executed.
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Commented on post by Jim DouglasThere should be some reference to types of guns here as well. For instance. UK. 1. You want to buy a handgun. 2. You can't — Canada 1 To buy a handgun, join an accredited shooting club. 2 Complete a safety course and pass both a written and a practical test. 3 Ask for two references. (*) 4 Apply for a permit, and wait 28 days before processing begins. 5 Pass a background check that considers your criminal record, mental health, addiction and domestic violence history. 6 Buy a gun. If you bought a handgun, register it with the police before taking it home. (*) In addition to two character references, Canadians must list the names of partners they have lived with in the last two years, all of whom must sign the application or be notified by the police before you can buy a gun. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/03/02/world/international-gun-laws.html
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Commented on post by John Hardy in Greenhouse PoliticsI'm puzzled though. What is she doing with that jar of Vegemite? You can't drink it, can you?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademia"Even if they radiated the outside, the engine would be dirty," But, but, it's electric! — I have to admit I haven't thought about that.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademia"The load of bacteria on the Tesla could be considered a biothreat, or a backup copy of life on Earth," she said." I'm going for backup copy. This is the real Musk plan. To send life to other planets, not necessarily human life. And I think it's backwards. We should be sending a package of bacteria, mushroom spores and tardigrades on every spacecraft. just in case. Ancient aliens did this to Earth so we should return the favour. Even if they didn't, we can. We could call it "The Starseed Project". — I have to admit I haven't thought about that.
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Commented on post by Dave WonnacottThe spam is ironic, right? — Indefensible. Totally crooked. Taxpayers' money used to buy votes. There was a time when this was illegal and would have brought down the Government. The current batch of Tories disgusts me and I imagine they disgust many moderate Tories today.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWhat do Momentum think about Corbyn's speech today? They did retweet Corbyn, but that seems to be it. — The Confederation of British Industry has endorsed Corbyn's position on Brexit. That's right, the people who presently hold the means of production have endorsed someone who is regularly described as a Marxist. Or Leninist. Or socialist. Take your pick. Hell has officially frozen over.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Frank Rehse Pronouns are just a technicality. — So Labour now has an official position on Brexit, as confirmed by Keir 'the enforcer' Starmer. The shadow cabinet voted unanimous for it, so thats it. Now what is Labour's present position? Starmer said the party wanted the UK to have “a” customs union with the EU after Brexit, rather than to remain in “the” customs union, but he also said this distinction was merely technical and that in practice the effect would be the same. “The customs arrangements at the moment are hardwired into the membership treaty, so I think everybody now recognises there is going to have to be a new treaty [between the UK and the EU]. It will do the work of the customs union. So it is a customs union,” Starmer said. “But will it do the work of the current customs union? Yes, that’s the intention.” Starmer said staying in a customs union was “the only way realistically” for the UK to get tariff-free access to the EU. This was really important for manufacturing, he said. Slowly preparing your voters for staying in the EU, Keir?
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitToday, Customs Union. Tomorrow, Single Market? — So Labour now has an official position on Brexit, as confirmed by Keir 'the enforcer' Starmer. The shadow cabinet voted unanimous for it, so thats it. Now what is Labour's present position? Starmer said the party wanted the UK to have “a” customs union with the EU after Brexit, rather than to remain in “the” customs union, but he also said this distinction was merely technical and that in practice the effect would be the same. “The customs arrangements at the moment are hardwired into the membership treaty, so I think everybody now recognises there is going to have to be a new treaty [between the UK and the EU]. It will do the work of the customs union. So it is a customs union,” Starmer said. “But will it do the work of the current customs union? Yes, that’s the intention.” Starmer said staying in a customs union was “the only way realistically” for the UK to get tariff-free access to the EU. This was really important for manufacturing, he said. Slowly preparing your voters for staying in the EU, Keir?
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Commented on post by Wiggysan Wiggysan in Motorcycle Roadracing+Wiggysan Wiggysan Not now, but soon. As some kind of restructuring in 2019 or 2020. eg. https://www.reddit.com/r/motogp/comments/7doad6/satellite_teams_in_2019_and_on/ Most of us know that Dorna wants each of the six factory teams to field a satellite team in the very near future. KTM and Suzuki have already expressed interest and Aprilia says they would be ready to do so. — Yamaha & Tech3 to split I did not see this coming, but maybe I should have. Tech3 to run either +KTM or maybe +Team Suzuki Racing satellite machines whilst Rossi retires & runs a factory supported "Team VR46 Academy Monster Yamaha" team ? Time will tell. ________________________________________ #MotoGP +MotoGP +Yamaha MotoGP +Yamaha Racing +Tech3Racing #Tech3 +KTM +Red Bull +Monster Energy #VR46 #Rossi #20years
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Commented on post by Wiggysan Wiggysan in Motorcycle RoadracingIsn't there a requirement in there somewhere from Dorna that all factories MUST run a satellite team? — Yamaha & Tech3 to split I did not see this coming, but maybe I should have. Tech3 to run either +KTM or maybe +Team Suzuki Racing satellite machines whilst Rossi retires & runs a factory supported "Team VR46 Academy Monster Yamaha" team ? Time will tell. ________________________________________ #MotoGP +MotoGP +Yamaha MotoGP +Yamaha Racing +Tech3Racing #Tech3 +KTM +Red Bull +Monster Energy #VR46 #Rossi #20years
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Commented on post by Graham Reed in blue hazeWhat frame do you think that is? — Something a bit different....
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Commented on post by Sisco Vanilla in Mixology 🍸You can cheat this one successfully. - Pour a drop of Pastis in a frozen rocks glass, swill it around and then tip it in the sink. - A bar spoon is about 3ml which is about 3 dashes or Peychaud Bitters. Throw that in the glass - Add 50-60 ml of whatever bourbon or Rye you've got in the cupboard. - A bar spoon of simple or double syrup - Add one ice cube, a lemon twist and give it a quick stir. — Forgot to post this last Tuesday. Well here is the Sazerac: Sazerac 🔸2oz Sazerac Rye Whiskey 🔸.25oz Absinthe 🔸3 Dashes Pechauds Bitters 🔸1 sugar cube 🔸2 or 3 drops of water In glass muddle sugar cube and Pechauds bitters. Pour in Sazerac Rye Whiskey and stir. Pour into chilled glass that has been washed by the Absinthe. Add a few drops of water and garnish with a lemon peel. This is one potent cocktail. It had some very nice notes on the nose from both the herbal Absinthe and the lemon peel. The Sazerac Rye is nice and spicy with a hint of the sweetness from the muddled sugar cube. It's a strong one folks. Sip and enjoy it. #FinnsCorner #Bartending #BarBusiness #BehindTheStick #Sazerac #FatTuesday #MardiGras #Cocktail #Cocktails #Coctel #Cocteles #Cocteleria #SiscoVanilla #SiscoVanillaIsStepping
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Commented on post by John Hardy in Culture of Late CapitalismStrange bedfellows. Matt Ridley, Steve Pinker, Max Roser. There's a few others who circle around like Stewart Brand, Mark Lynas. — Pinker remains the preeminent bard of liberal self-satisfaction and complacency. Naturally his historical treatment of the Enlightenment is deeply ahistorical.
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Commented on post by John Hardy in Culture of Late CapitalismFunny you should mention him. https://twitter.com/mattwridley/status/966074652006199296 Has he got a book out? He seems to have been doing the rounds in the UK. — Pinker remains the preeminent bard of liberal self-satisfaction and complacency. Naturally his historical treatment of the Enlightenment is deeply ahistorical.
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Commented on post by Lev Osherovich in Post TruthThis thread. Needs reading. Up to 16 fake news instances now. https://twitter.com/MollyMcKew/status/966137293818998784 Bot Power! — In certain right-wing corners of the web — and, increasingly, from more mainstream voices like Rush Limbaugh and a commentator on CNN — the students are being portrayed not as grief-ridden survivors but as pawns and conspiracists intent on exploiting a tragedy to undermine the nation’s laws. In these baseless accounts, which by Tuesday had spread rapidly on social media, the students are described as “crisis actors,” who travel to the sites of shootings to instigate fury against guns. Or they are called F.B.I. plants, defending the bureau for its failure to catch the shooter. They have been portrayed as puppets being coached and manipulated by the Democratic Party, gun control activists, the so-called antifa movement and the left-wing billionaire George Soros. .... Alex Jones, the conspiracy theorist behind the site Infowars, suggested that the mass shooting was a “false flag” orchestrated by anti-gun groups. Mr. Limbaugh, on his radio program, said of the student activists on Monday: “Everything they’re doing is right out of the Democrat Party’s various playbooks. It has the same enemies: the N.R.A. and guns.” By Tuesday, that argument had migrated to CNN. In an on-air appearance, Jack Kingston, a former United States representative from Georgia and a regular CNN commentator, asked, “Do we really think — and I say this sincerely — do we really think 17-year-olds on their own are going to plan a nationwide rally?”
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Olaf Fichtner It's the terror of knowing What the world is about Watching some good friends Screaming 'Let me out' Prefer Spandau Ballet's - Pressure On mainly because I worked on it. (didn't get a credit though!) I feel the gaze against my skin I know this feeling is a lie There's a guilt within my mind I know this feeling is a lie She knows, you know. Throw her in the fire. — Jacob Rees-Mogg is making his move. He has delivered a letter to Theresa May, with the backing of 61 other Tories. (Enough to challenge her leadership.) The hardliners want a hard Brexit. It's kind of funny to watch the mutiny unfold, with deranged mutineers smoking in the ship's magazine, and the captain, bereft of ammunition, trying to parley. Sensible seamen have made it to the lifeboats, ready to cut the ropes. Other ships in the flotilla watch with bemusement, keeping safe distance, their crews betting on how long this will last, and how quick she will sink.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitFinally, finally, https://xkcd.com/1022/ — Jacob Rees-Mogg is making his move. He has delivered a letter to Theresa May, with the backing of 61 other Tories. (Enough to challenge her leadership.) The hardliners want a hard Brexit. It's kind of funny to watch the mutiny unfold, with deranged mutineers smoking in the ship's magazine, and the captain, bereft of ammunition, trying to parley. Sensible seamen have made it to the lifeboats, ready to cut the ropes. Other ships in the flotilla watch with bemusement, keeping safe distance, their crews betting on how long this will last, and how quick she will sink.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeBy all means discuss. But don't feed the trolls. Block and report them. On a short fuse. One strike and you're out. If you're feeling kind, one yellow card. — Safety notice.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademiahttps://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/feb/13/how-iceland-became-the-bitcoin-miners-paradise The island nation is the first to use more electricity on mining cryptocurriencies than on its households – thanks in part to its magma-fuelled power plants WTF? SRSLY! WTF! — Can those crypto-miners please take their fucking tulips and go home? We have other things to do. (Via +Edward Morbius .)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit"someone from the Global Warming Policy Foundation" Do tell! — How £435,000 where spent on campaigning for Brexit, with the money being paid by the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), a party exclusively operating in Northern Ireland. Oh, wait, the money actually didn't come from the DUP. The DUP got the money from the Constitutional Research Council, CRC. And who is involved in the CRC? Scottish Tories, a Saudi Prince who was once the head of the Saudi Intelligence Agency, someone who smuggled arms into India, a former Field Marshal, someone who runs a company that provides "bespoke intelligence services", someone from Palantir, someone from the Global Warming Policy Foundation, and a couple of other... interesting people.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitBTW. Can someone explain the Furry Cup to me in the Guardian cartoons that often accompanies the Boris Cyclops. eg. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2018/feb/14/martin-rowson-on-boris-johnsons-brexit-speech-cartoon — Ladies and Gentlemen, the Foreign Secretary is taking questions. God help us. This is some Trumpian level of deflection.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitThe 🥕🥕🥕 have it. Or rather, Boris reminds us that "we're all doomed". https://twitter.com/MichaelPDeacon/status/963755157094850560 Bonus vid. Derek & Clive - Jump https://vimeo.com/32637671 — Ladies and Gentlemen, the Foreign Secretary is taking questions. God help us. This is some Trumpian level of deflection.
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Social Problems and Social Change+Sakari Maaranen It's a reference to David Brin - Transparent Society. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Transparent_Society For a while there, public webcams were a thing. These days, they seem to be disappearing. And the one's that are around in London are distant, low res and tend to get switched off at the least sign of demonstrations or trouble. The real trick though is to encourage the public to track themselves using things like Strava. Places like London and Singapore have been tracking vehicles for a while now in order to implement vehicle charging systems. They have promised that 1) the data wouldn't get passed to the police. 2) The police would get access but delete it after a time, 3) The police could keep it for extended periods of time. 4) The police can just forget to delete it. — Score One for Privacy: Seattle Rips Out Surveillance Network This is a story of privacy and civil rights activists shifting policy here in Seattle where I live. It's a nice example of a city drawing a line between a police force dedicated to community policing and one backed by Homeland security technologies with the potential to be a dangerous threat to civil liberties, especially given the current administration in Washington, D.C. _"We have a longstanding principle that suspicionless surveillance of general populations is not useful and chills people’s constitutionally protected rights.” And note, further down in the article, how the Seattle City Council is now taking a more proactive stance in reviewing the city's various surveillance tools.
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Commented on post by Sakari Maaranen in Get DefensiveIs Cloudflare a common carrier or not? They provide services to Pirate Bay, apparently have no qualms about supporting site promoting hate speech. But remove SciHub. Nope. They're a for profit service that needs to respect national laws or face the consequences. Both legal and brand marketing. — Cloudflare is spreading neo-Nazi racial hatred direct into the UK, at a time when the UK has suffered four terror attacks over 12 months, including one from a far-right extremist.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege+John Baez Really? Condensed version of "foreigner has", surely. The foreigner's what: Robot? So you were working for Tata, amirite! No pension for you then. — Political poster, UK, 1906. Party unknown, but best guess is Liberal Unionist, which later merged with the Tories. Some things never change.
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Social Problems and Social ChangeIs there any merit in making all those cams, public access webcams. And using the mesh network to provide city wide free wifi? — Score One for Privacy: Seattle Rips Out Surveillance Network This is a story of privacy and civil rights activists shifting policy here in Seattle where I live. It's a nice example of a city drawing a line between a police force dedicated to community policing and one backed by Homeland security technologies with the potential to be a dangerous threat to civil liberties, especially given the current administration in Washington, D.C. _"We have a longstanding principle that suspicionless surveillance of general populations is not useful and chills people’s constitutionally protected rights.” And note, further down in the article, how the Seattle City Council is now taking a more proactive stance in reviewing the city's various surveillance tools.
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Commented on post by Alan Stainer in Green Technology+Alan Stainer If it has 1500 watts and has a max speed of 60kmph then it's not a bicycle in any jurisdiction I know of. Which means it's something like a Quad or Light Car with all that implies. Tax, MOT, Insurance, Driver Licensing, Testing, etc, etc, etc. So broadly similar to something like the Renault Twizy I mentioned earlier. — A Bike Or A Car? Meet Podbike! Innovations comes in many forms and the big names shouldn't get all the limelight. This is Podbike, a four wheeler bike with three electric motors. Cycling and comfort and convenience combined. h/t +Danie van der Merwe
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Commented on post by Alan Stainer in Green TechnologyIn the UK (and elsewhere), we need a good category for road users of things like this that falls between E-Bicycle (250w-25kph) and Quad, Light car. It's like this is one size smaller/lighter than a Renault Twizy but it's more than a trike or Velomobile. But then it has to share the roads with aggregate lorries, white van man, and Audi-BMW-RangeRover SUV. That's bad enough on a bicycle. A least you wouldn't get the punishment close pass, but you would get the road rage if it only does 15mph. — A Bike Or A Car? Meet Podbike! Innovations comes in many forms and the big names shouldn't get all the limelight. This is Podbike, a four wheeler bike with three electric motors. Cycling and comfort and convenience combined. h/t +Danie van der Merwe
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitCan I please nominate, Charles Pooter. "Nobody" seems preferable to "None of the above". — Next Tory leader: None of the Above None of the Above, a real up and comer, with a 44% lead over Boris Johnson. Unfortunately, None of the Above was unable to comment.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitI suspect there's a huge amount of Gov IT that won't be up to the task, not just this. — 'Key EU migrant scheme may not be ready before Brexit' (Paywalled, but what I could discern from another source is as follows. Up to a month ago, the general idea was to treat EU citizens arriving before the Brexit date (March 2019) and those arriving during the transition period (about 2 additional years) exactly the same. Then Theresa May turned around and said that the second category of EU citizens should not have all the rights of the first category. (Why? Fuck you, thats why.) This necessitates now two citizen registers, and not only one. Guess what? Government IT won't be up to the task.)
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitAnd you may ask yourself What is that beautiful house? And you may ask yourself Where does that highway go to? And you may ask yourself Are we right? Are we wrong? And you may say to yourself, "My God! What have we done?" — On the road to Brexit.
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Commented on post by Miriam Rozian in Data CorruptionI use FB every day. Primarily for special interest groups[1] and to follow a list of maybe 100 pages. I find the conversation about ads strange as I NEVER see any. Adblock + 9.9.9.9 simply hides all of them. I very occasionally have to add a div to adblock to hide a sidebar when FB changes their style sheet. I also never look at the main feed. I have a large number of "FB Friends" (most of whom are idiots!) so I maintain a very short list of "Close Friends", bookmark it and use that as the entry point. I use the same approach to Twitter. Facebook? What's the problem? [1]Special Interest Groups and Communities of Interest. With long form text and commentary. What's the best platform for these in 2018? IRC, Usenet, Skype Groups, Yahoogroups, Mailing lists have all died. Most phpBB/vBulletin sites have died. G+Communities and GoogleGroups are f*cking useless. Reddit works but the geeky barrier to entry in the UX is too much. Right now Facebook is the best with the most engagement. — Still not using Facebook, myself. The fact that this tool had to be developed outside Facebook is so incredibly lazy, such a complete 🤷‍♀️ of responsibility for the source of Facebook profits, just reflects how obsolete and badly designed the platform is for the users (or is that "the used").
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitWhat happens if the whole UK gets forced into the Single Market and Customs Union? Does JRM make enough money for a new yacht? — Get your popcorn ready, folks! So where is the new border between the EU and the UK supposed to be? If the whole of the UK stays in the single market, we basically go for no Brexit. The only other option on the table is a border in the Irish Sea. But that will rustle all the jimmies of the Northern Loyalists, who would see this as a sellout. And thee Loyalists are presently propping up the government in Westminster...
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Commented on post by Valdis Klētnieks in Beverage warningI recently came across the phrase "government by taxidermy" in a Guardian article about Brexit. And "Turn-key Totalitarianism" from Edward Snowden in an article about John Perry Barlow. This story combines the two! Turn-key Totalitarianism Exposed By Taxidermy — The derp is strong in this one...
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Commented on post by David Collier-Brown+Sakari Maaranen Indeed. But why? — Hey Google, you're sending me sequences of email claiming I have a security problem, but the checkup at https://accounts.google.com/AccountChooser?Email=davecb.42@gmail.com[...] says I'm OK. And yes, it's not spam from someone else: spamcop confirms it's from you. I did report you to you for spamming, though (;-))
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Knowledge and InformationThe Rhetological Offence - Claiming that your opponent's argument must be wrong because they're guilty of using a Rhetological fallacy or device in their argument. — Rhetorical fallacies: 54 different errors and methods of manipulating rhetoric and logical thinking.
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Commented on post by Robert Llewellyn in Fully Charged+DB Fuller It's OK. It's American Cheese. — Impossible Burger | Fully Charged
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Commented on post by Kevin Kellyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QspuCt1FM9M Justin Beiber slowed down by 800% sounds just like Sigur Ros. So does Sigur Ros sped up by 800% sound just like Justin Beiber? — What is the slowest music possible? This youtube investigation gives a great answer, which is quite deep and very Long Now-ish. Ignore the overly hip first two-minute introduction. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afhSDK5DJqA
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Commented on post by Julian BondLine up looks ok, though. https://www.facebook.com/farrfestival/photos/a.287162308024101.66738.121067977966869/1960507910689524/?type=3 — Farr Festival https://tickets.farrfestival.co.uk/rep/jbond-farr-2018 This is going to be a hard sell this year as there's no discount for rep tickets. But, If you or your friends buy through this link and give me an email address I can reward them with £9 via paypal. But to be honest, the 5 for 4 deal is a better offer. What can I say, last year (and the year before!) was fun with great sets from Chaos in the CBD, Omar-S, Ramzi, Huerco S, Mr G, Willow, Avalon Emerson, Sad City and others. http://www.farrfestival.co.uk/
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Commented on post by Gideon Rosenblatt in Distributed TechnologiesSo it has to come to this, obligatory XKCD. https://xkcd.com/1022/ — The Heat of Bitcoin This fall, we completed a backyard cottage. It's currently unoccupied and so I agreed to allow a friend to run three Bitcoin AntMiner machines out there. This is Seattle and it was in the forties outside and I'd shut off the heat to the building while we ran these three machines. We were only running them at two-third's power and still, the temperature inside popped up to 92℉. I had to keep three upstairs windows open, just to maintain the temperature in the 80s. This was my first time being in contact with actual Bitcoin mining machines. They are super loud and are like running little heaters. I was curious because I'd heard lots of stats thrown around, and apparently, there is some controversy around estimates of Bitcoin mining electricity usage.¹ From what I could find, total worldwide energy consumption is around 33 billion kilowatt hours. For comparison, total US electricity consumption in 2016 was 3.85 trillion kilowatt hours. So, if these numbers are to be believed, Bitcoin electricity consumption is 1/1,000 of total US electricity consumption. If anyone with more knowledge on this subject has a clearer picture, please let me know. The point is, my experience over the last few days demonstrated, very heatedly, what kind of energy usage these machines create - and it's a lot. Over the course of three and a half days, my friend made around a hundred bucks, so I can see the draw from the miner's perspective, but from a societal perspective, there just has to be more ecologically sustainable paths toward building decentralized consensus facilitation. Maybe proof of stake? Not my field, but man, this experience has taken a lot of the shine off this technology for me personally. It went from a theoretical "yeah, they consume a lot of power" to "wow, that's not good." ¹ https://www.cnbc.com/2017/12/21/no-bitcoin-is-likely-not-going-to-consume-all-the-worlds-energy-in-2020.html
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Academia, Schmacademia+Bruce Elliott No microwave ovens, CAT scans or Netflix for you. — Needs another box for "irrelevant mathematical theory", feeding back into "oversimplified models", but otherwise quite accurate.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Dan Weese Neither side wants to return to first principles, that solutions only arise from a full understanding of the problem itself That's a very specifically American disease; trying to argue from first principles. Ignoring that we're not starting from scratch. We're starting from here. And also ignoring prior art. Or cherry picking from history to "prove" that certain solutions are impossible. — An elementary bit of game theory: for the Dutch, giving the Brits a special deal is more damaging than the crash of a hard Brexit. Therefore, they prefer hard Brexit. The same holds for all other EU27 nations. Bingo, Nash equilibrium found. Game over.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeI have a .sig generator I've been maintaining for decades now. Once a day it grabs a pithy saying and adds it to the bottom. It was originally seeded by a Fringeware (boingboing fore-runner) collection of product warnings. Useful advice for life like "Keep Dry and Away From Children". But it's grown. Today's warning: "Just Say No To Military Metaphors" — "If people never did silly things, nothing intelligent would ever get done." Ludwig Wittgenstein
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Commented on post by Dave Wonnacott+nigel adams You are the Russian Troll Bot in this thread, and I claim my €5 — It's nothing short of astonishing that anyone trusts anything that liar Johnson concocts. He's a disgrace to the Government and to the country. He cannot be gotten rid of soon enough.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeAnd that's not even it's final form. — Now this reminds me of something.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitAny sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice. — Why not both?
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Mixology 🍸The list gets longer! Bensonhurst: bspn Cynar, 2 bspn Maraschino, 3/4oz Dry Vermouth, 2oz Rye (C. Soloman) Bronx: 1oz Orange, 1/4oz Dry Vermouth, 1/4oz Sweet Vermouth, 2oz Gin Brooklyn: 1/2oz Dry Vermouth, 1/4oz Maraschino, 1/4oz Picon, 2oz Rye Brooklyn Heights: Orange Bitters, 1/4oz Abano, 1/2oz Dry Vermouth, 1/2oz Maraschino, 1 1/2oz Rye, Campari spritz (M. Britten) Bushwick: 1/4oz Picon, 1/4oz Maraschino, 3/4oz Sweet Vermouth, 2oz Rye (P. Ward) Carroll Gardens: bspn Maraschino, 1/2oz Sweet Vermouth, 1/2oz Nardini, 2oz Rye, Lemon twist (J. Simó) Chinatown: 1/2oz Sweet Vermouth, 1/2oz Dry Vermouth, 1/2oz Cognac, 1 1/2oz Gin Cobble Hill: Cucumber, 1/2oz Dry Vermouth, 1/2oz Montenegro, 2oz Rye, Lemon twist (S. Ross) Flushing: Harvard on the rocks Greenpoint: Orange/Angostura, 1/2oz Sweet Vermouth, 1/2oz Y. Chartreuse, 2oz Rye, Lemon twist (M. McIlroy) Little Italy: 1/2oz Sweet Vermouth, 1/2oz Cynar, 2oz Rye (A. Saunders) Newark: 1/4oz Maraschino, 1/4oz Fernet, 1oz Sweet Vermouth, 2oz Applejack (J. Deragon) Old Bayridge: Angostura, 1oz Aquavit, 1 1/2oz Rye, Lemon twist (D. Wondrich) Prospect Park: 1/4oz Sweet Vermouth, 1/4oz Maraschino, 1oz Aperol, 1 1/2oz Rye, Cherry (T. Schlesinger-Guidelli) Queens: 1/4oz Dry Vermouth, 1/4oz Sweet Vermouth, 1oz Pineapple, 2oz Gin Redhook: 1/2oz Punt e Mes, 1/2oz Maraschino, 2oz Rye, Cherry (E. Errico) Sheepshead Bay: Sweet Manhattan with a bspn of Benedictine, Cherry Sunset Park: Angostura/Peach, 1/2oz Dry Vermouth, 1/2oz Sweet vermouth, 2oz Rye, Lemon twist (M. Madrusan) The Slope: Angostura, 1/4oz Abricot, 3/4oz Sweet Vermouth, 2oz Rye, Cherry (J. Reiner) — For some reason, I started collecting recipes that were named after New York or parts of New York. Can you name any more? Manhattan, 40ml Bourbon, 20ml red Vermouth, bitters, stirred-martini Brooklyn. 40ml bourbon 20ml dry Vermouth 5ml Maraschino, bitters, shaken-martini Bronx, 30ml gin, 15ml red Vermouth, 10ml dry Vermouth, 15ml OJ, shaken-martini Queens, 30ml gin, 15ml red Vermouth, 10ml dry Vermouth, 15ml Pineapple, shaken-martini Staten Island, 40ml white rum, 40ml Pineapple rocks Red Hook. 40ml bourbon 20ml Punt e mes 5ml Maraschino, bitters, stirred-martini Harlem Mugger. 15ml vodka, 15ml gin, 15ml white rum, 15ml tequila, 90ml champagne, topped with cranberry juice. straight up and garnished with a wedge of lime. Long Island Iced Tea. 15ml Vodka, 15ml Tequila, 15ml White Rum, 15ml Triple sec, 15ml Gin, 25ml Gomme, Dash of cola.  Algonquin. 40ml Rye, 20ml Dry Vermouth, 20ml Pineapple, shaken-martini Of course you may disagree about the exact quantities in each recipe. That's not teh point, but feel free to correct me!
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Commented on post by Alan Stainer in Green TechnologyTL;DR. Inland barges not ocean going. With battery packs built into containers so they can easily be swapped. — 'Tesla ships' due to ship this autumn Container barges use a lot of diesel. When I say a lot, I mean tonnes of the stuff. So an battery powered electric container ship will cut out a considerable amount of pollution. By the way, these aren't made by Tesla, it's just a nickname they have been given. h/t +Craig Froehle https://electrek.co/2018/01/12/large-tesla-ships-all-electric-barges/
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Mixology 🍸There's more. Harlem Nights - 90ml tequila, 90ml coconut rum, 60ml Kahlua, Splash Pineapple juice, Splash peach schnapps, Shaken (for 3?) Madison Fizz - 30ml Bombay Sapphire, 15ml Marie Brizard apricot liqueur, 22ml Lemon juice, 22ml syrup, Shake. Top with 50-60ml Champagne, Mint sprig/Apricot slice The White Way Cocktail - 45ml Gin, 22ml Creme de Menthe. Shake, Martini New York Mofo - 7.5ml Vodka, 7.5ml Kahlua, 7.5ml Gin, 7.5ml rum, 60ml cream. Shake, Martini. New York Sour - 45 rye whiskey, 22ml lemon juice, 22ml syrup, splash OJ, 15ml red wine. Stir, Martini, Half orange wheel and maraschino cherry New York Black Haus - 15ml Irish Cream, 15ml Pear Liqueur, 30ml Black Haus. Stir, Shot glass. New York Lemonade - 30ml Grand Marnier, 60ml Citrus Vodka, 60ml Lemon Juice, 30ml Soda. Stir, Frosted Martini (lemon and sugar) New York Flip - 30ml Bourbon, 22ml Tawny Port, 1 egg yolk, 22ml cream, 7.5ml Sugar Syrup. Shake, Martini, sprinkle with nutmeg Autumn in New York - 30ml Cognac, 1 bottle Zima. Shake gently, Collins. https://www.nbcnewyork.com/the-scene/events/Drinks-Named-for-New-York-.html — For some reason, I started collecting recipes that were named after New York or parts of New York. Can you name any more? Manhattan, 40ml Bourbon, 20ml red Vermouth, bitters, stirred-martini Brooklyn. 40ml bourbon 20ml dry Vermouth 5ml Maraschino, bitters, shaken-martini Bronx, 30ml gin, 15ml red Vermouth, 10ml dry Vermouth, 15ml OJ, shaken-martini Queens, 30ml gin, 15ml red Vermouth, 10ml dry Vermouth, 15ml Pineapple, shaken-martini Staten Island, 40ml white rum, 40ml Pineapple rocks Red Hook. 40ml bourbon 20ml Punt e mes 5ml Maraschino, bitters, stirred-martini Harlem Mugger. 15ml vodka, 15ml gin, 15ml white rum, 15ml tequila, 90ml champagne, topped with cranberry juice. straight up and garnished with a wedge of lime. Long Island Iced Tea. 15ml Vodka, 15ml Tequila, 15ml White Rum, 15ml Triple sec, 15ml Gin, 25ml Gomme, Dash of cola.  Algonquin. 40ml Rye, 20ml Dry Vermouth, 20ml Pineapple, shaken-martini Of course you may disagree about the exact quantities in each recipe. That's not teh point, but feel free to correct me!
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitNope. Not quite 12 year olds. 36 year olds. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Jenrick — Letter from the Newark MP to one of his constituents. Brexit cannot be reversed because that would be embarrassing. We are governed by 12 year olds.
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Commented on post by mathewThe web is like a cat. Imagine a giant cat with it's tail in your home and it's mouth in Google's servers. When you pull on it's tail, it cries in Google. Except there is no cat. (cf Einstein, allegedly) — « You don't get a clear warning that you're working on something that's bad for the world. They put you to work designing a machine that answers to "OK Google", not "OK Goebbels". »
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Commented on post by Finn Skancke-Engen in blue hazeI always put the disk lock in the rear wheel. Because when you ride away and bend the disk, a replacement rear disk is cheaper than a front one. — Trye to steal my bike. Hehe
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Commented on post by Vladimir Pecha in Vintage Astronomy, Science & ArtAn idea that needs re-inventing for 2020. — Today in 1985: Clive Sinclair launched the Sinclair C5 electric vehicle. It was a huge commercial failure.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit+Piero FilippIN Whereas I'm endlessly cycling around the three. Denial (This can't be happening), Anger (how could we be so stupid), Depression (There's no hope) As for Bargaining, who with? Both major parties are completely deaf. And Acceptance? Never! — We are in the begging phase now.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitJoined Labour for Corbyn. Left Labour over Labour's Brexit policy. There was a meme being spread by the Leavers after the last election that 83% (or something) of the population voted for a pro-brexit party. It's deeply, deeply depressing to discover that this is true. But what to do? How do you punish both major parties because they don't represent the views of the people who voted, supported and joined them? The UK is not Scotland. For all the other nations in the kingdom, there is no SNP to vote for. — Popcorn!
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeFoxtrot Foxtrot Sierra — Well done.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitGosh, there's a lot in there. And surprising just how confused the political landscape is now. And as usual, the comments are also deeply troubling. The two tribes really hate each other now even though they are very badly defined and with 50:50 splits across multiple axes. And where each split is a different set of people. — Putting the Brexit vote on the Political Compass Further slicing and dicing of referendum data. Here, voters have been measured along two scales, Left vs. Right (the "economic axis") and Authoritarian vs. Libertarian (the "ideological axis"). Just like the good old Political Compass does Turns out that there is a comparatively large overlap of Labour/Tory voters on the ideological axis, but not so much on the economic axis. No surprises here. And Leave/Remain voters? Exactly the opposite. Common ground on economic issues, but small overlap on ideological issues. Even more importantly, a large group of Leave voters find themselves in the upper left quadrant: economically left, and authoritarian. The classic Labour type from more than 50 years ago, in a fashion: in favour of nationalisation as well as in favour of the death penalty. Economically so far left that Marxism isn't a bad word anymore, but don't you dare say anything against the Royals. So who is representing people of that quadrant in parliament? Nobody.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeAre we talking about ancient Greece? — This is glorious.
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Commented on post by Joerg FliegeCharles Stross, amirite? http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2018/01/dude-you-broke-the-future.html — In case you suffer from Kurzweilianism, or something.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitHasn't he got this completely backwards? It's the UK that can't cherry pick the deal. So for instance, the EU won't let us have financial passporting and a low tax regime without all the rest, up to and including freedom of movement, the ECJ, Euratom and a N.I. open border. — Sure, Dave. You will get a fantastic deal with the EU. You just have to accept all aspects of the common market.
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Commented on post by Julian Bond in Google+ UpdatesTake a post that is a reshare. There are 3 comments on the original, and 5 comments on the share. When this post turns up in the main timeline, there is a shortened display of abbreviated text of the 5 share comments with no obvious indication of them being truncated. Click on it and they disappear completely. WTF? Hit the Expand button and all 5 are visible. Then go back and do it all again just to make sure before writing this comment and it all behaves slightly better. Seriously Google, wut? There's too much javascript with too many edge cases and it just breaks too often for what is a pretty simple but important function. Show me the damn comments! — This latest desktop web layout change. Is Google actively trying to reduce engagement? Because the ability to see and read comments really sucks. Where did the count of comments go? Why does anything you click on make everything jump up and down, hiding and then revealing some of the comments but not all. Why do the comments sometimes disappear completely.
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, SchmexitTop comment: "Change my name to Theresa Will. It sounds more convincing than Theresa May" — Theresa May's New Year resolutions leaked.
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Commented on post by Jared GivensBefore feeding them G&Ts to see if it would kill or cure them. — [Spits out mouthful of gin and tonic] 😀
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Commented on post by Jared GivensIf you enjoy bitter flavours, such as gin and tonic, then I'm sorry to tell you this, but you might be a psychopath Better stay away from Triple IPAs and craft beers then. Does that explain Nigel Farage? You hardly ever see him without a beer in his hand. In my experience, the real psychopaths are into Cristal and blow. But then I've spent time in the City of London. — [Spits out mouthful of gin and tonic] 😀
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexithttps://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/dec/28/brexit-department-david-davis-sidelined-talks-brussels Sidelined. or just not bothering to turn up and delegating everything instead. — David Davies, the intellectual heavyweight of the Brexit team, has apparently been sidelined from the Brexit negotiations.
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Commented on post by Graham Reed in MotoGPBorn to run Wendy let me in I wanna be your friend I want to guard your dreams and visions Just wrap your legs 'round these velvet rims And strap your hands 'cross my engines Together we could break this trap We'll run till we drop, baby we'll never go back H-Oh, Will you walk with me out on the wire `Cause baby I'm just a scared and lonely rider But I gotta know how it feels I want to know if love is wild Babe I want to know if love is real (inspired by that umbrella girl) — Can't wait for the new season to start in April 😄
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Commented on post by Joerg Fliege in Brexit, Schmexit1) It's the Grauniad. And they generally don't like Corbyn with one or two exceptions. 2) Maybe it's where I'm looking but I am sensing a growing backlash. Labour4EU and Labour Against Brexit groups are getting increasingly vocal. 3) It's not just the voters and members. The party is split 3 ways. - The EU is anti-socialist. Corbyn, Momentum. And anti-brexit would be political suicide. First we must regain power. - If Brexit is inevitable, then we should stay in the Single Market and Customs Union. Anything less is economic suicide and will blow up the UK (Ireland, Scotland) - Brexit must be stopped. — 31% of all Labour remain voters believe Labour is "completely against Brexit". 32% of all Labour leave voters believe Labour is "completely in favour of Brexit". That's actually quite impressive. I wonder how long they will be able to pull this off?